Nikon's patent applications for mirrorless camera system?

Discussion in 'Digital Photography' started by Bruce, Nov 5, 2010.

  1. Bruce

    Bruce Guest

    "J. Clarke" <> wrote:
    >
    >Uh, what makes anybody think that a four cylinder engine is necessarily
    >small or low powered?



    You can make a very large and powerful four cylinder engine.

    However, there is a consensus that any four cylinder engine larger
    than, say, 2.0 - 2.5 litres is unlikely to be sufficiently refined for
    automotive use. Having driven vehicles with 2.5 litre four cylinder
    engines I would tend to agree.
     
    Bruce, Nov 17, 2010
    #21
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  2. On 11/18/10 PDT 8:56 PM, Paul Furman wrote:

    >
    > But I never heard of a big cargo ship that works like a modern sailboat.
    > My (limited) understanding is the big square sails are only good for
    > sailing with the wind behind your back (like a spinnaker) using the
    > trade winds - but they flounder if the winds aren't cooperating.


    A modern large cargo ship would be Marconi rigged, but even square
    sailers weren't strictly down wind. More across, if you will. Some could
    sail at a bit better than 90 degrees off the wind, but effectively this
    means they can't go dead up wind no matter how many tacks they make.

    --
    john mcwilliams
     
    John McWilliams, Nov 19, 2010
    #22
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  3. Bruce

    J. Clarke Guest

    In article <ic50la$2n3$-september.org>,
    says...
    >
    > On 11/18/10 PDT 8:56 PM, Paul Furman wrote:
    >
    > >
    > > But I never heard of a big cargo ship that works like a modern sailboat.
    > > My (limited) understanding is the big square sails are only good for
    > > sailing with the wind behind your back (like a spinnaker) using the
    > > trade winds - but they flounder if the winds aren't cooperating.

    >
    > A modern large cargo ship would be Marconi rigged, but even square
    > sailers weren't strictly down wind. More across, if you will. Some could
    > sail at a bit better than 90 degrees off the wind, but effectively this
    > means they can't go dead up wind no matter how many tacks they make.


    According to Alan Villiers, "6 compass points from the wind". Howard
    Chappelle says 5.5. I've read that Nelson's logs report tacks through
    90 degrees. Put it all together and one can say that an average ship in
    good hands could point within 45-50 degrees of the wind. STS Mir, a
    conventional full-rigged ship designed in the 1980s, can point 38.5
    degrees. Maltese Falcon, using the Dynasail design, a thorough
    modernization of the square rig, has demonstrated 38.

    The notion that a square rigger can't beat to windward just plain flies
    in the face of history.

    As for a modern cargo vessel having a Marconi rig, that's a possibility,
    however historically fore and aft rigs haven't done too well on large
    cargo vessels--compare the histories of the six and seven masted
    schooners with those of the largest square-riggers.
     
    J. Clarke, Nov 19, 2010
    #23
  4. Bruce

    Wilba Guest

    Neil Harrington wrote:
    > Wilba wrote:
    >> Neil Ellwood wrote:
    >>> Wilba wrote:
    >>>> Pete Stavrakoglou wrote:
    >>>>> Savageduck wrote:
    >>>>>> Pete Stavrakoglou said:
    >>>>>>>
    >>>>>>> I was able to average 28 mpg on the open highway in my Hemi Chrysler
    >>>>>>> 300C!
    >>>>>>> Never thought I'd see a day like that.
    >>>>>>
    >>>>>> ...but the 300C, on the open Hwy, with cruise control set, shuts down
    >>>>>> one bank of cylinders to become a virtual 4 banger.
    >>>>>
    >>>>> Yes it does, and it is very effective. Still, you get V8 power and
    >>>>> high MPG. City mileage was quite respectable for a V8. Older V8s
    >>>>> back
    >>>>> in the day would get 10 MPG, no it's almost double that for some. Not
    >>>>> too shabby.
    >>>>
    >>>> The most fuel efficient form of transport was the old sailing ship -
    >>>> they got a million miles to the galleon.
    >>>
    >>> Not quite true. Most wouldn't have even got to 100,000 miles and the
    >>> control systems used a great deal of manpower. Sails were very labour
    >>> intensive until 19th century.

    >>
    >> Yeah? Wow. Do you have references so that I can update my database?
    >> Thanks!

    >
    > Google or Wikipedia should be able to help you out there.
    >
    > But the long and short of it is, he's right. Square-rigged vessels (up to
    > the 19th century) took a great deal of manpower to operate -- men going
    > aloft to manage the sails, etc. Later boats with fore-and-aft rigging
    > required much less crew which could manage everything from the deck, and
    > in fact several have circumnavigated the globe single-handed -- which I
    > doubt anyone would even dream of trying with a square-rigger.
    >
    > Joshua Slocum was the first to do this, in the 1890s. A retired sea
    > captain who had sailed square-rigged ships most of his life, he had to
    > teach himself to handle a fore-and-aft rig. He wrote a book about his
    > three-year voyage, "Sailing Alone Around the World." A fascinating read,
    > and you can probably find the book free for the downloading somewhere.
    > Highly recommended.


    That's very interesting Neil, but what does it have to do with the question?
     
    Wilba, Nov 21, 2010
    #24
  5. Bruce

    J. Clarke Guest

    In article <4ce8c806$0$29898$c3e8da3$>,
    says...
    >
    > Neil Harrington wrote:
    > > Wilba wrote:
    > >> Neil Ellwood wrote:
    > >>> Wilba wrote:
    > >>>> Pete Stavrakoglou wrote:
    > >>>>> Savageduck wrote:
    > >>>>>> Pete Stavrakoglou said:
    > >>>>>>>
    > >>>>>>> I was able to average 28 mpg on the open highway in my Hemi Chrysler
    > >>>>>>> 300C!
    > >>>>>>> Never thought I'd see a day like that.
    > >>>>>>
    > >>>>>> ...but the 300C, on the open Hwy, with cruise control set, shuts down
    > >>>>>> one bank of cylinders to become a virtual 4 banger.
    > >>>>>
    > >>>>> Yes it does, and it is very effective. Still, you get V8 power and
    > >>>>> high MPG. City mileage was quite respectable for a V8. Older V8s
    > >>>>> back
    > >>>>> in the day would get 10 MPG, no it's almost double that for some. Not
    > >>>>> too shabby.
    > >>>>
    > >>>> The most fuel efficient form of transport was the old sailing ship -
    > >>>> they got a million miles to the galleon.
    > >>>
    > >>> Not quite true. Most wouldn't have even got to 100,000 miles and the
    > >>> control systems used a great deal of manpower. Sails were very labour
    > >>> intensive until 19th century.
    > >>
    > >> Yeah? Wow. Do you have references so that I can update my database?
    > >> Thanks!

    > >
    > > Google or Wikipedia should be able to help you out there.
    > >
    > > But the long and short of it is, he's right. Square-rigged vessels (up to
    > > the 19th century) took a great deal of manpower to operate -- men going
    > > aloft to manage the sails, etc. Later boats with fore-and-aft rigging
    > > required much less crew which could manage everything from the deck, and
    > > in fact several have circumnavigated the globe single-handed -- which I
    > > doubt anyone would even dream of trying with a square-rigger.
    > >
    > > Joshua Slocum was the first to do this, in the 1890s. A retired sea
    > > captain who had sailed square-rigged ships most of his life, he had to
    > > teach himself to handle a fore-and-aft rig. He wrote a book about his
    > > three-year voyage, "Sailing Alone Around the World." A fascinating read,
    > > and you can probably find the book free for the downloading somewhere.
    > > Highly recommended.

    >
    > That's very interesting Neil, but what does it have to do with the question?


    He obviously doesn't understand that it takes a bit more effort to
    manage a 400 foot long 11,000 ton merchant ship than it does to manage a
    40 foot long 12 ton oyster boat.

    And in point of fact he's wrong about the square rigger, too. One
    person can operate the 289 foot long "Maltese Falcon", a thoroughly
    modern square rigger, although her size, value, and technological
    complexity preclude single-handed passages.
     
    J. Clarke, Nov 21, 2010
    #25
  6. Bruce

    John Turco Guest

    Pete Stavrakoglou wrote:

    <heavily edited for brevity>

    > GM could never produce a compact that came close to the quality of the
    > Japanese makes or VW. And to this day with the possible exception of
    > the Chevy cobalt replacement, they still haven't produced a good compact.
    > Although GM has given us great Vettes and some trucks, they also gave us
    > the Vega, Citation, Monza, Chevette, Cavalier, Sunbird, those awful 1st
    > generation minivans, and on and on.


    <edited>

    Well, I must dispute your offhand criticism of the Cavalier. Our 4-door,
    4-cylinder 2002 model (bought used, in November of 2003) has been a rather
    reliable machine. It averages around 22 MPG in the city, has no visible
    rust (and very few rattles), never needs waxing and its body style is
    quite attractive.

    Plus, I believe it came with practically every option available, except
    power windows. All in all, this particular Cavalier is a cute car that
    provides comfortable and economical transportation.

    --
    Cordially,
    John Turco <>

    Marie's Musings <http://fairiesandtails.blogspot.com>
     
    John Turco, Nov 28, 2010
    #26
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