Nikon D80 vs Canon XTI

Discussion in 'Digital Photography' started by measekite, Sep 11, 2006.

  1. measekite

    measekite Guest

    I am torn between both cameras. I like many of the features of the
    Nikon D80 BUT:

    The dust removal system of the Canon seems like a very important
    feature. Just how much of a problem is dust if you change lenses
    frequently?

    Some prelim reviews claim that the Canon has a faster and more accurate
    auto focus. Comments Please.

    As for Nikon D80


    Some say that the color is more of a mutes pastel and appears richer.


    The D80 has the ability to turn on a grid helping out with composition
    according to the rule of thirds.
    Anyone think this is more important to have over the long term than a
    dust removal system?

    Some say that Nikon and their lenses have somewhat better construction.
    Comments Please

    I guess the bottom line is how they feel in your hands. Is that the
    most important criteria?


    How does one decide or it may be a moot point in 2 years when the next
    round of camera is shipped. I think that by then Nikon will wake up.

    However, they did have a 1/500 flash sync that they removed. I hate it
    when features are taken away on future cameras.
    measekite, Sep 11, 2006
    #1
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  2. measekite

    ink Guest

    "measekite" wrote

    My 2c: (I'm a Nikon user, so I may be a bit biased, but I'll try to be
    objective)

    >I am torn between both cameras. I like many of the features of the Nikon
    >D80 BUT:
    >
    > The dust removal system of the Canon seems like a very important feature.
    > Just how much of a problem is dust if you change lenses frequently?


    It's not much of a problem, honestly. I would love to have an automatic dust
    removal system, but I've cleaned my D70 once in the two years I've owned it,
    it was a 3 minute thing with the right tools. And I'm not a very versed
    person in things small and fiddly.

    > Some prelim reviews claim that the Canon has a faster and more accurate
    > auto focus. Comments Please.


    I can't really comment on that, other than that I'm happy with the autofocus
    on the D70 and the D200. It's sometimes (not always) also a function of the
    lens, if you don't have AFS or USM lenses. I have the 18-70 kit lens which
    has AFS, and it's quick and snappy on both cameras, whereas the old 70-300G
    lens hunts for focus on D70, D200 and F100. I have to admit, though, that I
    very much like the Nikon autofocus system in general.

    >
    > As for Nikon D80
    >
    >
    > Some say that the color is more of a mutes pastel and appears richer.


    I haven't seen many pics from the D80 yet - I'm waiting for the full preview
    on some websites. There have been threads in this ng which pointed to
    galleries of sample pics.

    > The D80 has the ability to turn on a grid helping out with composition
    > according to the rule of thirds.
    > Anyone think this is more important to have over the long term than a dust
    > removal system?


    A dust removal system and a "composition help" are two fundamentally
    different things. I absolutely love the on-demand grid lines, they help me a
    lot to keep my photos straight. I think that's a very helpful feature, but
    that's just me. Pro's may not need it, but I as an amateur certainly think I
    do.

    > Some say that Nikon and their lenses have somewhat better construction.
    > Comments Please


    I think, both Canon and Nikon make very rugged cameras in the "higher
    class", and both make cameras that are less well built, but still very good.
    The Nikons tend to be a bit heavier and bulkier (IIRC), but this has never
    been a problem for me. The D100 or F100 are built like tanks, the D70 would
    have profited from a bit more environmental sealing.

    > I guess the bottom line is how they feel in your hands. Is that the most
    > important criteria?


    It may not be the most important, but it is VERY important, believe me.
    Before I went the Nikon route (back in the film days), I tried to handle as
    many camera brands as I could to make up my mind. It just so happened that
    the Nikons tended to feel good in my hands, the controls were in all the
    right places (with some exceptions, though nothing critical) and the weight
    and bulk felt "just right" for me. That, in combination with all other
    considerations, was an important part in the decision making process.

    > How does one decide or it may be a moot point in 2 years when the next
    > round of camera is shipped. I think that by then Nikon will wake up.


    If you always want the newest, bestest digital camera, you'll be spending
    LOTS of money in the coming years. I've long been waiting for a camera like
    the D200, and I consider my getting the D70 a somewhat premature decision.
    I'm not in a bad situation now, the D200 being my primary camera, with the
    D70 as the backup body, should I need it. I think, pick the camera that
    satisfies your requirements with respect to image quality, ease of use,
    flexibility, handling etc. and then stick with it for as long as you can.
    The photographer takes the pictures, not the camera.

    > However, they did have a 1/500 flash sync that they removed. I hate it
    > when features are taken away on future cameras.


    So do I, but then cameras are aimed at a certain group of people (the
    companies of course want these groups to be as large as possible). I guess
    Nikon thought that for the intended audience, a flash sync speed of 1/250
    would be enough.

    I admit, not much useful information, but I hope it helps a bit.

    Cheers,
    ink
    ink, Sep 11, 2006
    #2
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  3. measekite

    ink Guest

    "ink" <> wrote in message
    news:ee3snk$t84$-plus.net...
    >
    >
    >> Some say that Nikon and their lenses have somewhat better construction.
    >> Comments Please

    >
    > I think, both Canon and Nikon make very rugged cameras in the "higher
    > class", and both make cameras that are less well built, but still very
    > good. The Nikons tend to be a bit heavier and bulkier (IIRC), but this has
    > never been a problem for me. The D100 or F100 are built like tanks, the
    > D70 would have profited from a bit more environmental sealing.


    Oops... you asked about lenses, not cameras.

    I think, the "mid-range" lenses (from a price point of view) that both
    manufacturers sell, are just great w.r.t. construction and quality. There
    are dogs in EVERY camera system, but you tend to recognize these very
    quickly once you handle them. As a general rule, get the best glass you can
    afford! No point in (as I did... shame on me!) putting a Samyang 19-35 on a
    F100 and then complaining about the lousy sharpness and the heavy flaring.
    The importance of good glass cannot be understated.

    HTH,
    ink
    ink, Sep 11, 2006
    #3
  4. measekite

    Bill Funk Guest

    On Mon, 11 Sep 2006 14:13:44 GMT, measekite <>
    wrote:

    >I am torn between both cameras. I like many of the features of the
    >Nikon D80 BUT:
    >
    >The dust removal system of the Canon seems like a very important
    >feature. Just how much of a problem is dust if you change lenses
    >frequently?


    I've watched dust (boredom is a terrible thing!); if the dust removal
    system were to be used in a situation where the camera was sitting in
    a table somewhere for several minutes after it was activated, maybe it
    would work. Instead, it's activated when you turn the camera on, and
    the camera is then moved around. The idea that any dust knocked off
    the sensor will somehow fall on a (vertical) sticky strip that's many
    time smaller than the sensor is, IMHO, ludicrous.
    ....
    >The D80 has the ability to turn on a grid helping out with composition
    >according to the rule of thirds.
    >Anyone think this is more important to have over the long term than a
    >dust removal system?


    IMO, if you can't visualize such a grid, it probably doesn't matter.
    >
    >Some say that Nikon and their lenses have somewhat better construction.
    >Comments Please


    True for some lenses, false for others. Both Canon and Nikon (or,
    Nikon and Canon, depending) make some really good lenses, and some
    not-so-good lenses.
    >
    >I guess the bottom line is how they feel in your hands. Is that the
    >most important criteria?


    Not most important, but important, yes. Certainly in the list of
    things to give major consideration to.
    >
    >
    >How does one decide or it may be a moot point in 2 years when the next
    >round of camera is shipped. I think that by then Nikon will wake up.


    You either buy now, or later.
    If you buy now, you get the benefit of what you buy. If you buy later,
    you get the benefit of nothing until later.
    Seems simple.
    There are those who will always wait for 'the next better thing." They
    miss out, in the hope that they will get their reward later.
    --
    Bill Funk
    replace "g" with "a"
    Bill Funk, Sep 11, 2006
    #4
  5. measekite

    measekite Guest

    Bill Funk wrote:

    >On Mon, 11 Sep 2006 14:13:44 GMT, measekite <>
    >wrote:
    >
    >
    >
    >>I am torn between both cameras. I like many of the features of the
    >>Nikon D80 BUT:
    >>
    >>The dust removal system of the Canon seems like a very important
    >>feature. Just how much of a problem is dust if you change lenses
    >>frequently?
    >>
    >>

    >
    >I've watched dust (boredom is a terrible thing!); if the dust removal
    >system were to be used in a situation where the camera was sitting in
    >a table somewhere for several minutes after it was activated, maybe it
    >would work. Instead, it's activated when you turn the camera on, and
    >the camera is then moved around. The idea that any dust knocked off
    >the sensor will somehow fall on a (vertical) sticky strip that's many
    >time smaller than the sensor is, IMHO, ludicrous.
    >
    >


    Assume the system works as advertised and then answer the question.

    >...
    >
    >
    >>The D80 has the ability to turn on a grid helping out with composition
    >>according to the rule of thirds.
    >>Anyone think this is more important to have over the long term than a
    >>dust removal system?
    >>
    >>

    >
    >IMO, if you can't visualize such a grid, it probably doesn't matter.
    >
    >


    But maybe it is an aid but how important of an assist?

    >>Some say that Nikon and their lenses have somewhat better construction.
    >>Comments Please
    >>
    >>

    >
    >True for some lenses, false for others. Both Canon and Nikon (or,
    >Nikon and Canon, depending) make some really good lenses, and some
    >not-so-good lenses.
    >
    >


    And for each company what the the good ones and what are the not so good
    ones. We are talking about Zooms and not the expensive L series or the
    Nikon counterpart. Also IS or VR lenses are important.

    >>I guess the bottom line is how they feel in your hands. Is that the
    >>most important criteria?
    >>
    >>

    >
    >Not most important, but important, yes. Certainly in the list of
    >things to give major consideration to.
    >
    >
    >>How does one decide or it may be a moot point in 2 years when the next
    >>round of camera is shipped. I think that by then Nikon will wake up.
    >>
    >>

    >
    >You either buy now, or later.
    >If you buy now, you get the benefit of what you buy. If you buy later,
    >you get the benefit of nothing until later.
    >Seems simple.
    >There are those who will always wait for 'the next better thing." They
    >miss out, in the hope that they will get their reward later.
    >
    >
    measekite, Sep 12, 2006
    #5
  6. measekite

    Bill Funk Guest

    On Tue, 12 Sep 2006 16:18:26 GMT, measekite <>
    wrote:

    >
    >
    >Bill Funk wrote:
    >
    >>On Mon, 11 Sep 2006 14:13:44 GMT, measekite <>
    >>wrote:
    >>
    >>
    >>
    >>>I am torn between both cameras. I like many of the features of the
    >>>Nikon D80 BUT:
    >>>
    >>>The dust removal system of the Canon seems like a very important
    >>>feature. Just how much of a problem is dust if you change lenses
    >>>frequently?
    >>>
    >>>

    >>
    >>I've watched dust (boredom is a terrible thing!); if the dust removal
    >>system were to be used in a situation where the camera was sitting in
    >>a table somewhere for several minutes after it was activated, maybe it
    >>would work. Instead, it's activated when you turn the camera on, and
    >>the camera is then moved around. The idea that any dust knocked off
    >>the sensor will somehow fall on a (vertical) sticky strip that's many
    >>time smaller than the sensor is, IMHO, ludicrous.
    >>
    >>

    >
    >Assume the system works as advertised and then answer the question.


    How can I make that assumption?
    To answer the questiuon Re: is dust much of a problem? That's been
    answered many times; dust is a problem, sometimes, but not anywhere as
    often as some make it out to be.
    I've had two DSLRs, and neither has had a dust problem yet. In
    Phoenix, which is dusty, but I haven't been on a safari in Africa,
    either.
    Will the dust shaker work? My observations of dust say no, it won't.
    Dust doesn't fall neatly down, to stick to a vertical sticky strip.
    What's to keep it from sticking to the sensor, again, which is bigger
    than the sticky strip?
    >
    >>...
    >>
    >>
    >>>The D80 has the ability to turn on a grid helping out with composition
    >>>according to the rule of thirds.
    >>>Anyone think this is more important to have over the long term than a
    >>>dust removal system?
    >>>
    >>>

    >>
    >>IMO, if you can't visualize such a grid, it probably doesn't matter.
    >>
    >>

    >
    >But maybe it is an aid but how important of an assist?


    Imagine the grid; it's not hard to do. Really.
    >
    >>>Some say that Nikon and their lenses have somewhat better construction.
    >>>Comments Please
    >>>
    >>>

    >>
    >>True for some lenses, false for others. Both Canon and Nikon (or,
    >>Nikon and Canon, depending) make some really good lenses, and some
    >>not-so-good lenses.
    >>
    >>

    >
    >And for each company what the the good ones and what are the not so good
    >ones. We are talking about Zooms and not the expensive L series or the
    >Nikon counterpart. Also IS or VR lenses are important.


    I'm not sure what you're trying to say, here.
    There are many reviews of the lenses that are available.
    --
    Bill Funk
    replace "g" with "a"
    Bill Funk, Sep 12, 2006
    #6
  7. measekite

    sid derra Guest

    "Bill Funk" <> wrote in message
    news:...
    > On Tue, 12 Sep 2006 16:18:26 GMT, measekite <>
    > wrote:
    >
    >>
    >>
    >>Bill Funk wrote:
    >>
    >>>On Mon, 11 Sep 2006 14:13:44 GMT, measekite <>
    >>>wrote:
    >>>
    >>>
    >>>
    >>>>I am torn between both cameras. I like many of the features of the
    >>>>Nikon D80 BUT:
    >>>>
    >>>>The dust removal system of the Canon seems like a very important
    >>>>feature. Just how much of a problem is dust if you change lenses
    >>>>frequently?
    >>>>
    >>>>
    >>>
    >>>I've watched dust (boredom is a terrible thing!); if the dust removal
    >>>system were to be used in a situation where the camera was sitting in
    >>>a table somewhere for several minutes after it was activated, maybe it
    >>>would work. Instead, it's activated when you turn the camera on, and
    >>>the camera is then moved around. The idea that any dust knocked off
    >>>the sensor will somehow fall on a (vertical) sticky strip that's many
    >>>time smaller than the sensor is, IMHO, ludicrous.
    >>>
    >>>

    >>
    >>Assume the system works as advertised and then answer the question.

    >
    > How can I make that assumption?
    > To answer the questiuon Re: is dust much of a problem? That's been
    > answered many times; dust is a problem, sometimes, but not anywhere as
    > often as some make it out to be.
    > I've had two DSLRs, and neither has had a dust problem yet. In
    > Phoenix, which is dusty, but I haven't been on a safari in Africa,
    > either.
    > Will the dust shaker work? My observations of dust say no, it won't.
    > Dust doesn't fall neatly down, to stick to a vertical sticky strip.
    > What's to keep it from sticking to the sensor, again, which is bigger
    > than the sticky strip?


    well - if its ultrasound technology, i do assume it works. it does on the
    olys at least. mercedes even tested this technology for their windshields.
    sid derra, Sep 13, 2006
    #7
  8. measekite

    Bill Funk Guest

    On Wed, 13 Sep 2006 23:11:25 +0200, "sid derra"
    <> wrote:

    >"Bill Funk" <> wrote in message
    >news:...
    >> On Tue, 12 Sep 2006 16:18:26 GMT, measekite <>
    >> wrote:
    >>
    >>>
    >>>
    >>>Bill Funk wrote:
    >>>
    >>>>On Mon, 11 Sep 2006 14:13:44 GMT, measekite <>
    >>>>wrote:
    >>>>
    >>>>
    >>>>
    >>>>>I am torn between both cameras. I like many of the features of the
    >>>>>Nikon D80 BUT:
    >>>>>
    >>>>>The dust removal system of the Canon seems like a very important
    >>>>>feature. Just how much of a problem is dust if you change lenses
    >>>>>frequently?
    >>>>>
    >>>>>
    >>>>
    >>>>I've watched dust (boredom is a terrible thing!); if the dust removal
    >>>>system were to be used in a situation where the camera was sitting in
    >>>>a table somewhere for several minutes after it was activated, maybe it
    >>>>would work. Instead, it's activated when you turn the camera on, and
    >>>>the camera is then moved around. The idea that any dust knocked off
    >>>>the sensor will somehow fall on a (vertical) sticky strip that's many
    >>>>time smaller than the sensor is, IMHO, ludicrous.
    >>>>
    >>>>
    >>>
    >>>Assume the system works as advertised and then answer the question.

    >>
    >> How can I make that assumption?
    >> To answer the questiuon Re: is dust much of a problem? That's been
    >> answered many times; dust is a problem, sometimes, but not anywhere as
    >> often as some make it out to be.
    >> I've had two DSLRs, and neither has had a dust problem yet. In
    >> Phoenix, which is dusty, but I haven't been on a safari in Africa,
    >> either.
    >> Will the dust shaker work? My observations of dust say no, it won't.
    >> Dust doesn't fall neatly down, to stick to a vertical sticky strip.
    >> What's to keep it from sticking to the sensor, again, which is bigger
    >> than the sticky strip?

    >
    >well - if its ultrasound technology, i do assume it works. it does on the
    >olys at least. mercedes even tested this technology for their windshields.
    >


    It works? Can you back that up with anything more than a few Oly
    owners saying, "it seems to work"?
    I've had 2 DSLRs now, and I don't have a dust problem, so it's not
    needed. That's as legit as anything I've seen saying it works.
    So, it's ultrasonic; how does that mean it works?
    Are there any studies that actually show it works?
    Mercedes tested this for their windshields? And the results were what?
    And how is this pertinent? Windshields aren't in the same sort of
    environlemt as a sensor in a DSLR. I can use the windshield washer to
    clean my windshield; I suppose the 8D will have a sensor washer. :)
    --
    Bill Funk
    replace "g" with "a"
    Bill Funk, Sep 14, 2006
    #8
  9. measekite

    ASAAR Guest

    On Thu, 14 Sep 2006 09:22:27 -0700, Bill Funk wrote:

    > It works? Can you back that up with anything more than a few Oly
    > owners saying, "it seems to work"?
    > I've had 2 DSLRs now, and I don't have a dust problem, so it's not
    > needed. That's as legit as anything I've seen saying it works.
    > So, it's ultrasonic; how does that mean it works?
    > Are there any studies that actually show it works?
    > Mercedes tested this for their windshields? And the results were what?


    Mercedes says that it didn't work at all. On the other hand
    according to surveys, it noticeably changed their car's image.

    :)
    ASAAR, Sep 14, 2006
    #9
  10. measekite

    cjcampbell Guest

    measekite wrote:
    > I am torn between both cameras. I like many of the features of the
    > Nikon D80 BUT:
    >
    > The dust removal system of the Canon seems like a very important
    > feature. Just how much of a problem is dust if you change lenses
    > frequently?
    >


    Not a big problem. It is highly questionable whether Canon's system is
    even slightly more effective than a bulb blower.

    > Some prelim reviews claim that the Canon has a faster and more accurate
    > auto focus. Comments Please.
    >


    Few of us here have used both cameras, so it is hard to tell. Probably
    not a lot of difference.

    > As for Nikon D80
    >
    >
    > Some say that the color is more of a mutes pastel and appears richer.
    >


    My impression is that Canon cameras *by default* have more saturated
    color. But both cameras have menu settings which affect that
    considerably. You can produce a picture with Nikon that looks like a
    Canon picture and vice versa.

    >
    > The D80 has the ability to turn on a grid helping out with composition
    > according to the rule of thirds.


    A nice feature, but not essential. I don't think it is any more
    important than Canon's anti-dust feature.

    > Anyone think this is more important to have over the long term than a
    > dust removal system?
    >
    > Some say that Nikon and their lenses have somewhat better construction.
    > Comments Please
    >


    Some say that. Some say otherwise. Reviewers seem to give Nikon lenses
    the edge, but the differences are minor in any event.

    > I guess the bottom line is how they feel in your hands. Is that the
    > most important criteria?
    >


    Without question, ergonomics is the most important feature. Both
    cameras are highly dependent on menus to access important settings.
    This is not good. The more you can do with an easily accessible dial or
    button the better.

    >
    > How does one decide or it may be a moot point in 2 years when the next
    > round of camera is shipped. I think that by then Nikon will wake up.
    >


    Actually, Nikon introduced the first practical digital SLR. Nikon has
    been about six months ahead of Canon in the product development cycle
    ever since. That is not a huge difference, but when Canon claims to be
    more innovative, they are lying. No matter what camera you buy, a
    better one for less money will be available in six months. That is
    tough. If you plan on waiting until no more significant improvements
    are being made in digital cameras before buying one, you are going to
    have a very long wait. You can be sure that replacements for the D80
    and the XTI are already well into development and some protoypes may
    already have been manufactured.


    > However, they did have a 1/500 flash sync that they removed. I hate it
    > when features are taken away on future cameras.


    True
    cjcampbell, Sep 15, 2006
    #10
  11. Bill Funk wrote:

    > Will the dust shaker work? My observations of dust say no, it won't.
    > Dust doesn't fall neatly down, to stick to a vertical sticky strip.
    > What's to keep it from sticking to the sensor, again, which is bigger
    > than the sticky strip?

    The vibrations. The doesn can't rest until either the remover is switched
    off or the dust gets stuck.

    Volker
    Volker Hetzer, Sep 16, 2006
    #11
  12. measekite

    Bill Funk Guest

    On Sat, 16 Sep 2006 11:10:49 +0200, Volker Hetzer
    <> wrote:

    >Bill Funk wrote:
    >
    >> Will the dust shaker work? My observations of dust say no, it won't.
    >> Dust doesn't fall neatly down, to stick to a vertical sticky strip.
    >> What's to keep it from sticking to the sensor, again, which is bigger
    >> than the sticky strip?

    >The vibrations. The doesn can't rest until either the remover is switched
    >off or the dust gets stuck.
    >
    >Volker


    But what will make the dust stick to the sticky strip? Or, perhaps, I
    should say, why will the dust be attracted to the sticky strip?
    The vibrations will stop, the dust will be in the air. What will make
    it go somewhere besides wherever it wants to go?
    As I said, I've observed dust; it doesn't falll neatly down,
    especially when the air it's in is disturbed. The shaking of the
    sensor occurs when the camera is turned on, meaning it's probably in
    motion, and the air will be disturbed by the camera's motion. It will
    be disturbed more by the actuation of the shutter and mirror movement.
    Why would loose dust go to the sticky strip?
    It seems to me this is a gimmick, more or less forced on Canon by the
    "popularity" of the same gimmick in other cameras.
    --
    Bill Funk
    replace "g" with "a"
    Bill Funk, Sep 16, 2006
    #12
  13. Bill Funk wrote:
    > On Sat, 16 Sep 2006 11:10:49 +0200, Volker Hetzer
    > <> wrote:
    >
    >> Bill Funk wrote:
    >>
    >>> Will the dust shaker work? My observations of dust say no, it won't.
    >>> Dust doesn't fall neatly down, to stick to a vertical sticky strip.
    >>> What's to keep it from sticking to the sensor, again, which is bigger
    >>> than the sticky strip?

    >> The vibrations. The doesn can't rest until either the remover is switched
    >> off or the dust gets stuck.
    >>
    >> Volker

    >
    > But what will make the dust stick to the sticky strip? Or, perhaps, I
    > should say, why will the dust be attracted to the sticky strip?
    > The vibrations will stop, the dust will be in the air. What will make
    > it go somewhere besides wherever it wants to go?

    I guess it will remove a little bit (the bits that are at the bottom of
    the sensor) each time it gets switched on. Bigger grains will obviously
    drop down more readily. As for small stuff, it's statistics. By making
    one surface vibrate you decerase the surface available for the dust.
    Therefore the percentage of surface covered by the sticky strip increases.
    Therefore the likelyhood of the dust hitting the sticky bit increases
    too.

    Lots of Greetings!
    Volker
    Volker Hetzer, Sep 17, 2006
    #13
  14. measekite

    Bill Funk Guest

    On Sun, 17 Sep 2006 20:57:17 +0200, Volker Hetzer
    <> wrote:

    >Bill Funk wrote:
    >> On Sat, 16 Sep 2006 11:10:49 +0200, Volker Hetzer
    >> <> wrote:
    >>
    >>> Bill Funk wrote:
    >>>
    >>>> Will the dust shaker work? My observations of dust say no, it won't.
    >>>> Dust doesn't fall neatly down, to stick to a vertical sticky strip.
    >>>> What's to keep it from sticking to the sensor, again, which is bigger
    >>>> than the sticky strip?
    >>> The vibrations. The doesn can't rest until either the remover is switched
    >>> off or the dust gets stuck.
    >>>
    >>> Volker

    >>
    >> But what will make the dust stick to the sticky strip? Or, perhaps, I
    >> should say, why will the dust be attracted to the sticky strip?
    >> The vibrations will stop, the dust will be in the air. What will make
    >> it go somewhere besides wherever it wants to go?

    >I guess it will remove a little bit (the bits that are at the bottom of
    >the sensor) each time it gets switched on. Bigger grains will obviously
    >drop down more readily. As for small stuff, it's statistics. By making
    >one surface vibrate you decerase the surface available for the dust.
    >Therefore the percentage of surface covered by the sticky strip increases.
    >Therefore the likelyhood of the dust hitting the sticky bit increases
    >too.


    Eventually.
    But then, new dust enters too.
    And the sticky strip is smaller than the sensor, so the dust is more
    likely to stick on the sensor than on the strip.
    Overall, the dust removal system may mean a little less dust on the
    sensor, but since dust isn't that big a problem in the first place for
    most users...
    I still think it's not needed, and not very usefull.
    >
    >Lots of Greetings!
    >Volker

    --
    Bill Funk
    replace "g" with "a"
    Bill Funk, Sep 18, 2006
    #14
    1. Advertising

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