Nikon Repair Parts

Discussion in 'Digital Photography' started by tony cooper, Feb 18, 2012.

  1. tony cooper

    tony cooper Guest

    I stopped by my local camera repair shop just for a chat. The owner
    is a personal friend as well as a professional source for repair. I
    asked him if Nikon's new policy would negatively affect him.

    On the contrary, he's delighted. He's felt obligated to take on Nikon
    repairs for good customers in the past, and it's been a pain in the
    ass for him. Parts took months to arrive, he spent (non-billable)
    hours on the phone placing and checking on orders, and faced
    horrendous hold times when doing so.

    Now, he can decline a repair in good conscience if new parts are
    required. He still repairs Nikons, but either repairs the damaged
    parts or uses his vast stock of salvage cameras as a parts source.

    When I was there, he was working on a Canon that had been dropped in
    salt water by a nature photographer. I was kind of surprised by his
    advice on what to do if you drop your camera in salt water:
    immediately put it in a bucket of fresh water, leave it in the bucket
    of water and take it in for repair immediately.

    Fresh water is much less damaging than salt water, and the trick is to
    keep the camera in water and not allow the camera to dry out.


    --
    Tony Cooper - Orlando, Florida
     
    tony cooper, Feb 18, 2012
    #1
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  2. tony cooper

    philo Guest

    On 02/18/2012 01:08 PM, tony cooper wrote:
    > I stopped by my local camera repair shop just for a chat. The owner
    > is a personal friend as well as a professional source for repair. I
    > asked him if Nikon's new policy would negatively affect him.
    >
    > On the contrary, he's delighted. He's felt obligated to take on Nikon
    > repairs for good customers in the past, and it's been a pain in the
    > ass for him. Parts took months to arrive, he spent (non-billable)
    > hours on the phone placing and checking on orders, and faced
    > horrendous hold times when doing so.
    >
    > Now, he can decline a repair in good conscience if new parts are
    > required. He still repairs Nikons, but either repairs the damaged
    > parts or uses his vast stock of salvage cameras as a parts source.
    >
    > When I was there, he was working on a Canon that had been dropped in
    > salt water by a nature photographer. I was kind of surprised by his
    > advice on what to do if you drop your camera in salt water:
    > immediately put it in a bucket of fresh water, leave it in the bucket
    > of water and take it in for repair immediately.
    >
    > Fresh water is much less damaging than salt water, and the trick is to
    > keep the camera in water and not allow the camera to dry out.
    >
    >




    That's why I like to do my "nature" photography in bars and nightclubs...
    a little spilled booze on the camera does it no real harm :)
     
    philo, Feb 18, 2012
    #2
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  3. tony cooper

    Vance Guest

    On Feb 18, 11:08 am, tony cooper <> wrote:
    > I stopped by my local camera repair shop just for a chat.  The owner
    > is a personal friend as well as a professional source for repair.  I
    > asked him if Nikon's new policy would negatively affect him.
    >
    > On the contrary, he's delighted.  He's felt obligated to take on Nikon
    > repairs for good customers in the past, and it's been a pain in the
    > ass for him.  Parts took months to arrive, he spent (non-billable)
    > hours on the phone placing and checking on orders, and faced
    > horrendous hold times when doing so.
    >
    > Now, he can decline a repair in good conscience if new parts are
    > required.  He still repairs Nikons, but either repairs the damaged
    > parts or uses his vast stock of salvage cameras as a parts source.
    >
    > When I was there, he was working on a Canon that had been dropped in
    > salt water by a nature photographer.  I was kind of surprised by his
    > advice on what to do if you drop your camera in salt water:
    > immediately put it in a bucket of fresh water, leave it in the bucket
    > of water and take it in for repair immediately.
    >
    > Fresh water is much less damaging than salt water, and the trick is to
    > keep the camera in water and not allow the camera to dry out.
    >
    > --
    > Tony Cooper - Orlando, Florida
     
    Vance, Feb 19, 2012
    #3
  4. tony cooper

    Vance Guest

    On Feb 18, 11:08 am, tony cooper <> wrote:
    > I stopped by my local camera repair shop just for a chat.  The owner
    > is a personal friend as well as a professional source for repair.  I
    > asked him if Nikon's new policy would negatively affect him.
    >
    > On the contrary, he's delighted.  He's felt obligated to take on Nikon
    > repairs for good customers in the past, and it's been a pain in the
    > ass for him.  Parts took months to arrive, he spent (non-billable)
    > hours on the phone placing and checking on orders, and faced
    > horrendous hold times when doing so.
    >
    > Now, he can decline a repair in good conscience if new parts are
    > required.  He still repairs Nikons, but either repairs the damaged
    > parts or uses his vast stock of salvage cameras as a parts source.
    >
    > When I was there, he was working on a Canon that had been dropped in
    > salt water by a nature photographer.  I was kind of surprised by his
    > advice on what to do if you drop your camera in salt water:
    > immediately put it in a bucket of fresh water, leave it in the bucket
    > of water and take it in for repair immediately.
    >
    > Fresh water is much less damaging than salt water, and the trick is to
    > keep the camera in water and not allow the camera to dry out.
    >
    > --
    > Tony Cooper - Orlando, Florida


    Sorry about the blank post. The fresh water is a great idea. I would
    take the battery out, though. Any initial damage from the current has
    already been done, but fresh water is not a great conductor, but the
    leads from the battery are. If the battery didn't short out, there is
    going to be some current in the circuits somewhere and that current
    MIGHT cause some damage that wouldn't need repair otherwise.

    Just a thought.

    Vance
     
    Vance, Feb 19, 2012
    #4
  5. tony cooper

    Robert Coe Guest

    On Sat, 18 Feb 2012 18:54:58 -0800 (PST), Vance <> wrote:
    : On Feb 18, 11:08 am, tony cooper <> wrote:
    : > I stopped by my local camera repair shop just for a chat.  The owner
    : > is a personal friend as well as a professional source for repair.  I
    : > asked him if Nikon's new policy would negatively affect him.
    : >
    : > On the contrary, he's delighted.  He's felt obligated to take on Nikon
    : > repairs for good customers in the past, and it's been a pain in the
    : > ass for him.  Parts took months to arrive, he spent (non-billable)
    : > hours on the phone placing and checking on orders, and faced
    : > horrendous hold times when doing so.
    : >
    : > Now, he can decline a repair in good conscience if new parts are
    : > required.  He still repairs Nikons, but either repairs the damaged
    : > parts or uses his vast stock of salvage cameras as a parts source.
    : >
    : > When I was there, he was working on a Canon that had been dropped in
    : > salt water by a nature photographer.  I was kind of surprised by his
    : > advice on what to do if you drop your camera in salt water:
    : > immediately put it in a bucket of fresh water, leave it in the bucket
    : > of water and take it in for repair immediately.
    : >
    : > Fresh water is much less damaging than salt water, and the trick is to
    : > keep the camera in water and not allow the camera to dry out.
    : >
    : > --
    : > Tony Cooper - Orlando, Florida
    :
    : Sorry about the blank post. The fresh water is a great idea. I would
    : take the battery out, though. Any initial damage from the current has
    : already been done, but fresh water is not a great conductor, but the
    : leads from the battery are. If the battery didn't short out, there is
    : going to be some current in the circuits somewhere and that current
    : MIGHT cause some damage that wouldn't need repair otherwise.
    :
    : Just a thought.
    :
    : Vance
     
    Robert Coe, Feb 19, 2012
    #5
  6. tony cooper

    PeterN Guest

    On 2/19/2012 12:40 AM, Robert Coe wrote:
    > On Sat, 18 Feb 2012 18:54:58 -0800 (PST), Vance<> wrote:
    > : On Feb 18, 11:08 am, tony cooper<> wrote:
    > :> I stopped by my local camera repair shop just for a chat. The owner
    > :> is a personal friend as well as a professional source for repair. I
    > :> asked him if Nikon's new policy would negatively affect him.
    > :>
    > :> On the contrary, he's delighted. He's felt obligated to take on Nikon
    > :> repairs for good customers in the past, and it's been a pain in the
    > :> ass for him. Parts took months to arrive, he spent (non-billable)
    > :> hours on the phone placing and checking on orders, and faced
    > :> horrendous hold times when doing so.
    > :>
    > :> Now, he can decline a repair in good conscience if new parts are
    > :> required. He still repairs Nikons, but either repairs the damaged
    > :> parts or uses his vast stock of salvage cameras as a parts source.
    > :>
    > :> When I was there, he was working on a Canon that had been dropped in
    > :> salt water by a nature photographer. I was kind of surprised by his
    > :> advice on what to do if you drop your camera in salt water:
    > :> immediately put it in a bucket of fresh water, leave it in the bucket
    > :> of water and take it in for repair immediately.
    > :>
    > :> Fresh water is much less damaging than salt water, and the trick is to
    > :> keep the camera in water and not allow the camera to dry out.
    > :>
    > :> --
    > :> Tony Cooper - Orlando, Florida
    > :
    > : Sorry about the blank post. The fresh water is a great idea. I would
    > : take the battery out, though. Any initial damage from the current has
    > : already been done, but fresh water is not a great conductor, but the
    > : leads from the battery are. If the battery didn't short out, there is
    > : going to be some current in the circuits somewhere and that current
    > : MIGHT cause some damage that wouldn't need repair otherwise.
    > :
    > : Just a thought.
    > :
    > : Vance



    LOL

    --
    Peter
     
    PeterN, Feb 19, 2012
    #6
  7. tony cooper <> writes:

    > When I was there, he was working on a Canon that had been dropped in
    > salt water by a nature photographer. I was kind of surprised by his
    > advice on what to do if you drop your camera in salt water:
    > immediately put it in a bucket of fresh water, leave it in the bucket
    > of water and take it in for repair immediately.


    That's been the standard advice ever since I first read about it in the
    1970s.
    --
    David Dyer-Bennet, ; http://dd-b.net/
    Snapshots: http://dd-b.net/dd-b/SnapshotAlbum/data/
    Photos: http://dd-b.net/photography/gallery/
    Dragaera: http://dragaera.info
     
    David Dyer-Bennet, Feb 20, 2012
    #7
  8. tony cooper

    tony cooper Guest

    On Mon, 20 Feb 2012 10:58:06 -0600, David Dyer-Bennet <>
    wrote:

    >tony cooper <> writes:
    >
    >> When I was there, he was working on a Canon that had been dropped in
    >> salt water by a nature photographer. I was kind of surprised by his
    >> advice on what to do if you drop your camera in salt water:
    >> immediately put it in a bucket of fresh water, leave it in the bucket
    >> of water and take it in for repair immediately.

    >
    >That's been the standard advice ever since I first read about it in the
    >1970s.


    Well, I wouldn't have known. I posted here because there might be
    other people who wouldn't have known, either.

    --
    Tony Cooper - Orlando, Florida
     
    tony cooper, Feb 20, 2012
    #8
  9. tony cooper

    tony cooper Guest

    On Mon, 20 Feb 2012 16:17:00 -0500, Alan Browne
    <> wrote:

    >On 2012-02-20 14:36 , tony cooper wrote:
    >> On Mon, 20 Feb 2012 10:58:06 -0600, David Dyer-Bennet<>
    >> wrote:
    >>
    >>> tony cooper<> writes:
    >>>
    >>>> When I was there, he was working on a Canon that had been dropped in
    >>>> salt water by a nature photographer. I was kind of surprised by his
    >>>> advice on what to do if you drop your camera in salt water:
    >>>> immediately put it in a bucket of fresh water, leave it in the bucket
    >>>> of water and take it in for repair immediately.
    >>>
    >>> That's been the standard advice ever since I first read about it in the
    >>> 1970s.

    >>
    >> Well, I wouldn't have known. I posted here because there might be
    >> other people who wouldn't have known, either.

    >
    >I tend to doubt the efficacy of this on the latest electronic monsters
    >we have v. the largely mechanical machines of yore.


    It's not something I've personally experienced, Alan, but the person
    who told me this repairs a lot of cameras and has been in business for
    over 25 years. Since our local nature photographers spend a lot of
    time in the (saltwater) wetlands on the east coast of Florida, and
    some surely drop cameras in the water, I tend to accept his word.

    >It might reduce the overall repair bill however or at least make it
    >cheaper to repair v. replace.


    Wouldn't that be the objective of anyone who drops a camera into
    saltwater? What more could you ask?




    --
    Tony Cooper - Orlando, Florida
     
    tony cooper, Feb 20, 2012
    #9
  10. tony cooper

    me Guest

    On Mon, 20 Feb 2012 16:17:00 -0500, Alan Browne
    <> wrote:

    >On 2012-02-20 14:36 , tony cooper wrote:
    >> On Mon, 20 Feb 2012 10:58:06 -0600, David Dyer-Bennet<>
    >> wrote:
    >>
    >>> tony cooper<> writes:
    >>>
    >>>> When I was there, he was working on a Canon that had been dropped in
    >>>> salt water by a nature photographer. I was kind of surprised by his
    >>>> advice on what to do if you drop your camera in salt water:
    >>>> immediately put it in a bucket of fresh water, leave it in the bucket
    >>>> of water and take it in for repair immediately.
    >>>
    >>> That's been the standard advice ever since I first read about it in the
    >>> 1970s.

    >>
    >> Well, I wouldn't have known. I posted here because there might be
    >> other people who wouldn't have known, either.

    >
    >I tend to doubt the efficacy of this on the latest electronic monsters
    >we have v. the largely mechanical machines of yore.
    >
    >It might reduce the overall repair bill however or at least make it
    >cheaper to repair v. replace.


    I know of a professional photographer in the area who dropped his
    Canon setup including the newest 400 f/2.8 in the water on a trip to
    South American. Even given his membership in whatever pro group Canon
    has CanonUSA which is just around the corner refused to try to repair
    it.
     
    me, Feb 21, 2012
    #10
  11. tony cooper

    J. Clarke Guest

    In article <>, says...
    >
    > tony cooper <> writes:
    >
    > > When I was there, he was working on a Canon that had been dropped in
    > > salt water by a nature photographer. I was kind of surprised by his
    > > advice on what to do if you drop your camera in salt water:
    > > immediately put it in a bucket of fresh water, leave it in the bucket
    > > of water and take it in for repair immediately.

    >
    > That's been the standard advice ever since I first read about it in the
    > 1970s.


    Yep. If it's already full of water, drying it without getting the salt
    out of it will do more harm than leaving it in the water.
     
    J. Clarke, Feb 25, 2012
    #11
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