NIKON - MADE IN ?!?

Discussion in 'Digital Photography' started by BROZ, Feb 15, 2007.

  1. BROZ

    BROZ Guest

    Hello!
    Is it important what's the origin of a camera (D200 or D80)?
    I mean like Made in Taiwan or Made in Japan? Is there a difference?
    Thanx
    M
    BROZ, Feb 15, 2007
    #1
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  2. In article <er096a$mmu$-com.hr>,
    "BROZ" <> wrote:

    > Hello!
    > Is it important what's the origin of a camera (D200 or D80)?
    > I mean like Made in Taiwan or Made in Japan? Is there a difference?
    > Thanx
    > M


    My D50 was made in Thailand.

    Still a solid performer. Have never seen any comparisons of where a
    Nikon was made.

    --
    "When fascism comes to America, it will be wrapped in the flag and
    carrying a cross."
    Sinclair Lewis
    Ockham's Razor, Feb 15, 2007
    #2
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  3. BROZ

    JohnR66 Guest

    "BROZ" <> wrote in message
    news:er096a$mmu$-com.hr...
    > Hello!
    > Is it important what's the origin of a camera (D200 or D80)?
    > I mean like Made in Taiwan or Made in Japan? Is there a difference?
    > Thanx
    > M

    No. It depends only on the quality control at the Nikon factory without
    regard to the local.
    John
    JohnR66, Feb 15, 2007
    #3
  4. BROZ

    Guest

    On Feb 14, 9:40 pm, "JohnR66" <> wrote:
    > "BROZ" <> wrote in message
    >
    > news:er096a$mmu$-com.hr...> Hello!
    > > Is it important what's the origin of a camera (D200 or D80)?
    > > I mean like Made in Taiwan or Made in Japan? Is there a difference?
    > > Thanx
    > > M

    >
    > No. It depends only on the quality control at the Nikon factory without
    > regard to the local.
    > John


    I don't know if this is 100% true. Some products which are made in
    Japan usually have better control in terms of quality. In the past I
    noticed that this product usually have better fit, smooth finish, etc.
    I still trusted my older Lexus which was made in the Japan, than the
    newer one which is assembled in North America.
    The only cameras which are written made in Japan are the high end of
    Canon (S3 IS, G7, DSLR, perhaps other series too, etc). Panasonic
    Lumix is also made in Japan (at least the high end, such as DSLR,
    FZ30/50 series).
    , Feb 15, 2007
    #4
  5. BROZ wrote:
    > Hello!
    > Is it important what's the origin of a camera (D200 or D80)?
    > I mean like Made in Taiwan or Made in Japan? Is there a difference?
    > Thanx
    > M


    Satellite factories abroad are normally merely assemby factories and use
    components actually made in the country of origin.

    Since assembly is more or less unskilled these days, or in some cases highly
    automated, and is interspersed with stringent intermediate quality control
    points, it is doubtful whether you could tell the difference between a Nikon
    assembled in Taiwan or one assembled in Japan.

    Final inspection is one area that could make a difference however.

    Dennis.
    Dennis Pogson, Feb 15, 2007
    #5
  6. BROZ

    Psst Guest

    On Thu, 15 Feb 2007 01:23:41 +0100, "BROZ" <>
    wrote:

    >Hello!
    >Is it important what's the origin of a camera (D200 or D80)?
    >I mean like Made in Taiwan or Made in Japan? Is there a difference?
    >Thanx
    >M
    >

    Probably not. What is important is where your food comes from,but then
    no one seems too bothered about that.
    Psst, Feb 15, 2007
    #6
  7. BROZ

    Tim Guest

    > On Thu, 15 Feb 2007 01:23:41 +0100, "BROZ" <>
    > wrote:
    >
    >> Hello!
    >> Is it important what's the origin of a camera (D200 or D80)?
    >> I mean like Made in Taiwan or Made in Japan? Is there a difference?
    >> Thanx
    >> M
    >>

    > Probably not. What is important is where your food comes from,but then
    > no one seems too bothered about that.


    Yep people are kinda weird like that :-(
    --
    http://www.timdenning.myby.co.uk/
    Tim, Feb 15, 2007
    #7
  8. BROZ

    C J Campbell Guest

    On Wed, 14 Feb 2007 16:23:41 -0800, BROZ wrote
    (in article <er096a$mmu$-com.hr>):

    > Hello!
    > Is it important what's the origin of a camera (D200 or D80)?
    > I mean like Made in Taiwan or Made in Japan? Is there a difference?
    > Thanx
    > M
    >
    >


    I would like to see a D200 made in either of those countries. The assembly
    plant is in Thailand.

    --
    Waddling Eagle
    World Famous Flight Instructor
    C J Campbell, Feb 15, 2007
    #8
  9. BROZ

    tomm42 Guest

    On Feb 14, 7:23 pm, "BROZ" <> wrote:
    > Hello!
    > Is it important what's the origin of a camera (D200 or D80)?
    > I mean like Made in Taiwan or Made in Japan? Is there a difference?
    > Thanx
    > M



    The Nikon D200 and D80 are both made in Thailand. None have been made
    in Japan.

    Tom
    tomm42, Feb 15, 2007
    #9
  10. BROZ

    JohnR66 Guest

    <> wrote in message
    news:...
    > On Feb 14, 9:40 pm, "JohnR66" <> wrote:
    >> "BROZ" <> wrote in message
    >>
    >> news:er096a$mmu$-com.hr...> Hello!
    >> > Is it important what's the origin of a camera (D200 or D80)?
    >> > I mean like Made in Taiwan or Made in Japan? Is there a difference?
    >> > Thanx
    >> > M

    >>
    >> No. It depends only on the quality control at the Nikon factory without
    >> regard to the local.
    >> John

    >
    > I don't know if this is 100% true. Some products which are made in
    > Japan usually have better control in terms of quality. In the past I
    > noticed that this product usually have better fit, smooth finish, etc.
    > I still trusted my older Lexus which was made in the Japan, than the
    > newer one which is assembled in North America.
    > The only cameras which are written made in Japan are the high end of
    > Canon (S3 IS, G7, DSLR, perhaps other series too, etc). Panasonic
    > Lumix is also made in Japan (at least the high end, such as DSLR,
    > FZ30/50 series).
    >

    Perhaps, but the manual assembly is limited to putting the compenents of the
    camera together. It all depends on the design for the covers and the
    engeneering to properly makean accurate fit. If screw holes don't line up
    causing a poor fit, it more of fault of the mold design. The person putting
    the screw in has no control over that. Lens assembly is a critical area
    where design and assembly are critical to good performance.
    JohnR66, Feb 15, 2007
    #10
  11. BROZ

    Just D Guest

    "JohnR66"
    > Perhaps, but the manual assembly is limited to putting the compenents of
    > the camera together. It all depends on the design for the covers and the
    > engeneering to properly makean accurate fit. If screw holes don't line up
    > causing a poor fit, it more of fault of the mold design. The person
    > putting the screw in has no control over that. Lens assembly is a critical
    > area where design and assembly are critical to good performance.


    Even if the manual assembly is limited I'd say the country affects the final
    product too much. I have no idea in particular about Nikons, but I made a
    low-level comparison of different hard drives (Quantum Fireball) created in
    a different countries many years ago when this brand was still alive. One
    smart Russian guy (from Fidonet :)) wrote a program to show the number of
    defective clusters hid in the IDE HD reserved area. For those who have no
    idea what does it mean just a few words. I'm not talking now about the
    primitive first generation of the first hard drives. The more advanced IDE
    drives are smart enough to hide the defective sectors even on the fly
    replacing (actually remapping them) with the ones taken from the reserved
    space on the same hard drive. All hard drives are having bad sectors, maybe
    it's a secret for most of the people, but it's true. When you buy a new hard
    drive these bad sectors are usually remapped so that you will never be able
    to notice that until you use a low-lever utility able to read the remapped
    info from the hard drive showing the map of the bad and remapped sectors.
    This tool should work from DOS only, no Windows or other systems are not
    allowed because this utility works with the HD controller directly. Another
    one method around this^ tool to get the quality of the hard drive pretty
    quickly is the graphical tool also working from DOS without cache or
    something. This tool was just reading the hard drive cylinder by cylinder
    showing the reading speed. All latest hard drives are having Zones, that's
    clear and all these zones are visible as the stairs, jumps on the graph
    provided by the second too. But there is another kind of jumps. IF the hard
    drive sees the call to the defective sector which is remapped it
    automatically jumps to the remapped sector, reads it and then returns back
    to the next one. If that happens then we see the gaps on the graph,
    sometimes very significant gaps decreasing the reading speed. Also if the
    hard drive is not quiet enough we'll head these jumps after some experience.
    That's it. SO what I got testing these hard drives?

    1. Japan - took two hard drives, 3.4% and 4.2% of the reserved space was
    remapped, so almost the whole reserved space was not used, very good quality
    of the drives.
    2. Ireland - took three hard drives, 12%, 14% and 17% of reserved space was
    used for remapping of the bad sectors.
    3. Malaysia - Pretty close to 2^.
    4. India - took two hard drives, 37% and 43% of the reserved space was
    already used. In general very noisy hard drives since a lot of jumps to the
    remapped sectors. Also these jumps decrease the total life of these drives,
    not only affect the real read/write speed.

    You can make your own conclusions yourselves. Just keep in mind that the
    factories assembling these hard drives were just located in different
    countries. All hard drives were of the same model, brand new, just taken
    from the store.

    I don't think that it's possible to significantly hide the sensor defects,
    but the dust, the quality of the assembling, etc, could be a serious issue.

    Just D.
    Just D, Feb 15, 2007
    #11
  12. BROZ

    Guest

    On Feb 15, 5:59 pm, "Just D" <> wrote:
    > "JohnR66"
    >
    > > Perhaps, but the manual assembly is limited to putting the compenents of
    > > the camera together. It all depends on the design for the covers and the
    > > engeneering to properly makean accurate fit. If screw holes don't line up
    > > causing a poor fit, it more of fault of the mold design. The person
    > > putting the screw in has no control over that. Lens assembly is a critical
    > > area where design and assembly are critical to good performance.

    >
    > Even if the manual assembly is limited I'd say the country affects the final
    > product too much. I have no idea in particular about Nikons, but I made a
    > low-level comparison of different hard drives (Quantum Fireball) created in
    > a different countries many years ago when this brand was still alive. One
    > smart Russian guy (from Fidonet :)) wrote a program to show the number of
    > defective clusters hid in the IDE HD reserved area. For those who have no
    > idea what does it mean just a few words. I'm not talking now about the
    > primitive first generation of the first hard drives. The more advanced IDE
    > drives are smart enough to hide the defective sectors even on the fly
    > replacing (actually remapping them) with the ones taken from the reserved
    > space on the same hard drive. All hard drives are having bad sectors, maybe
    > it's a secret for most of the people, but it's true. When you buy a new hard
    > drive these bad sectors are usually remapped so that you will never be able
    > to notice that until you use a low-lever utility able to read the remapped
    > info from the hard drive showing the map of the bad and remapped sectors.
    > This tool should work from DOS only, no Windows or other systems are not
    > allowed because this utility works with the HD controller directly. Another
    > one method around this^ tool to get the quality of the hard drive pretty
    > quickly is the graphical tool also working from DOS without cache or
    > something. This tool was just reading the hard drive cylinder by cylinder
    > showing the reading speed. All latest hard drives are having Zones, that's
    > clear and all these zones are visible as the stairs, jumps on the graph
    > provided by the second too. But there is another kind of jumps. IF the hard
    > drive sees the call to the defective sector which is remapped it
    > automatically jumps to the remapped sector, reads it and then returns back
    > to the next one. If that happens then we see the gaps on the graph,
    > sometimes very significant gaps decreasing the reading speed. Also if the
    > hard drive is not quiet enough we'll head these jumps after some experience.
    > That's it. SO what I got testing these hard drives?
    >
    > 1. Japan - took two hard drives, 3.4% and 4.2% of the reserved space was
    > remapped, so almost the whole reserved space was not used, very good quality
    > of the drives.
    > 2. Ireland - took three hard drives, 12%, 14% and 17% of reserved space was
    > used for remapping of the bad sectors.
    > 3. Malaysia - Pretty close to 2^.
    > 4. India - took two hard drives, 37% and 43% of the reserved space was
    > already used. In general very noisy hard drives since a lot of jumps to the
    > remapped sectors. Also these jumps decrease the total life of these drives,
    > not only affect the real read/write speed.
    >
    > You can make your own conclusions yourselves. Just keep in mind that the
    > factories assembling these hard drives were just located in different
    > countries. All hard drives were of the same model, brand new, just taken
    > from the store.
    >
    > I don't think that it's possible to significantly hide the sensor defects,
    > but the dust, the quality of the assembling, etc, could be a serious issue.
    >
    > Just D.


    That was quite an explanation. Anyway, it shows that there are
    variations between quality from plant in one country and the other. It
    may just be a matter of management, and good quality control. It boils
    down for prestige, cost and money. It the product is your centrepiece,
    you want to have it near your design center, in case problem of
    retooling, etc can be reported, redesigned and changed quickly.
    Consider this:
    1. In the 1970s, Australian Holden car was assembled in another
    country. But quality was bad in the assembly line. Instead of 6 nuts,
    they only place 5 nuts (perhaps they keep the extra nut and sell in
    the market). as a result, Holden name dropped and noone wants to buy
    that car in the country. Even until now, the Holden name appears to
    have negative impression of poor quality.
    2. How do you know that the assembly line in the third world country
    for a reknown "widget" brand "Soho", in which strict quality control
    was used. At the end of the day, the local company also does
    "moonlighting", and produces identical "widget" named 'Soko". However,
    during the shift, they resupply the nuts with inferior quality nuts.
    At the end of the shift, before the company will start with the "Soho"
    line again, some of those inferior nuts left in the bin, and the new
    worker uses them for the "soho" widget. As a result, some Soho widget
    uses inferior parts and may fail sooner.... This is just fictional
    example. Names are fictional, but it can happen. Greedy people wants
    to make a buck... using the tools from "Soho" to make "Soko" will make
    them rich.... and no one from Soho management in Japan knows, as it is
    far away from home. They did not realize that the factory runs 24
    hours a day, instead the regular 12 hours.
    , Feb 16, 2007
    #12
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