Nikon D70s & DX lenses?

Discussion in 'Digital Photography' started by Bill Crocker, Jul 17, 2006.

  1. Bill Crocker

    Bill Crocker Guest

    I just purchased a Nikon D70s. I was told by the dealer that I should stick
    with using Nikon's "DX" series lenses because they are designed to be used
    with Nikon's digital cameras. Is this true, and if so why? How do they
    differ? Will non-DX lenses work at all?

    Thanks in advance for your response.

    Bill Crocker
    Bill Crocker, Jul 17, 2006
    #1
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  2. Bill Crocker

    Wayne Guest

    In article <>,
    says...
    >
    >
    >I just purchased a Nikon D70s. I was told by the dealer that I should stick
    >with using Nikon's "DX" series lenses because they are designed to be used
    >with Nikon's digital cameras. Is this true, and if so why? How do they
    >differ? Will non-DX lenses work at all?



    You can use either DX lenses or regular 35mm full frame lenses with the D70S,
    no problem. I have a D70S and I have the 18-70 DX, the 18-200 DX, and the 60mm
    macro (full frame) and the 50 mm f/1.8 (full frame). They all work fine on
    the D70S.

    The DX lenses are not better, actually, technically they could be said to be a
    bit worse, however it doesnt matter to the digital cameras.

    The design of DX lenses doesnt cover (doesnt illuminate) a circle as large as
    full frame 35 mm film. They are designed to only cover the smaller area of
    the digital sensor, about 2/3 size, about APS film size. That is all the
    digital camera needs it to cover, any more would be wasted. The DX lens is
    smaller and lighter and cheaper - except maybe the 18-200. :) But they
    probably couldnt build a full frame 18-200 that good.

    However, the digital would only be using the central portion of the larger
    lens, and the central portion could be consided a better quality image.

    Bottom line, it wont matter which you use on the digital. However 35 mm film
    models CANNOT use the DX lenses, because the DX lens wont cover the full
    frame, and a large area of the corners of full frame would be cut off.

    --
    Wayne
    http://www.scantips.com "A few scanning tips"
    Wayne, Jul 17, 2006
    #2
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  3. "Bill Crocker" <> wrote:
    >I just purchased a Nikon D70s. I was told by the dealer that I should stick
    >with using Nikon's "DX" series lenses because they are designed to be used
    >with Nikon's digital cameras. Is this true, and if so why? How do they
    >differ? Will non-DX lenses work at all?
    >
    >Thanks in advance for your response.
    >
    >Bill Crocker


    In the future there may be a DX series lense designed to replace
    each and every current non-DX lense. They may, and probably
    will in most cases, be at least slightly better lenses too.
    Perhaps with only very slight advantages optically, but for
    example with significant added features like Vibration Reduction
    too.

    I'll enjoy that *very* much, because with dealers making such
    claims there might be mass movement towards buying the new
    lenses... and that would also cause the old ones to show up on
    eBay at prices greatly reduced from what they are today!

    For the budget minded buyer not only are non-DX lenses going to
    continue to be great lenses, but equally so are many of the
    even older non-AF lenses! Auto Focus is a *great* feature... for
    shooting fast moving sports action, children, and other high
    velocity subjects. But for anything that will stand still long
    enough to focus manually, there is an old lense which can be
    purchased today for a dime on the dollar, which makes them worth
    collecting just for fun too.

    One hitch is that the Nikon D50 and D70 cameras do not couple
    the light metering to AI lenses, so only the higher end camera
    models can make use of the older lenses. (Which means that
    _obviously_ you should have bought a D2x, so that you could save
    money on new lenses?? ;-)

    --
    Floyd L. Davidson <http://www.apaflo.com/floyd_davidson>
    Ukpeagvik (Barrow, Alaska)
    Floyd L. Davidson, Jul 17, 2006
    #3
  4. Bill Crocker

    Bill Guest

    Bill Crocker wrote:

    >I just purchased a Nikon D70s. I was told by the dealer that I should stick
    >with using Nikon's "DX" series lenses because they are designed to be used
    >with Nikon's digital cameras. Is this true, and if so why?


    That's completely false.

    You do not need to stick with DX lenses.

    > How do they differ?


    The Nikon DX series is like the Canon EFS group of lenses that have a
    smaller image circle that more closely matches the size of the sensor
    frame. They should only be used on digital bodies.

    Since most digital bodies have a sensor that is smaller than film, the
    lenses for these cameras can be smaller and lighter, and hopefully
    cheaper, yet still perform the same.

    > Will non-DX lenses work at all?


    Yes. Most Nikon lenses will fit on your camera, and pretty much any
    autofocus lense will work just fine.

    There are many sites that explain the various bits of Nikon lenses, and
    this one has a chart:
    http://www.bythom.com/lensacronyms.htm

    This site gives pretty good opinions about performance:
    http://www.naturfotograf.com/lens_zoom_00.html

    Some salesmen will try to tell you that you should only buy "digital"
    lenses for your camera because they have special coatings or designs
    that work better for digital, but that's a load of crap.

    There are no special requirements for digital cameras - any lense that
    fits and functions properly will provide great images for the digital
    sensor to capture.

    And since most 35mm lenses have a "sweet spot" around the center of the
    image, using a regular full-frame lense on a FOV crop factor DSLR means
    you're using the best part of the optics.

    So...use whatever works and have fun.
    Bill, Jul 17, 2006
    #4
  5. Bill Crocker wrote:
    > I just purchased a Nikon D70s. I was told by the dealer that I should stick
    > with using Nikon's "DX" series lenses because they are designed to be used
    > with Nikon's digital cameras. Is this true, and if so why? How do they
    > differ? Will non-DX lenses work at all?
    >
    > Thanks in advance for your response.
    >
    > Bill Crocker
    >
    >


    The other replies have already stated that your salesman is wrong. I'd
    just like to add that you don't even have to stick to the Nikkor brand.
    Brands like Sigma and Tamron make excellent lenses especially fit for
    digital bodies and those are usually way cheaper than what you get from
    Nikon.

    I'm using my D70 with a "legacy" 28-105 Nikkor and an even older Sigma
    70-300. Works great! I have the equivalent of a 450mm. telezoom now! :)
    Bas v.d. Wiel, Jul 17, 2006
    #5
  6. Bill Crocker

    Bill Crocker Guest

    "Floyd L. Davidson" <> wrote in message
    news:...
    [clipped]
    > One hitch is that the Nikon D50 and D70 cameras do not couple
    > the light metering to AI lenses, so only the higher end camera
    > models can make use of the older lenses. (Which means that
    > _obviously_ you should have bought a D2x, so that you could save
    > money on new lenses?? ;-)
    >
    > --
    > Floyd L. Davidson <http://www.apaflo.com/floyd_davidson>
    > Ukpeagvik (Barrow, Alaska)


    Thanks Floyd...I'll try that line on the wife! :)

    Bill Crocker
    Bill Crocker, Jul 17, 2006
    #6
  7. Bill Crocker

    Bill Crocker Guest

    "Bas v.d. Wiel" <> wrote in message
    news:44bba57f$0$31653$4all.nl...
    > Bill Crocker wrote:
    >> I just purchased a Nikon D70s. I was told by the dealer that I should
    >> stick with using Nikon's "DX" series lenses because they are designed to
    >> be used with Nikon's digital cameras. Is this true, and if so why? How
    >> do they differ? Will non-DX lenses work at all?
    >>
    >> Thanks in advance for your response.
    >>
    >> Bill Crocker

    >
    > The other replies have already stated that your salesman is wrong. I'd
    > just like to add that you don't even have to stick to the Nikkor brand.
    > Brands like Sigma and Tamron make excellent lenses especially fit for
    > digital bodies and those are usually way cheaper than what you get from
    > Nikon.
    >
    > I'm using my D70 with a "legacy" 28-105 Nikkor and an even older Sigma
    > 70-300. Works great! I have the equivalent of a 450mm. telezoom now! :)


    When I had a Canon 10D, all the Cannon experts(?) were really ripping on
    Sigma claiming they were junk and in many cases wouldn't even work with
    Canon's cameras. There were constant flame wars regarding Canon/Sigma. Is
    there any justification in their claims, or is it a case of
    more-money-than-brains?

    Thanks,
    Bill Crocker
    Bill Crocker, Jul 17, 2006
    #7
  8. Bill Crocker

    Bill Funk Guest

    On Mon, 17 Jul 2006 12:22:18 -0400, "Bill Crocker"
    <> wrote:

    >
    >"Bas v.d. Wiel" <> wrote in message
    >news:44bba57f$0$31653$4all.nl...
    >> Bill Crocker wrote:
    >>> I just purchased a Nikon D70s. I was told by the dealer that I should
    >>> stick with using Nikon's "DX" series lenses because they are designed to
    >>> be used with Nikon's digital cameras. Is this true, and if so why? How
    >>> do they differ? Will non-DX lenses work at all?
    >>>
    >>> Thanks in advance for your response.
    >>>
    >>> Bill Crocker

    >>
    >> The other replies have already stated that your salesman is wrong. I'd
    >> just like to add that you don't even have to stick to the Nikkor brand.
    >> Brands like Sigma and Tamron make excellent lenses especially fit for
    >> digital bodies and those are usually way cheaper than what you get from
    >> Nikon.
    >>
    >> I'm using my D70 with a "legacy" 28-105 Nikkor and an even older Sigma
    >> 70-300. Works great! I have the equivalent of a 450mm. telezoom now! :)

    >
    >When I had a Canon 10D, all the Cannon experts(?) were really ripping on
    >Sigma claiming they were junk and in many cases wouldn't even work with
    >Canon's cameras. There were constant flame wars regarding Canon/Sigma. Is
    >there any justification in their claims, or is it a case of
    >more-money-than-brains?
    >
    >Thanks,
    >Bill Crocker
    >


    I have friends with Canons and Sigma lenses.
    It appears that Sigma can rechip many of their lenses to work with
    newer Canons, and will do so once for a given lens for free.
    However, some (many?) older Sigma lenses can't be re-chipped at all,
    and it's up to the user to determine which lenses these are; Sigma
    won't help here, evidently.
    So, the wisdom seems to be: only buy Sigma lenses new (and newer
    series lenses at that), unless you *know* it will work on your Canon.
    From what my friends say (and show), many Sigma lenses are pretty
    good.
    --
    Bill Funk
    replace "g" with "a"
    Bill Funk, Jul 17, 2006
    #8
  9. Floyd L. Davidson <> wrote:
    >
    > One hitch is that the Nikon D50 and D70 cameras do not couple
    > the light metering to AI lenses, so only the higher end camera
    > models can make use of the older lenses. (Which means that
    > _obviously_ you should have bought a D2x, so that you could save
    > money on new lenses?? ;-)
    >


    Or get a used F100 and use the savings to buy more film ;-)

    --
    Thomas T. Veldhouse
    Key Fingerprint: 2DB9 813F F510 82C2 E1AE 34D0 D69D 1EDC D5EC AED1
    Thomas T. Veldhouse, Jul 17, 2006
    #9
  10. "Thomas T. Veldhouse" <> wrote:
    >Floyd L. Davidson <> wrote:
    >>
    >> One hitch is that the Nikon D50 and D70 cameras do not couple
    >> the light metering to AI lenses, so only the higher end camera
    >> models can make use of the older lenses. (Which means that
    >> _obviously_ you should have bought a D2x, so that you could save
    >> money on new lenses?? ;-)
    >>

    >
    >Or get a used F100 and use the savings to buy more film ;-)


    I don't know what the cost of film processing is where you live,
    or how many frames you shoot in a year... but for me the cost
    saving in in storing images to DVDs rather than negatives in just
    *one* year is enough to pay for a D2x.

    Ymmv, of course.

    --
    Floyd L. Davidson <http://www.apaflo.com/floyd_davidson>
    Ukpeagvik (Barrow, Alaska)
    Floyd L. Davidson, Jul 17, 2006
    #10
  11. "Floyd L. Davidson" <> wrote:
    > "Thomas T. Veldhouse" <> wrote:
    >>Floyd L. Davidson <> wrote:
    >>>
    >>> One hitch is that the Nikon D50 and D70 cameras do not couple
    >>> the light metering to AI lenses, so only the higher end camera
    >>> models can make use of the older lenses. (Which means that
    >>> _obviously_ you should have bought a D2x, so that you could save
    >>> money on new lenses?? ;-)
    >>>

    >>
    >>Or get a used F100 and use the savings to buy more film ;-)

    >
    > I don't know what the cost of film processing is where you live,
    > or how many frames you shoot in a year... but for me the cost
    > saving in in storing images to DVDs rather than negatives in just
    > *one* year is enough to pay for a D2x.


    Film is great, as long as you don't take any pictures...

    David J. Littleboy
    Tokyo, Japan
    David J. Littleboy, Jul 17, 2006
    #11
  12. "David J. Littleboy" <> wrote:
    >"Floyd L. Davidson" <> wrote:
    >> "Thomas T. Veldhouse" <> wrote:
    >>>Floyd L. Davidson <> wrote:
    >>>>
    >>>> One hitch is that the Nikon D50 and D70 cameras do not couple
    >>>> the light metering to AI lenses, so only the higher end camera
    >>>> models can make use of the older lenses. (Which means that
    >>>> _obviously_ you should have bought a D2x, so that you could save
    >>>> money on new lenses?? ;-)
    >>>
    >>>Or get a used F100 and use the savings to buy more film ;-)

    >>
    >> I don't know what the cost of film processing is where you live,
    >> or how many frames you shoot in a year... but for me the cost
    >> saving in in storing images to DVDs rather than negatives in just
    >> *one* year is enough to pay for a D2x.

    >
    >Film is great, as long as you don't take any pictures...


    Digital is cheap... if you would have taken that many pictures
    with film.

    --
    Floyd L. Davidson <http://www.apaflo.com/floyd_davidson>
    Ukpeagvik (Barrow, Alaska)
    Floyd L. Davidson, Jul 17, 2006
    #12
  13. Bill Crocker wrote:
    > "Bas v.d. Wiel" <> wrote in message
    > news:44bba57f$0$31653$4all.nl...
    >> Bill Crocker wrote:
    >>> I just purchased a Nikon D70s. I was told by the dealer that I should
    >>> stick with using Nikon's "DX" series lenses because they are designed to
    >>> be used with Nikon's digital cameras. Is this true, and if so why? How
    >>> do they differ? Will non-DX lenses work at all?
    >>>
    >>> Thanks in advance for your response.
    >>>
    >>> Bill Crocker

    >> The other replies have already stated that your salesman is wrong. I'd
    >> just like to add that you don't even have to stick to the Nikkor brand.
    >> Brands like Sigma and Tamron make excellent lenses especially fit for
    >> digital bodies and those are usually way cheaper than what you get from
    >> Nikon.
    >>
    >> I'm using my D70 with a "legacy" 28-105 Nikkor and an even older Sigma
    >> 70-300. Works great! I have the equivalent of a 450mm. telezoom now! :)

    >
    > When I had a Canon 10D, all the Cannon experts(?) were really ripping on
    > Sigma claiming they were junk and in many cases wouldn't even work with
    > Canon's cameras. There were constant flame wars regarding Canon/Sigma. Is
    > there any justification in their claims, or is it a case of
    > more-money-than-brains?
    >
    > Thanks,
    > Bill Crocker
    >
    >


    The 70-300 I got is one of the cheapest 70-300 lenses in this price
    range but the pictures I take with it are perfectly OK. I can't comment
    on compatibility with Canon but this one lens, which I got used in
    around 2001, has worked perfectly with my Nikons (F90X and D70). The
    only small annoyance I have with this lens is that the zoom ring twists
    the other way around from my Nikkor lenses.

    Bas
    Bas v.d. Wiel, Jul 18, 2006
    #13
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