NmH battery chargers- all the same?

Discussion in 'Digital Photography' started by Tom777, Jul 6, 2008.

  1. Tom777

    Tom777 Guest

    I have set of Panasonic NmH batteries with a Panasonic charger....
    they seem they have triple the life of my Everyready NmH batteries
    (same mah)....Is is because I am charging the Everyreadys in a
    Panasonic charger? Is there a difference in NmH chargers? My camera
    manual recommends charging their brand of batteries only with their
    charger.
    Tom777, Jul 6, 2008
    #1
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  2. Tom777

    ASAAR Guest

    On Sun, 6 Jul 2008 10:20:24 -0700 (PDT), Tom777 wrote:

    > I have set of Panasonic NmH batteries with a Panasonic charger....
    > they seem they have triple the life of my Everyready NmH batteries
    > (same mah)....Is is because I am charging the Everyreadys in a
    > Panasonic charger?


    If they have triple the life of your Eveready batteries, it's
    probably because the Eveready batteries have lost 2/3 of their
    capacity (assuming that the Panasonics haven't lost any). Under
    good conditions NiMH cells should last for hundreds of charge
    cycles, at which point manufacturers optimistically assume that they
    will have lost about 1/5 of their original capacity. For your
    Eveready batteries to have lost so much more, it might be reasonable
    to assume that they have not been ideally cared for.
    Over-discharging batteries before putting them back in the charger
    is a common way to shorten their lives. Actually, it's possible
    that not all of the Eveready cells has been damaged. Only one bad
    cell can make the entire set appear to have lost most of their
    capacity. Even if that's the case, you'd be better off replacing
    all of them, not just the bad cell.


    > Is there a difference in NmH chargers?


    Yes. But almost all chargers from reputable manufacturers should
    do a decent job charging your NiMH cells. It's nice to have a
    charger that can independently charge cells and has a charge
    indicator for each cell. One of these would allow you to also
    charge individual cells or sets of three, not just sets of 2 or 4,
    which is a common limitation of less expensive chargers that only
    charge pairs of NiMH cells.


    > My camera manual recommends charging their brand of batteries only
    > with their charger.


    That advice can be safely ignored in almost all cases. Exceptions
    would be if the batteries are of unique, proprietary designs that
    wouldn't allow them to be conveniently or safely used with commonly
    available, standard NiMH chargers. If Panasonic, Sanyo or Kodak
    sold cold cuts, they'd probably warn on their packages to only use
    Panasonic, Sanyo or Kodak brand bread when making sandwiches. :)
    ASAAR, Jul 6, 2008
    #2
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  3. Tom777

    Tom777 Guest

    On Jul 6, 3:12 pm, ASAAR <> wrote:
    > On Sun, 6 Jul 2008 10:20:24 -0700 (PDT), Tom777 wrote:
    > > I have set of Panasonic NmH batteries with a Panasonic charger....
    > > they seem they have triple the life of my Everyready NmH batteries
    > > (same mah)....Is is because I am charging the Everyreadys in a
    > > Panasonic charger?

    >
    >   If they have triple the life of your Eveready batteries, it's
    > probably because the Eveready batteries have lost 2/3 of their
    > capacity (assuming that the Panasonics haven't lost any).  Under
    > good conditions NiMH cells should last for hundreds of charge
    > cycles, at which point manufacturers optimistically assume that they
    > will have lost about 1/5 of their original capacity.  For your
    > Eveready batteries to have lost so much more, it might be reasonable
    > to assume that they have not been ideally cared for.
    > Over-discharging batteries before putting them back in the charger
    > is a common way to shorten their lives.  Actually, it's possible
    > that not all of the Eveready cells has been damaged.  Only one bad
    > cell can make the entire set appear to have lost most of their
    > capacity.  Even if that's the case, you'd be better off replacing
    > all of them, not just the bad cell.
    >
    > > Is there a difference in NmH chargers?

    >
    >   Yes.  But almost all chargers from reputable manufacturers should
    > do a decent job charging your NiMH cells.  It's nice to have a
    > charger that can independently charge cells and has a charge
    > indicator for each cell.  One of these would allow you to also
    > charge individual cells or sets of three, not just sets of 2 or 4,
    > which is a common limitation of less expensive chargers that only
    > charge pairs of NiMH cells.
    >
    > >  My camera manual recommends charging their brand of batteries only
    > > with their charger.

    >
    >   That advice can be safely ignored in almost all cases.  Exceptions
    > would be if the batteries are of unique, proprietary designs that
    > wouldn't allow them to be conveniently or safely used with commonly
    > available, standard NiMH chargers.  If Panasonic, Sanyo or Kodak
    > sold cold cuts, they'd probably warn on their packages to only use
    > Panasonic, Sanyo or Kodak brand bread when making sandwiches.  :)


    Thanks for your feedback. ....any other replies would be
    appreciated. Has anyone found one brand better than the other. A
    friend says that everyreadys have a short self-discharge rate, in
    other words, after a charge they lose their power quickly just sitting
    for a few weeks. Any other experiences?
    Tom777, Jul 6, 2008
    #3
  4. Tom777

    tomcas Guest

    Tom777 wrote:
    > On Jul 6, 3:12 pm, ASAAR <> wrote:
    >
    >>On Sun, 6 Jul 2008 10:20:24 -0700 (PDT), Tom777 wrote:
    >>
    >>>I have set of Panasonic NmH batteries with a Panasonic charger....
    >>>they seem they have triple the life of my Everyready NmH batteries
    >>>(same mah)....Is is because I am charging the Everyreadys in a
    >>>Panasonic charger?

    >>
    >> If they have triple the life of your Eveready batteries, it's
    >>probably because the Eveready batteries have lost 2/3 of their
    >>capacity (assuming that the Panasonics haven't lost any). Under
    >>good conditions NiMH cells should last for hundreds of charge
    >>cycles, at which point manufacturers optimistically assume that they
    >>will have lost about 1/5 of their original capacity. For your
    >>Eveready batteries to have lost so much more, it might be reasonable
    >>to assume that they have not been ideally cared for.
    >>Over-discharging batteries before putting them back in the charger
    >>is a common way to shorten their lives. Actually, it's possible
    >>that not all of the Eveready cells has been damaged. Only one bad
    >>cell can make the entire set appear to have lost most of their
    >>capacity. Even if that's the case, you'd be better off replacing
    >>all of them, not just the bad cell.
    >>
    >>
    >>>Is there a difference in NmH chargers?

    >>
    >> Yes. But almost all chargers from reputable manufacturers should
    >>do a decent job charging your NiMH cells. It's nice to have a
    >>charger that can independently charge cells and has a charge
    >>indicator for each cell. One of these would allow you to also
    >>charge individual cells or sets of three, not just sets of 2 or 4,
    >>which is a common limitation of less expensive chargers that only
    >>charge pairs of NiMH cells.
    >>
    >>
    >>> My camera manual recommends charging their brand of batteries only
    >>>with their charger.

    >>
    >> That advice can be safely ignored in almost all cases. Exceptions
    >>would be if the batteries are of unique, proprietary designs that
    >>wouldn't allow them to be conveniently or safely used with commonly
    >>available, standard NiMH chargers. If Panasonic, Sanyo or Kodak
    >>sold cold cuts, they'd probably warn on their packages to only use
    >>Panasonic, Sanyo or Kodak brand bread when making sandwiches. :)

    >
    >
    > Thanks for your feedback. ....any other replies would be
    > appreciated. Has anyone found one brand better than the other. A
    > friend says that everyreadys have a short self-discharge rate, in
    > other words, after a charge they lose their power quickly just sitting
    > for a few weeks. Any other experiences?


    I have found the same problem with Eveready. They would loose the charge
    in a few days. I have since switched to Duracell and have not
    experienced the same self discharge problem that the Eveready batteries had.
    tomcas, Jul 7, 2008
    #4
  5. Tom777

    ASAAR Guest

    On Sun, 6 Jul 2008 15:04:34 -0700 (PDT), Tom777 wrote:

    > Thanks for your feedback. ....any other replies would be
    > appreciated. Has anyone found one brand better than the other. A
    > friend says that everyreadys have a short self-discharge rate, in
    > other words, after a charge they lose their power quickly just sitting
    > for a few weeks. Any other experiences?


    There's nothing wrong with Eveready cells. They're just the
    traditional NiMH type of cell, similar to NiCads, that can't hold
    most of their charge for months at a time. If your friend doesn't
    like Eveready batteries, he's going to have a problem with batteries
    from all manufacturers. There are basically two types of NiMH
    cells. Standard and low self-discharge. The latter type can hold a
    significant charge for a year or two, but they have less capacity
    than standard NiMH cells, 2,000-2,100mah vs. about 2,600-2,800mah
    for the higher self-discharge 'standard' NiMH cells. For heavy use,
    standard cells are better because they're generally cheaper, and
    last longer before needing to be recharged. For light use, such as
    where cells can last a month or more between charges, low
    self-discharge cells are usually preferable. As far as I'm aware,
    all of the companies that produce low self-discharge batteries also
    sell standard NiMH cells.

    The low self-discharge cells typically go by different names.
    Sanyo calls theirs "Eneloop". RayOVac's are called "Hybrid". The
    ones packaged by Radio Shack don't seem to have a special name.
    What they have in common is that they're sold "pre-charged", and the
    package should say somewhere on it that they can be used
    immediately, without needing to first put them in a charger.
    Several manufacturers have stated that their low self-discharge
    cells can be charged using any properly designed NiMH charger. If
    you still have questions, manufacturer's websites often have data
    sheets and application notes that can be very informative.
    ASAAR, Jul 7, 2008
    #5
  6. Tom777

    Dave Cohen Guest

    ASAAR wrote:
    > On Sun, 6 Jul 2008 15:04:34 -0700 (PDT), Tom777 wrote:
    >
    >> Thanks for your feedback. ....any other replies would be
    >> appreciated. Has anyone found one brand better than the other. A
    >> friend says that everyreadys have a short self-discharge rate, in
    >> other words, after a charge they lose their power quickly just sitting
    >> for a few weeks. Any other experiences?

    >
    > There's nothing wrong with Eveready cells. They're just the
    > traditional NiMH type of cell, similar to NiCads, that can't hold
    > most of their charge for months at a time. If your friend doesn't
    > like Eveready batteries, he's going to have a problem with batteries
    > from all manufacturers. There are basically two types of NiMH
    > cells. Standard and low self-discharge. The latter type can hold a
    > significant charge for a year or two, but they have less capacity
    > than standard NiMH cells, 2,000-2,100mah vs. about 2,600-2,800mah
    > for the higher self-discharge 'standard' NiMH cells. For heavy use,
    > standard cells are better because they're generally cheaper, and
    > last longer before needing to be recharged. For light use, such as
    > where cells can last a month or more between charges, low
    > self-discharge cells are usually preferable. As far as I'm aware,
    > all of the companies that produce low self-discharge batteries also
    > sell standard NiMH cells.
    >
    > The low self-discharge cells typically go by different names.
    > Sanyo calls theirs "Eneloop". RayOVac's are called "Hybrid". The
    > ones packaged by Radio Shack don't seem to have a special name.
    > What they have in common is that they're sold "pre-charged", and the
    > package should say somewhere on it that they can be used
    > immediately, without needing to first put them in a charger.
    > Several manufacturers have stated that their low self-discharge
    > cells can be charged using any properly designed NiMH charger. If
    > you still have questions, manufacturer's websites often have data
    > sheets and application notes that can be very informative.
    >


    Yes, Radio Shack low discharge didn't seem to have a special name, but
    last time I saw them displayed they did seem to have a special price
    (grin). While I'm on that subject, I notice some Walmart stores are
    displaying low self discharge Duracell and again significantly more
    expensive than other brands. I paid $12 for my eneloops a couple of
    years back at Ritz and I consider them the best choice.
    Dave Cohen
    Dave Cohen, Jul 7, 2008
    #6
  7. Tom777

    tomcas Guest

    ASAAR wrote:
    > On Sun, 6 Jul 2008 15:04:34 -0700 (PDT), Tom777 wrote:
    >
    >
    >>Thanks for your feedback. ....any other replies would be
    >>appreciated. Has anyone found one brand better than the other. A
    >>friend says that everyreadys have a short self-discharge rate, in
    >>other words, after a charge they lose their power quickly just sitting
    >>for a few weeks. Any other experiences?

    >
    >
    > There's nothing wrong with Eveready cells. They're just the
    > traditional NiMH type of cell, similar to NiCads, that can't hold
    > most of their charge for months at a time. If your friend doesn't
    > like Eveready batteries, he's going to have a problem with batteries
    > from all manufacturers. There are basically two types of NiMH
    > cells. Standard and low self-discharge. The latter type can hold a
    > significant charge for a year or two, but they have less capacity
    > than standard NiMH cells, 2,000-2,100mah vs. about 2,600-2,800mah
    > for the higher self-discharge 'standard' NiMH cells. For heavy use,
    > standard cells are better because they're generally cheaper, and
    > last longer before needing to be recharged. For light use, such as
    > where cells can last a month or more between charges, low
    > self-discharge cells are usually preferable. As far as I'm aware,
    > all of the companies that produce low self-discharge batteries also
    > sell standard NiMH cells.
    >
    > The low self-discharge cells typically go by different names.
    > Sanyo calls theirs "Eneloop". RayOVac's are called "Hybrid". The
    > ones packaged by Radio Shack don't seem to have a special name.
    > What they have in common is that they're sold "pre-charged", and the
    > package should say somewhere on it that they can be used
    > immediately, without needing to first put them in a charger.
    > Several manufacturers have stated that their low self-discharge
    > cells can be charged using any properly designed NiMH charger. If
    > you still have questions, manufacturer's websites often have data
    > sheets and application notes that can be very informative.
    >

    I disagree. I purchased several packs of Evereadys and after a couple
    months they began to leak current badly. After several months they were
    completely useless. None had been recharged more then a couple dozen
    times and all were charged with the same charger I'm currently using on
    Duracells that are performing so much better than the Evereadys. Too
    me, it certainly seems like Eveready had a seriously bad production run.
    tomcas, Jul 9, 2008
    #7
  8. Tom777

    ASAAR Guest

    On Tue, 08 Jul 2008 20:47:06 -0400, tomcas wrote:

    > I disagree. I purchased several packs of Evereadys and after a couple
    > months they began to leak current badly. After several months they were
    > completely useless. None had been recharged more then a couple dozen
    > times and all were charged with the same charger I'm currently using on
    > Duracells that are performing so much better than the Evereadys. Too
    > me, it certainly seems like Eveready had a seriously bad production run.


    A bad production run is certainly possible, but so is damage that
    occurred after being purchased. I've used many NiMH brands and it
    has been several years since any of them suffered from anything
    other than old age. I'm still using fairly old "Evereadys"
    (actually 2,500mAh Energizer cells) as well as Duracells and they
    don't show any significant difference in performance. YMM(it does)V.
    ASAAR, Jul 9, 2008
    #8
  9. Tom777

    meanna127

    Joined:
    Jun 28, 2013
    Messages:
    1
    Li-ion batteries

    I have 3 Nokia phone, 1 Samsung phone, Nikon camara, ipod.
    The problem is whenever I go out of city I have to carry 6 chargers.
    Now I come to know that there are a universal cherger with multeple sockets. Can one such chargers is good for all products ??
    meanna127, Jun 28, 2013
    #9
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