No one speaks english anymore??

Discussion in 'Digital Photography' started by Michael, Dec 23, 2003.

  1. Michael

    PeterN Guest

    On 3/28/2013 12:15 AM, Tony Cooper wrote:


    <snip>

    >
    > I have no experience, though, the Federal Class II prescriptions.
    >
    >


    Lucky guy. I hope you never have the need. At one point I was taking
    heavy doses for a radiation induced wound.
    --
    PeterN
     
    PeterN, Apr 1, 2013
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  2. Michael

    PeterN Guest

    On 3/28/2013 12:51 PM, David Taylor wrote:
    > On 28/03/2013 13:50, Savageduck wrote:
    > []
    >> Then your World is narrowly focused.
    >> Rx has been an abbreviation for "prescription" long before electronics
    >> and radio communications were dreamed of.

    >
    > Likely only in the US - certainly not in the UK. But I agree that from
    > the context it was fairly obvious. BTW, here in Scotland, all our
    > prescription medicine is free. Not so England!


    It's not really free. You pay for your meds with your taxes. From an
    economic POV it's simply insurance run by your government. BTW are you
    limited to a formularly?


    --
    PeterN
     
    PeterN, Apr 1, 2013
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  3. Michael

    PeterN Guest

    On 3/28/2013 5:57 PM, Rikishi42 wrote:
    > On 2013-03-27, nospam <> wrote:
    >> In article <>, Rikishi42
    >> <> wrote:
    >>
    >>>>>>>> My doctor hasn't written a paper Rx in over two years.
    >>>>>>>
    >>>>>>> Rx ??? I use rx & tx for transmit and receive in electronics and no one
    >>>>>>> tells me I've spelt them wrong, I assume you mean receipt but I've never
    >>>>>>> seen
    >>>>>>> Rx used for that.
    >>>>>>
    >>>>>> rx is short for prescription, which is obvious from context.
    >>>>>>
    >>>>>> anyway, it's done electronically now.
    >>>>>>
    >>>>> Pharmacies and physicians offices still seem to be very fond of faxing
    >>>>> even if the prevalence of computers in offices has increased. Come to
    >>>>> think of it, this medical anachronism is one of the few uses of faxes
    >>>>> that I can recall.
    >>>>
    >>>> and sometimes they phone in the prescription. either way, the patient
    >>>> doesn't leave with a piece of paper he has to take to a pharmacy. a
    >>>> huge advantage is that forged prescriptions become *extremely*
    >>>> difficult.
    >>>>
    >>>> as i said, these days everything is computerized. the doctor taps a few
    >>>> keys and the prescription is sent to the pharmacy. the patient either
    >>>> picks it up or has it delivered.
    >>>
    >>> Kind of restricting, in terms of where you can pick up your medication.

    >>
    >> not at all.
    >>
    >>> I mean, earlier this week I had to pickup something for my mother who was in
    >>> no state to drive. So I picked it up in a pharmacy in the next town, since I
    >>> had to run some other errands there.

    >>
    >> tell the doctor to send it to whatever pharmacy you want.

    >
    > We don't do that in Belgium. A patient gets the prescription (usually
    > printed out, sometimes still written) and takes it to the pharmacy of
    > his/her choice.
    >
    > But even if it would have been sent, that's my point: my mother would have
    > requested it'd be send to the pharmacy closest to her place. But I picked
    > up her prescription in the evening to get it the next day... and did so in
    > another town.
    >
    >
    >> it's also further proof that people don't price shop like tony wants to
    >> believe. people pick a pharmacy based on convenience or service because
    >> there isn't actually a price difference (unless they're uninsured).

    >
    > Well, again that couldn't really apply here. Prices are fixed. No
    > differences between pharmacists, not for medication anyway. So no price
    > shopping.
    > ... and no one is uninsured. Doesn't exist. And there aren't really any
    > "types" of insurance. We find it weird the quality of care should depend on
    > your wealth. Doesn't mean you can't get some extra's, but...
    >
    >
    > Allways wanted to ask this: is it true you can get medication in
    > supermarkets? Really? As if they were just groceries ?


    Yes!
    Some stores use low co-pays as inducements to shop there. In some places
    it takes over an hour to get a script filled. they expect you will shop
    during your waiting time.


    --
    PeterN
     
    PeterN, Apr 1, 2013
  4. Michael

    nospam Guest

    In article <5158cccb$0$10784$-secrets.com>, PeterN
    <> wrote:

    > BTW I fill the vast majority of my meds at a local pharamacy, because I
    > beleive in keeping the small guy in business. That doesn't mean I can't
    > get some of my meds cheaper somewhere else.


    in other words, you don't shop around for price. like i said, most
    people do not.
     
    nospam, Apr 1, 2013
  5. Michael

    PeterN Guest

    On 3/29/2013 6:17 PM, Tony Cooper wrote:


    <snip>
    ..
    >
    > A supermarket doesn't want to give up any more floorspace to the
    > pharmacy than it needs to. The space needed to count and package
    > medications is dead space financially when that part can be done
    > centrally elsewhere. A supermarket rates space usage by the return.
    >

    You remind me of an old story about the supermarket manager, who upon
    hering that the candy sold at the checkout counter cost more per square
    foot, than any other item in the karket, stopped selling candy at the
    checkout counter.


    > For those reasons, what you will normally see in a Florida supermarket
    > pharmacy is a small amount of square feet, two to four Pharmacy
    > Technicians, and shelves of pre-packaged medications. No Pharmacist,
    > no counting/packaging table, no bulk supplies.


    In nY every unit must be supervised by a licensed pharmacist.

    >
    > As far as this being "unusual", I don't know about the other 49
    > states, but I suspect you don't either. Unless, of course, you are
    > now doing market surveys with camera-equipped drones.
    >
    >
    >
    >
    >



    --
    PeterN
     
    PeterN, Apr 1, 2013
  6. Michael

    PeterN Guest

    On 3/31/2013 8:30 PM, nospam wrote:
    > In article <5158cccb$0$10784$-secrets.com>, PeterN
    > <> wrote:
    >
    >> BTW I fill the vast majority of my meds at a local pharamacy, because I
    >> beleive in keeping the small guy in business. That doesn't mean I can't
    >> get some of my meds cheaper somewhere else.

    >
    > in other words, you don't shop around for price. like i said, most
    > people do not.
    >


    Please present us with the FACTUAL and AUTHORITATIVE basis for your
    statement. I am waiting with bated breath, but shall not hold my breath
    until you answer

    --
    PeterN
     
    PeterN, Apr 1, 2013
  7. Michael

    Tony Cooper Guest

    On Sun, 31 Mar 2013 20:30:26 -0400, PeterN
    <> wrote:

    >On 3/29/2013 6:17 PM, Tony Cooper wrote:
    >
    >
    ><snip>
    >.
    >>
    >> A supermarket doesn't want to give up any more floorspace to the
    >> pharmacy than it needs to. The space needed to count and package
    >> medications is dead space financially when that part can be done
    >> centrally elsewhere. A supermarket rates space usage by the return.
    >>

    >You remind me of an old story about the supermarket manager, who upon
    >hering that the candy sold at the checkout counter cost more per square
    >foot, than any other item in the karket, stopped selling candy at the
    >checkout counter.
    >
    >
    >> For those reasons, what you will normally see in a Florida supermarket
    >> pharmacy is a small amount of square feet, two to four Pharmacy
    >> Technicians, and shelves of pre-packaged medications. No Pharmacist,
    >> no counting/packaging table, no bulk supplies.

    >
    >In nY every unit must be supervised by a licensed pharmacist.
    >

    A Florida pharmacist outlet in a supermarket is "supervised" by a
    registered pharmacist. Some of them have a sign that says something
    like "This facility under the supervision of...". The pharmacist,
    though, is not required to be on site. A word like "supervised" can be
    taken to mean different things.


    >>
    >> As far as this being "unusual", I don't know about the other 49
    >> states, but I suspect you don't either. Unless, of course, you are
    >> now doing market surveys with camera-equipped drones.
    >>
    >>
    >>
    >>
    >>

    --
    Tony Cooper - Orlando FL
     
    Tony Cooper, Apr 1, 2013
  8. Michael

    Tony Cooper Guest

    On Sun, 31 Mar 2013 20:17:51 -0400, PeterN
    <> wrote:

    >On 3/28/2013 5:57 PM, Rikishi42 wrote:
    >> On 2013-03-27, nospam <> wrote:
    >>> In article <>, Rikishi42
    >>> <> wrote:
    >>>
    >>>>>>>>> My doctor hasn't written a paper Rx in over two years.
    >>>>>>>>
    >>>>>>>> Rx ??? I use rx & tx for transmit and receive in electronics and no one
    >>>>>>>> tells me I've spelt them wrong, I assume you mean receipt but I've never
    >>>>>>>> seen
    >>>>>>>> Rx used for that.
    >>>>>>>
    >>>>>>> rx is short for prescription, which is obvious from context.
    >>>>>>>
    >>>>>>> anyway, it's done electronically now.
    >>>>>>>
    >>>>>> Pharmacies and physicians offices still seem to be very fond of faxing
    >>>>>> even if the prevalence of computers in offices has increased. Come to
    >>>>>> think of it, this medical anachronism is one of the few uses of faxes
    >>>>>> that I can recall.
    >>>>>
    >>>>> and sometimes they phone in the prescription. either way, the patient
    >>>>> doesn't leave with a piece of paper he has to take to a pharmacy. a
    >>>>> huge advantage is that forged prescriptions become *extremely*
    >>>>> difficult.
    >>>>>
    >>>>> as i said, these days everything is computerized. the doctor taps a few
    >>>>> keys and the prescription is sent to the pharmacy. the patient either
    >>>>> picks it up or has it delivered.
    >>>>
    >>>> Kind of restricting, in terms of where you can pick up your medication.
    >>>
    >>> not at all.
    >>>
    >>>> I mean, earlier this week I had to pickup something for my mother who was in
    >>>> no state to drive. So I picked it up in a pharmacy in the next town, since I
    >>>> had to run some other errands there.
    >>>
    >>> tell the doctor to send it to whatever pharmacy you want.

    >>
    >> We don't do that in Belgium. A patient gets the prescription (usually
    >> printed out, sometimes still written) and takes it to the pharmacy of
    >> his/her choice.
    >>
    >> But even if it would have been sent, that's my point: my mother would have
    >> requested it'd be send to the pharmacy closest to her place. But I picked
    >> up her prescription in the evening to get it the next day... and did so in
    >> another town.
    >>
    >>
    >>> it's also further proof that people don't price shop like tony wants to
    >>> believe. people pick a pharmacy based on convenience or service because
    >>> there isn't actually a price difference (unless they're uninsured).

    >>
    >> Well, again that couldn't really apply here. Prices are fixed. No
    >> differences between pharmacists, not for medication anyway. So no price
    >> shopping.
    >> ... and no one is uninsured. Doesn't exist. And there aren't really any
    >> "types" of insurance. We find it weird the quality of care should depend on
    >> your wealth. Doesn't mean you can't get some extra's, but...
    >>
    >>
    >> Allways wanted to ask this: is it true you can get medication in
    >> supermarkets? Really? As if they were just groceries ?

    >
    >Yes!
    >Some stores use low co-pays as inducements to shop there. In some places
    >it takes over an hour to get a script filled. they expect you will shop
    >during your waiting time.


    Certain antibiotics are free at some supermarket pharmacies and
    Wal-Mart pharmacies. Also Lisinopril and Metformin.
    --
    Tony Cooper - Orlando FL
     
    Tony Cooper, Apr 1, 2013
  9. Michael

    David Taylor Guest

    On 01/04/2013 01:12, PeterN wrote:
    > On 3/28/2013 12:51 PM, David Taylor wrote:
    >> On 28/03/2013 13:50, Savageduck wrote:
    >> []
    >>> Then your World is narrowly focused.
    >>> Rx has been an abbreviation for "prescription" long before electronics
    >>> and radio communications were dreamed of.

    >>
    >> Likely only in the US - certainly not in the UK. But I agree that from
    >> the context it was fairly obvious. BTW, here in Scotland, all our
    >> prescription medicine is free. Not so England!

    >
    > It's not really free. You pay for your meds with your taxes. From an
    > economic POV it's simply insurance run by your government. BTW are you
    > limited to a formularly?


    Let's say that it costs nothing at the point where you obtain it, then.
    I don't know the word "formularly" - it's not part of British English
    - but if you mean can I use my prescription anywhere, the answer is yes.
    Any chemist with a dispensary can supply the medications on the
    prescription as far as I know.
    --
    Cheers,
    David
    Web: http://www.satsignal.eu
     
    David Taylor, Apr 1, 2013
  10. Michael

    Whisky-dave Guest

    On Thursday, March 28, 2013 11:06:36 PM UTC, Savageduck wrote:
    > On 2013-03-28 14:50:49 -0700, Eric Stevens <> said:
    >
    >
    >
    > > On Thu, 28 Mar 2013 06:50:38 -0700, Savageduck

    >
    > > <savageduck1@{REMOVESPAM}me.com> wrote:

    >
    > >

    >
    > >> On 2013-03-28 06:35:01 -0700, Whisky-dave <> said:

    >
    > >>

    >
    > >>> On Wednesday, March 27, 2013 3:33:17 PM UTC, nospam wrote:

    >
    > >>>> In article <>,

    >
    > >>>>

    >
    > >>>> Whisky-dave <> wrote:

    >
    > >>>>

    >
    > >>>>>> My doctor hasn't written a paper Rx in over two years.

    >
    > >>>>

    >
    > >>>>> Rx ??? I use rx & tx for transmit and receive in electronics and no one

    >
    > >>>>> tells me I've spelt them wrong, I assume you mean receipt but I've never seen

    >
    > >>>>> Rx used for that.

    >
    > >>>>

    >
    > >>>>

    >
    > >>>> rx is short for prescription, which is obvious from context.

    >
    > >>>

    >
    > >>> Not in my world.

    >
    > >>

    >
    > >> Then your World is narrowly focused.

    >
    > >> Rx has been an abbreviation for "prescription" long before electronics

    >
    > >> and radio communications were dreamed of.

    >
    > >

    >
    > > Have you considered that it may be your world that is narrowly

    >
    > > focussed? There is much more to the world than the US.

    >
    > >

    >
    > > Rx for prescriptions is not used in the UK, New Zealand or Australia.

    >
    > > As far as I know it is not used in India, Switzerland or France. It

    >
    > > almost certainly is not used in Russia, China or Japan.

    >
    >
    >
    > I believe you will find that in a time of the not so recent past when a
    >
    > knowledge of Latin was a requirement of many,


    But nit for my generation of my parents it seems.


    > if not all Anglo-Saxon
    >
    > medical students in Britain and the colonies. Both my in-laws were
    >
    > doctors educated at Bristol University in the UK, and both were quite
    >
    > familiar with Latin usage for the mundane act of writing a
    >
    > prescription. One of the Latin script abbreviations in common usage was
    >
    > Rx usually written with the "x" formed by a stroke through the bottom
    >
    > of the right leg of the "R". I believe that if you query of a doctor in
    >
    > NZ of our vintage as to his understanding of the abbreviation "Rx" he
    >
    > will tell you that it is shorthand for the first instruction on a
    >
    > prescription, derived from the Latin "recipere" or "take".
    >
    >
    >
    > So "take this medication four times daily" could be written "Rx med QID".


    Could be but isn't it seems or not on any presecription I've seen in my life.

    I doubt giving patients intrustiions in latin is a good idea from the patients POV.


    > As I am sure you are well aware, the USA is one of those former English
    >
    > colonies which retains many quaint archaic usages of the English
    >
    > language which have faded into retirement in fair Albion.


    Yep, you're still using outdated imperial measurements too ;-)

    We still use them for some distancies we've pretty much given up on roman numerals too although I do understand them or can work them out.
    We don't speak shakespearean either that died out even before Latin did as far as the general public usage anyway, if you want to feel clever one way is to quote latin to someone that doesn't know it.
     
    Whisky-dave, Apr 2, 2013
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