Nikon D80 vs Nikon D200

Discussion in 'Digital Photography' started by davek57, Jun 15, 2007.

  1. davek57

    davek57 Guest

    I have a D50 and love its light weight and stellar metering. But I'm
    not sure it's a combat-ready body. I'm considering the D80 for its
    better metering, or the D200 so I don't have to worry about bonking it
    about. Any thoughts, opinions, watch-outs would be helpful.

    Thanks.

    -CD
    davek57, Jun 15, 2007
    #1
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  2. davek57

    nsag Guest

    The D200 may survive a tad more abuse than a D50 but that is not why most
    users would consider the upgrade.
    If you are satisfied with your D50 the two main differences you will find in
    the D80/200 are the vastly, vastly improved viewing system (worth the
    upgrade to me) and the larger sensor (which is not necessarily so
    overwhelmingly better for most uses that it justifies the upgrade).
    Focusing and metering systems will not be better if you are already
    satisfied with what you get in your D50. The options for jpeg processing are
    more sophisticated in 80/200s but if you shoot raw then you don't care about
    that either.
    nsag, Jun 15, 2007
    #2
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  3. In article <>,
    davek57 <> wrote:

    > I have a D50 and love its light weight and stellar metering. But I'm
    > not sure it's a combat-ready body. I'm considering the D80 for its
    > better metering, or the D200 so I don't have to worry about bonking it
    > about. Any thoughts, opinions, watch-outs would be helpful.


    The largest difference between the D50 and the 80/200 is the improved
    viewfinder. The biggest plus to the D200 is a sturdier body, but it's
    at the cost of about 1/2 lb. weight - and somewhere around 300 bucks.

    You really shouldn't be banging them around anyway; much as I like the
    D200 I think the D80 is a better value.
    Scott Schuckert, Jun 15, 2007
    #3
  4. davek57

    M-M Guest

    In article <150620071142266094%>,
    Scott Schuckert <> wrote:

    > The largest difference between the D50 and the 80/200 is the improved
    > viewfinder. The biggest plus to the D200 is a sturdier body, but it's
    > at the cost of about 1/2 lb. weight - and somewhere around 300 bucks.



    The D200 also has a faster continuous.

    --
    m-m
    M-M, Jun 15, 2007
    #4
  5. On Fri, 15 Jun 2007 11:42:26 -0400, Scott Schuckert <>
    wrote:

    >In article <>,
    >davek57 <> wrote:
    >
    >> I have a D50 and love its light weight and stellar metering. But I'm
    >> not sure it's a combat-ready body. I'm considering the D80 for its
    >> better metering, or the D200 so I don't have to worry about bonking it
    >> about. Any thoughts, opinions, watch-outs would be helpful.

    >
    >The largest difference between the D50 and the 80/200 is the improved
    >viewfinder. The biggest plus to the D200 is a sturdier body, but it's
    >at the cost of about 1/2 lb. weight - and somewhere around 300 bucks.
    >
    >You really shouldn't be banging them around anyway; much as I like the
    >D200 I think the D80 is a better value.


    And if you are wearing it around your neck for long, the weight
    difference is noticeable.
    Oliver Costich, Jun 15, 2007
    #5
  6. "Scott Schuckert" <> wrote in message news:150620071142266094%...
    > In article <>,
    > davek57 <> wrote:


    >> I have a D50 and love its light weight and stellar metering. But I'm
    >> not sure it's a combat-ready body. I'm considering the D80 for its
    >> better metering, or the D200 so I don't have to worry about bonking it
    >> about. Any thoughts, opinions, watch-outs would be helpful.


    > The largest difference between the D50 and the 80/200 is the improved
    > viewfinder. The biggest plus to the D200 is a sturdier body, but it's
    > at the cost of about 1/2 lb. weight - and somewhere around 300 bucks.


    The D200 can also meter with MF Nikkors, important for those of
    us with large collections of these (unlikely true for the OP, though - but
    there are many fine used MF Nikkors available at good prices).

    > You really shouldn't be banging them around anyway; much as I like the
    > D200 I think the D80 is a better value.


    And I prefer its smaller size and lower weight in addition to its "lighter"
    price...;-)
    --
    David Ruether

    http://www.donferrario.com/ruether
    David Ruether, Jun 15, 2007
    #6
  7. davek57

    frederick Guest

    davek57 wrote:
    > I'm considering the D80 for its
    > better metering.


    Does the D80 have "better metering" than the D50?
    I thought that they had the same system.
    Perhaps the D200 has a slightly better system for matrix / 3d colour
    matrix with more sensors.
    Perhaps the D80/D200 is better than the D50/70 for spot metering as it
    has more focus points (measured spot follows focus point selection with
    Nikon - depending on AF mode).
    Certainly the D200 has better metering for use with old MF AI lenses.
    I have read some negative comments about the D80 overexposing - but
    don't know if this is because default exposure is less conservative than
    for the D70/D200 (therefore more like the D50), or whether there's some
    reliability problem in some situations. If the former, then that's
    easily adjusted for. If the latter (which I doubt), then that's perhaps
    another reason to consider the D200. Testing with a borrowed D80, I
    couldn't see any problem at all.
    I've been using a D70, and as much as I'd like a D200, the faster frame
    rate, AF-s / AF-c selector, and metal body etc is of no benefit to me at
    all. The D70 has survived over two years of use/abuse with never a hint
    of a problem. But the higher res rear LCD with faster zoom/preview,
    shutter delay mode, and much better viewfinder are compelling reasons to
    get either the D80 or D200. Reviewing raw D70, D80, and D200 images,
    the D200 and D80 are AFAICT the same - and with good lenses they are
    very good indeed at low ISO, and options for NR in PP are better than
    two years ago for occasional high iso shooting. There's almost nothing
    at all in extra detail captured over the D70, but the almost complete
    absence of moire, aliasing, and demoisaicing artifacts seems to justify
    the higher resolution when printing large.
    frederick, Jun 15, 2007
    #7
  8. davek57

    Don Wiss Guest

    On Fri, 15 Jun 2007, David Ruether <> wrote:

    >"Scott Schuckert" <> wrote:
    >> The largest difference between the D50 and the 80/200 is the improved
    >> viewfinder. The biggest plus to the D200 is a sturdier body, but it's
    >> at the cost of about 1/2 lb. weight - and somewhere around 300 bucks.

    >
    >The D200 can also meter with MF Nikkors, important for those of
    >us with large collections of these (unlikely true for the OP, though - but
    >there are many fine used MF Nikkors available at good prices).


    I have a D200 and I do not have any old lens. The camera is heavy. Because
    of this I'm considering downgrading to a D80. Or wait for the D80
    successor. My suggestion to the OP is to only buy a D200 if you have old
    lens.

    David. I was up in Ithaca this past weekend. I did take some pictures.
    Eventually I'll get them on the web. I tried getting some birds in
    Sapsucker Woods, but 300 equivalent is not enough when out in the woods.

    Don <www.donwiss.com/pictures/> (e-mail link at page bottoms).
    Don Wiss, Jun 15, 2007
    #8
  9. davek57

    Joan Guest

    The sensor is the same size, just more pixels.

    --
    Joan
    http://www.flickr.com/photos/joan-in-manly

    "nsag" <> wrote in message
    news:57yci.3983$...
    : The D200 may survive a tad more abuse than a D50 but that is not why
    most
    : users would consider the upgrade.
    : If you are satisfied with your D50 the two main differences you will
    find in
    : the D80/200 are the vastly, vastly improved viewing system (worth
    the
    : upgrade to me) and the larger sensor (which is not necessarily so
    : overwhelmingly better for most uses that it justifies the upgrade).
    : Focusing and metering systems will not be better if you are already
    : satisfied with what you get in your D50. The options for jpeg
    processing are
    : more sophisticated in 80/200s but if you shoot raw then you don't
    care about
    : that either.
    :
    :
    Joan, Jun 15, 2007
    #9
  10. davek57

    Don Wiss Guest

    On Fri, 15 Jun 2007 14:57:03 -0000, davek57 <> wrote:

    > I'm considering the D80 for its
    >better metering, or the D200 so I don't have to worry about bonking it
    >about. Any thoughts, opinions, watch-outs would be helpful.


    I've come across another advantage to a D80 over a D200. I have a new
    laptop. The laptop has an Express Card slot instead of the usual PCMCIA
    slot. See: http://www.expresscard.org/web/site/

    In summary the slot is smaller and faster. The laptop came with a card that
    reads SD and similar memory cards. But Compact Flash cards are too big (the
    laptop has to read through a USB card reader). So a good reason for me to
    switch to an SD camera.

    Don <www.donwiss.com/pictures/> (e-mail link at page bottoms).
    Don Wiss, Jun 16, 2007
    #10
  11. davek57

    Joan Guest

    Check whether the express card reads SDHC before buying any for the
    D80.

    --
    Joan
    http://www.flickr.com/photos/joan-in-manly

    "Don Wiss" <donwiss@no_spam.com> wrote in message
    news:...
    : On Fri, 15 Jun 2007 14:57:03 -0000, davek57 <>
    wrote:
    :
    : > I'm considering the D80 for its
    : >better metering, or the D200 so I don't have to worry about bonking
    it
    : >about. Any thoughts, opinions, watch-outs would be helpful.
    :
    : I've come across another advantage to a D80 over a D200. I have a
    new
    : laptop. The laptop has an Express Card slot instead of the usual
    PCMCIA
    : slot. See: http://www.expresscard.org/web/site/
    :
    : In summary the slot is smaller and faster. The laptop came with a
    card that
    : reads SD and similar memory cards. But Compact Flash cards are too
    big (the
    : laptop has to read through a USB card reader). So a good reason for
    me to
    : switch to an SD camera.
    :
    : Don <www.donwiss.com/pictures/> (e-mail link at page bottoms).
    Joan, Jun 16, 2007
    #11
  12. "Don Wiss" <donwiss@no_spam.com> wrote in message news:...
    > On Fri, 15 Jun 2007, David Ruether <> wrote:
    >>"Scott Schuckert" <> wrote:


    >>> The largest difference between the D50 and the 80/200 is the improved
    >>> viewfinder. The biggest plus to the D200 is a sturdier body, but it's
    >>> at the cost of about 1/2 lb. weight - and somewhere around 300 bucks.


    >>The D200 can also meter with MF Nikkors, important for those of
    >>us with large collections of these (unlikely true for the OP, though - but
    >>there are many fine used MF Nikkors available at good prices).


    > I have a D200 and I do not have any old lens. The camera is heavy. Because
    > of this I'm considering downgrading to a D80. Or wait for the D80
    > successor. My suggestion to the OP is to only buy a D200 if you have old
    > lens.
    >
    > David. I was up in Ithaca this past weekend. I did take some pictures.
    > Eventually I'll get them on the web. I tried getting some birds in
    > Sapsucker Woods, but 300 equivalent is not enough when out in the woods.
    >
    > Don <www.donwiss.com/pictures/> (e-mail link at page bottoms)


    The "nasty joke" around here is that the bird sanctuaries don't have any
    birds in them - we go to them for the beautiful woods and board-walks
    over swamps...;-) Cornell's "Bird Lab" is a great one, though, with a
    wonderful collection of bird and other sounds. Cornell's gardens and
    plantations are also notable and we visit them often, but the main attractions
    are the countless multitudes of waterfalls and the glens and gorges all
    over the place (I also like the rolling hills and farmlands) - with four
    amazing state parks in Ithaca and another in nearby Watkins Glen. I
    think this area should have been a national park - its scenic feature
    density and numbers exceed those of several eastern national parks,
    with only Maine's Acadia and New York's Niagara Falls really able
    to compete with this area for number of natural items to see (and one
    of our waterfalls is considerably higher than Niagara, with two others
    close...;-). The scenery is why I kept returning to Ithaca to live and
    finally "stuck" here, even though the weather is terrible...;-) BTW,
    if you return to Ithaca and aren't familiar with the area, holler and I can
    tell you the best places to go (but not for birds - the dumpster at the
    old Bird Lab used to be the best place for that...;-).
    --
    David Ruether

    http://www.donferrario.com/ruether
    David Ruether, Jun 16, 2007
    #12
  13. "Don Wiss" <donwiss@no_spam.com> wrote in message
    news:...
    > On Fri, 15 Jun 2007 14:57:03 -0000, davek57 <> wrote:
    >
    >> I'm considering the D80 for its
    >>better metering, or the D200 so I don't have to worry about bonking it
    >>about. Any thoughts, opinions, watch-outs would be helpful.

    >
    > I've come across another advantage to a D80 over a D200. I have a new
    > laptop. The laptop has an Express Card slot instead of the usual PCMCIA
    > slot. See: http://www.expresscard.org/web/site/
    >
    > In summary the slot is smaller and faster. The laptop came with a card
    > that
    > reads SD and similar memory cards. But Compact Flash cards are too big
    > (the
    > laptop has to read through a USB card reader). So a good reason for me to
    > switch to an SD camera.


    Also, many laptops now come with slots that accept SD cards and some similar
    memory cards directly. My new Acer laptop has that and it's really the most
    convenient thing for digital camera use. My nephew's laptop (a year or so
    old) has a slot for an SD card too.

    Neil
    Neil Harrington, Jun 16, 2007
    #13
  14. davek57

    Don Wiss Guest

    On Sat, 16 Jun 2007 18:16:39 +1000, "oan <2> wrote:

    >Check whether the express card reads SDHC before buying any for the
    >D80.


    It looks like it does not:

    Multimedia Card Reader Supports Memory Stick Duo™ media with MagicGate®
    functionality ExpressCard™/34 Slot: 5-in-1 Memory Card Adaptor (VGP-MCA20)
    supporting Memory Stick®, Memory Stick PRO™, Secure Digital, xD-Picture
    Card, and MultiMediaCard (MMC)

    I've only had Compact Flash. I do not know the differences between the
    others. Is the SDHC larger?

    Don <www.donwiss.com/pictures/> (e-mail link at page bottoms).
    Don Wiss, Jun 16, 2007
    #14
  15. Don Wiss wrote:
    > I've only had Compact Flash. I do not know the differences between the
    > others. Is the SDHC larger?


    Yepp, that is the curse of inferiour technology. The CF card interface is
    the same as PCMCIA and thus can accomodate pretty much any memory size.
    The SD card interface on the other hand is based on the ancient floppy disc
    standard. Therefore every single time when memory technology unexpectedly
    reaches the next level you need a new updated standard to accomodate those
    new unexpected sizes.

    A sure way to cause a lot of confusion and to wash money into manufacturers
    and dealers pockets because people need to by new equiqment because the old
    equipment doesn't know how to handle the new standard.

    jue
    Jürgen Exner, Jun 16, 2007
    #15
  16. davek57

    John Smith Guest

    "Jürgen Exner" <> wrote in message
    news:RgUci.574$u65.207@trndny07...
    > Don Wiss wrote:
    >> I've only had Compact Flash. I do not know the differences between the
    >> others. Is the SDHC larger?

    >
    > Yepp, that is the curse of inferiour technology. The CF card interface is
    > the same as PCMCIA and thus can accomodate pretty much any memory size.
    > The SD card interface on the other hand is based on the ancient floppy
    > disc standard. Therefore every single time when memory technology
    > unexpectedly reaches the next level you need a new updated standard to
    > accomodate those new unexpected sizes.
    >
    > A sure way to cause a lot of confusion and to wash money into
    > manufacturers and dealers pockets because people need to by new equiqment
    > because the old equipment doesn't know how to handle the new standard.
    >
    > jue
    >


    I'm really ignorant here, but what in heaven's name does a new SDHC card
    have to do with a floppy disk. And what does this have to do with the size
    (2gb, 4gb, 8gb, etc) of a SDHC card?
    John Smith, Jun 16, 2007
    #16
  17. davek57

    nospam Guest

    In article <RgUci.574$u65.207@trndny07>, Jürgen Exner
    <> wrote:

    > Don Wiss wrote:
    > > I've only had Compact Flash. I do not know the differences between the
    > > others. Is the SDHC larger?

    >
    > Yepp, that is the curse of inferiour technology. The CF card interface is
    > the same as PCMCIA and thus can accomodate pretty much any memory size.
    > The SD card interface on the other hand is based on the ancient floppy disc
    > standard. Therefore every single time when memory technology unexpectedly
    > reaches the next level you need a new updated standard to accomodate those
    > new unexpected sizes.


    you are thinking of smartmedia, not sd cards.
    nospam, Jun 16, 2007
    #17
  18. On Fri, 15 Jun 2007 16:27:47 -0400, "David Ruether"
    <> wrote:

    >
    >
    >"Scott Schuckert" <> wrote in message news:150620071142266094%...
    >> In article <>,
    >> davek57 <> wrote:

    >
    >>> I have a D50 and love its light weight and stellar metering. But I'm
    >>> not sure it's a combat-ready body. I'm considering the D80 for its
    >>> better metering, or the D200 so I don't have to worry about bonking it
    >>> about. Any thoughts, opinions, watch-outs would be helpful.

    >
    >> The largest difference between the D50 and the 80/200 is the improved
    >> viewfinder. The biggest plus to the D200 is a sturdier body, but it's
    >> at the cost of about 1/2 lb. weight - and somewhere around 300 bucks.

    >
    >The D200 can also meter with MF Nikkors, important for those of
    >us with large collections of these (unlikely true for the OP, though - but
    >there are many fine used MF Nikkors available at good prices).
    >
    >> You really shouldn't be banging them around anyway; much as I like the
    >> D200 I think the D80 is a better value.

    >
    >And I prefer its smaller size and lower weight in addition to its "lighter"
    >price...;-)



    I bought a D80 body and a 70-300 VR II lense for about the price of a
    D200 body. Lens I tend to keep a while but bodies get changed with
    some frequency.
    Oliver Costich, Jun 16, 2007
    #18
  19. davek57

    Joan Guest

    My 2 year old Toshiba P30 has an SD slot but doesn't read SDHC. I
    bought a 4GB SDHC card with a reader in the package from B&H.

    --
    Joan
    http://www.flickr.com/photos/joan-in-manly

    "Neil Harrington" <> wrote in message
    news:...
    :
    :
    : Also, many laptops now come with slots that accept SD cards and some
    similar
    : memory cards directly. My new Acer laptop has that and it's really
    the most
    : convenient thing for digital camera use. My nephew's laptop (a year
    or so
    : old) has a slot for an SD card too.
    :
    : Neil
    :
    :
    Joan, Jun 17, 2007
    #19
  20. davek57

    Roger (K8RI) Guest

    On Fri, 15 Jun 2007 14:02:25 -0400, Oliver Costich
    <> wrote:

    >On Fri, 15 Jun 2007 11:42:26 -0400, Scott Schuckert <>
    >wrote:
    >
    >>In article <>,
    >>davek57 <> wrote:
    >>
    >>> I have a D50 and love its light weight and stellar metering. But I'm
    >>> not sure it's a combat-ready body. I'm considering the D80 for its
    >>> better metering, or the D200 so I don't have to worry about bonking it
    >>> about. Any thoughts, opinions, watch-outs would be helpful.

    >>
    >>The largest difference between the D50 and the 80/200 is the improved
    >>viewfinder. The biggest plus to the D200 is a sturdier body, but it's
    >>at the cost of about 1/2 lb. weight - and somewhere around 300 bucks.
    >>
    >>You really shouldn't be banging them around anyway; much as I like the
    >>D200 I think the D80 is a better value.

    >
    >And if you are wearing it around your neck for long, the weight
    >difference is noticeable.


    After carrying around an F4S for years the 200 is a
    featherweight.<:))
    Roger (K8RI), Jun 17, 2007
    #20
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