Nikon D7000 vs. Canon Eos 60D

Discussion in 'Digital Photography' started by Alan Lichtenstein, Jul 11, 2011.

  1. I currently own an Olympus E-Volt 500, which has served me well when my
    skills were more limited than they are now. Wanting to move up to a
    prosumer level camera, naturally I would like to stick with Olympus
    because I already own the lenses and their 4/3 system is not compatible
    with third party lens manufacturers. The Olympus E-30, or whatever
    iteration in the next generation would be the one.

    The only problem is that Olympus is apparently going out of the DSLR
    cameras, hinging their star to the EVF-IL types. They have produced
    only one new DSLR camera in two years, and that one is to replace their
    professional E-3 with the E-5. Since it is evident that Olympus is not
    going to support their DSLR lines with new models, it is apparently time
    to switch. I'm currently looking at the cameras in the topic line and
    would like to know pros and cons. I've handled both of them and both
    are far heavier than my Olympus and a bit more cumbersome to use. But
    they are what they are, and it's evident I'll have to get used to one of
    them. So, any reasons why I should purchase one over the other? I
    realize the initial investment, which includes replacing all my lenses
    is going to be rather steep.
    Alan Lichtenstein, Jul 11, 2011
    #1
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  2. Alan Lichtenstein

    MC Guest

    Alan Lichtenstein wrote:

    > I currently own an Olympus E-Volt 500, which has served me well when
    > my skills were more limited than they are now. Wanting to move up to
    > a prosumer level camera, naturally I would like to stick with Olympus
    > because I already own the lenses and their 4/3 system is not
    > compatible with third party lens manufacturers. The Olympus E-30, or
    > whatever iteration in the next generation would be the one.
    >
    > The only problem is that Olympus is apparently going out of the DSLR
    > cameras, hinging their star to the EVF-IL types. They have produced
    > only one new DSLR camera in two years, and that one is to replace
    > their professional E-3 with the E-5. Since it is evident that
    > Olympus is not going to support their DSLR lines with new models, it
    > is apparently time to switch. I'm currently looking at the cameras
    > in the topic line and would like to know pros and cons. I've handled
    > both of them and both are far heavier than my Olympus and a bit more
    > cumbersome to use. But they are what they are, and it's evident I'll
    > have to get used to one of them. So, any reasons why I should
    > purchase one over the other? I realize the initial investment, which
    > includes replacing all my lenses is going to be rather steep.


    As a Canon user of many years I feel Canon have let themselves down a
    little with the prosumer xxD series since the 40D. The 40D was and
    still is a far superior build quality than the 50/60D and I would still
    rather own a 40D than a 50/60D. In fact, even though I own two 5D
    Mk2s, I still have a 40D and would never swap it for a 60D. I have
    always believed that you get more bang for your buck with Canon cameras
    than the equivalent Nikon models but on this occasion, if my only
    choice was between a Canon 60D and a Nikon D7000, I would rather own a
    D7000. However, this would only be if I did not already have a suite
    of lenses for Canon, of course.

    MC
    MC, Jul 11, 2011
    #2
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  3. Alan Lichtenstein

    Robert Coe Guest

    On Sun, 10 Jul 2011 19:17:07 -0400, Alan Lichtenstein <> wrote:
    : I currently own an Olympus E-Volt 500, which has served me well when my
    : skills were more limited than they are now. Wanting to move up to a
    : prosumer level camera, naturally I would like to stick with Olympus
    : because I already own the lenses and their 4/3 system is not compatible
    : with third party lens manufacturers. The Olympus E-30, or whatever
    : iteration in the next generation would be the one.
    :
    : The only problem is that Olympus is apparently going out of the DSLR
    : cameras, hinging their star to the EVF-IL types. They have produced
    : only one new DSLR camera in two years, and that one is to replace their
    : professional E-3 with the E-5. Since it is evident that Olympus is not
    : going to support their DSLR lines with new models, it is apparently time
    : to switch. I'm currently looking at the cameras in the topic line and
    : would like to know pros and cons. I've handled both of them and both
    : are far heavier than my Olympus and a bit more cumbersome to use. But
    : they are what they are, and it's evident I'll have to get used to one of
    : them. So, any reasons why I should purchase one over the other? I
    : realize the initial investment, which includes replacing all my lenses
    : is going to be rather steep.

    Don't buy a 60D. It doesn't have user-settable autofocus micro-adjustment. And
    if my experience with Canon equipment is any guide, you probably WILL need
    that feature.

    For about the same money, buy a 50D (if you can find one).

    Bob
    Robert Coe, Jul 11, 2011
    #3
  4. Handling may be quite important to you - the feel and weight of the
    cameras, how easy or otherwise you find the menus. Perhaps even how well
    you can operate the camera whilst wearing gloves. I compared bodies when
    I first bought, and preferred the Nikon to the Canon, and now I'm sticking
    with range that as I have a few lenses.

    If I were in your situation, I would consider going to the smaller and
    lighter EVF-based micro 4/3 cameras, where you could use your existing
    lenses. I would certainly consider the lighter end of the Nikon range -
    perhaps the D5100. You don't want to be leaving the camera at home
    because it's too heavy or bulky!

    Cheers,
    David
    David J Taylor, Jul 11, 2011
    #4
  5. Alan Lichtenstein

    Bruce Guest

    Alan Lichtenstein <> wrote:
    >I currently own an Olympus E-Volt 500, which has served me well when my
    >skills were more limited than they are now. Wanting to move up to a
    >prosumer level camera, naturally I would like to stick with Olympus
    >because I already own the lenses and their 4/3 system is not compatible
    >with third party lens manufacturers. The Olympus E-30, or whatever
    >iteration in the next generation would be the one.
    >
    >The only problem is that Olympus is apparently going out of the DSLR
    >cameras, hinging their star to the EVF-IL types. They have produced
    >only one new DSLR camera in two years, and that one is to replace their
    >professional E-3 with the E-5. Since it is evident that Olympus is not
    >going to support their DSLR lines with new models, it is apparently time
    >to switch. I'm currently looking at the cameras in the topic line and
    >would like to know pros and cons. I've handled both of them and both
    >are far heavier than my Olympus and a bit more cumbersome to use. But
    >they are what they are, and it's evident I'll have to get used to one of
    >them. So, any reasons why I should purchase one over the other? I
    >realize the initial investment, which includes replacing all my lenses
    >is going to be rather steep.



    Recent news from Olympus suggests that, as a result of the outcry that
    greeted the company's suggestion that no more E-System DSLRs would be
    developed, Olympus has changed its mind. The company is now expected
    to continue with the development of future E-X and E-XX models.
    However there will be no more E-XXX models, because Olympus believes
    that the market for these has largely been satisfied with the
    introduction of PEN mirrorless cameras.

    So if you have a substantial investment in the excellent Zuiko Digital
    lenses there will be an upgrade path with the Olympus brand.

    This is Olympus' official policy. If I can find a link to a press
    release I will post it.
    Bruce, Jul 11, 2011
    #5
  6. David J Taylor wrote:
    > Handling may be quite important to you - the feel and weight of the
    > cameras, how easy or otherwise you find the menus. Perhaps even how
    > well you can operate the camera whilst wearing gloves. I compared
    > bodies when I first bought, and preferred the Nikon to the Canon, and
    > now I'm sticking with range that as I have a few lenses.
    >
    > If I were in your situation, I would consider going to the smaller and
    > lighter EVF-based micro 4/3 cameras, where you could use your existing
    > lenses. I would certainly consider the lighter end of the Nikon range -
    > perhaps the D5100. You don't want to be leaving the camera at home
    > because it's too heavy or bulky!
    >
    > Cheers,
    > David


    David:

    Thank you for your advice, however, I will never use one of those EVF
    cameras. I want a DSLR with a mirror box. Olympus is hitching their
    star to them, as they likely believe that they're the best invention
    since canned beer. I had the opportunity to try one on a recent trip to
    the Amazon. The man in the zodiac next to me had an Olympus PEN EP-1.
    He let me handle it, and I was truly amazed at the weight of the camera.
    It weighed less than my wife's compact, and in fact, came close to the
    weight of some of the smaller point-and-shoot cameras. It had state of
    the art features, including full HD. I put my 70-300 lens on it, just
    for kicks, and the lens was 50% heavier than the camera.

    However, when I attempted to use the viewfinder, good luck. Couldn't
    see a thing. That, simply put, substantiated my conjectures regarding
    those EVF-IL cameras. They're no better, IMHO, than the cheap
    point-and-shoot cameras with those views. They're not DSLR's and never
    will be, no matter how technically sophisticated they make them.

    I posted this because I recognize that I will likely have to switch
    manufacturers and after handling both cameras, wasn't too impressed with
    the ease of changing functions with either. But, they are what they
    are, and if I want to move up in a DSLR, those are the two I'm
    considering right now. I just wanted some opinions on the quality of
    one as compared to the other, as I really haven't had the opportunity to
    use them under actual circumstances, beyond the camera store.
    Alan Lichtenstein, Jul 13, 2011
    #6
  7. Bruce wrote:

    > Alan Lichtenstein <> wrote:
    >
    >>I currently own an Olympus E-Volt 500, which has served me well when my
    >>skills were more limited than they are now. Wanting to move up to a
    >>prosumer level camera, naturally I would like to stick with Olympus
    >>because I already own the lenses and their 4/3 system is not compatible
    >>with third party lens manufacturers. The Olympus E-30, or whatever
    >>iteration in the next generation would be the one.
    >>
    >>The only problem is that Olympus is apparently going out of the DSLR
    >>cameras, hinging their star to the EVF-IL types. They have produced
    >>only one new DSLR camera in two years, and that one is to replace their
    >>professional E-3 with the E-5. Since it is evident that Olympus is not
    >>going to support their DSLR lines with new models, it is apparently time
    >>to switch. I'm currently looking at the cameras in the topic line and
    >>would like to know pros and cons. I've handled both of them and both
    >>are far heavier than my Olympus and a bit more cumbersome to use. But
    >>they are what they are, and it's evident I'll have to get used to one of
    >>them. So, any reasons why I should purchase one over the other? I
    >>realize the initial investment, which includes replacing all my lenses
    >>is going to be rather steep.

    >
    >
    >
    > Recent news from Olympus suggests that, as a result of the outcry that
    > greeted the company's suggestion that no more E-System DSLRs would be
    > developed, Olympus has changed its mind. The company is now expected
    > to continue with the development of future E-X and E-XX models.
    > However there will be no more E-XXX models, because Olympus believes
    > that the market for these has largely been satisfied with the
    > introduction of PEN mirrorless cameras.
    >
    > So if you have a substantial investment in the excellent Zuiko Digital
    > lenses there will be an upgrade path with the Olympus brand.
    >
    > This is Olympus' official policy. If I can find a link to a press
    > release I will post it.
    >


    That's good to know. All the people I spoke to, including sales
    representatives were very non-committal and close-mouthed regarding this
    issue. In fact, one source in Olympus that I had an exchange of e-mails
    with seemed to indicate that they were banking on the PEN cameras as
    opposed to the DSLR type. None, however, would say what the official
    policy was with respect to the DSLR line. I've seen nothing published
    to support what you say, so if you have a link to some official source,
    I'd appreciate it. I get the Olympus newsletters periodically, and I've
    seen nothing from them regarding this issue there. I'll look again;
    maybe it was buried somewhere that I missed. As I said, I'd rather
    stick with Olympus, and since I've already waited two years, I'll wait
    another one if they're going to come out with the next iteration to the
    E-30.
    Alan Lichtenstein, Jul 13, 2011
    #7
  8. Alan Lichtenstein

    Bruce Guest

    Alan Lichtenstein <> wrote:
    >Bruce wrote:
    >>
    >> Recent news from Olympus suggests that, as a result of the outcry that
    >> greeted the company's suggestion that no more E-System DSLRs would be
    >> developed, Olympus has changed its mind. The company is now expected
    >> to continue with the development of future E-X and E-XX models.
    >> However there will be no more E-XXX models, because Olympus believes
    >> that the market for these has largely been satisfied with the
    >> introduction of PEN mirrorless cameras.
    >>
    >> So if you have a substantial investment in the excellent Zuiko Digital
    >> lenses there will be an upgrade path with the Olympus brand.
    >>
    >> This is Olympus' official policy. If I can find a link to a press
    >> release I will post it.
    >>

    >
    >That's good to know. All the people I spoke to, including sales
    >representatives were very non-committal and close-mouthed regarding this
    >issue.



    Everything has changed within the last few weeks. Two months ago,
    Olympus suggested that there would be no new DSLRs. But the outcry
    from Olympus owners, enthusiasts and the dealer network forced the
    company to reconsider.

    A recent notice to Olympus dealers in Europe that states the E-X and
    E-XX models will continue but there will be no more E-XXX models. The
    E-620 will be the last E-XXX model and that has not been manufactured
    for some months now. Unfortunately I am not allowed to republish that
    notice.


    >In fact, one source in Olympus that I had an exchange of e-mails
    >with seemed to indicate that they were banking on the PEN cameras as
    >opposed to the DSLR type.



    That was the situation a few weeks ago. It has changed.


    >None, however, would say what the official
    >policy was with respect to the DSLR line.



    I don't think there was one.

    My guess is that the company's statement about DSLRs being
    discontinued was intended only to elicit a response from Olympus
    stakeholders around the world. The outcry convinced Olympus that it
    would be worth carrying on with E-X and E-XX product lines but not the
    E-XXX whose market had almost vanished with the introduction of the
    PEN Micro Four Thirds system.


    >I've seen nothing published
    >to support what you say, so if you have a link to some official source,
    >I'd appreciate it.



    I have seen this information published online but cannot recall where.
    I cannot publish anything from Olympus but I suggest you search for it
    online. Sites such as photorumors.com and photographybay.com are a
    good place to look, plus there is of course 43rumors.com.


    >I get the Olympus newsletters periodically, and I've
    >seen nothing from them regarding this issue there.



    Newsletters tend to avoid such issues! ;-)


    >I'll look again;
    >maybe it was buried somewhere that I missed. As I said, I'd rather
    >stick with Olympus, and since I've already waited two years, I'll wait
    >another one if they're going to come out with the next iteration to the
    >E-30.



    You may have a long wait, because Olympus has so far been unable to
    source a sensor with more than 12 MP.
    Bruce, Jul 13, 2011
    #8
  9. Bruce wrote:

    > Alan Lichtenstein <> wrote:
    >
    >>Bruce wrote:
    >>
    >>>Recent news from Olympus suggests that, as a result of the outcry that
    >>>greeted the company's suggestion that no more E-System DSLRs would be
    >>>developed, Olympus has changed its mind. The company is now expected
    >>>to continue with the development of future E-X and E-XX models.
    >>>However there will be no more E-XXX models, because Olympus believes
    >>>that the market for these has largely been satisfied with the
    >>>introduction of PEN mirrorless cameras.
    >>>
    >>>So if you have a substantial investment in the excellent Zuiko Digital
    >>>lenses there will be an upgrade path with the Olympus brand.
    >>>
    >>>This is Olympus' official policy. If I can find a link to a press
    >>>release I will post it.
    >>>

    >>
    >>That's good to know. All the people I spoke to, including sales
    >>representatives were very non-committal and close-mouthed regarding this
    >>issue.

    >
    >
    >
    > Everything has changed within the last few weeks. Two months ago,
    > Olympus suggested that there would be no new DSLRs. But the outcry
    > from Olympus owners, enthusiasts and the dealer network forced the
    > company to reconsider.
    >
    > A recent notice to Olympus dealers in Europe that states the E-X and
    > E-XX models will continue but there will be no more E-XXX models. The
    > E-620 will be the last E-XXX model and that has not been manufactured
    > for some months now. Unfortunately I am not allowed to republish that
    > notice.


    We know the E-X series will continue, because Olympus has already
    released the E-5. However, as I indicated previously, I can't get a
    straight answer out of anyone in Olympus, and even personnel in camera
    stores don't have a clue.

    I accept that you can't republish the notice as to Olympus' future
    marketing plans, however, given what you said about the outcry( myself
    included ) from Olympus owners, it makes no sense to NOT tell these
    owners, like myself, that Olympus is NOT abandoning them. Absent such
    notice, I'm purchasing another system.

    As to you assertion that Olympus is not going to compete in the entry
    level DSLR business with the E-XXX line, the 620 was one good camera,
    and if updated, could have been a hefty competitor to the Nikon and
    Canon entries. I considered purchasing a 620, but backed off, figuring
    that I'd step up to the E-30's next iteration.

    >>In fact, one source in Olympus that I had an exchange of e-mails
    >>with seemed to indicate that they were banking on the PEN cameras as
    >>opposed to the DSLR type.

    >
    >
    >
    > That was the situation a few weeks ago. It has changed.


    If such is the case, then they should let the world know. It makes no
    sense to keep this a secret. My opinion.

    >>None, however, would say what the official
    >>policy was with respect to the DSLR line.

    >
    >
    >
    > I don't think there was one.


    There had to be. Someone made a decision to cease development on DSLR's
    and concentrate on the PEN EVF line.

    > My guess is that the company's statement about DSLRs being
    > discontinued was intended only to elicit a response from Olympus
    > stakeholders around the world. The outcry convinced Olympus that it
    > would be worth carrying on with E-X and E-XX product lines but not the
    > E-XXX whose market had almost vanished with the introduction of the
    > PEN Micro Four Thirds system.


    You may in fact be correct in your conjecture. And the conclusions
    about discontinuing the E-XXX line make sense if your conjecture is
    correct. The E-XXX line was an entry level line. Any current owner of
    an Olympus is NOT going to purchase another entry level camera, but will
    likely step up. Hence, the outcry from Olympus owners would surely be
    concentrated in demand of the prosumer and pro lines. So your
    conjecture makes sense.

    But I've noticed that Olympus doesn't seem to be too swift in making
    marketing decisions. Basing their decision on the outcry of current
    Olympus owners and discontinuing the the entry level line, is akin to
    Nikon receiving feedback from Nikon owners, looking to step up and
    deciding to eliminate the 3100, since nobody lobbied for that. IMHO, I
    believe that Olympus made another serious error, if wht you say is true,
    by eliminating the entry level line. You increase market share by
    getting new customers, which your entry level cameras are designed to
    do. You don't increase market share by simply satisfying your current
    customers. But that's Olympus' problem. I think they're finding out
    that the point-and-shoot crowd are NOT going to spend the bucks for the
    PEN cameras( witness their latest iteration in that line ) at a
    significant reduced price. Even the people who shoot with a compact are
    not going to step up to that.

    >>I've seen nothing published
    >>to support what you say, so if you have a link to some official source,
    >>I'd appreciate it.

    >
    >
    >
    > I have seen this information published online but cannot recall where.
    > I cannot publish anything from Olympus but I suggest you search for it
    > online. Sites such as photorumors.com and photographybay.com are a
    > good place to look, plus there is of course 43rumors.com.


    Thanks. I'll take a look.

    >>I get the Olympus newsletters periodically, and I've
    >>seen nothing from them regarding this issue there.

    >
    >
    >
    > Newsletters tend to avoid such issues! ;-)
    >
    >
    >
    >>I'll look again;
    >>maybe it was buried somewhere that I missed. As I said, I'd rather
    >>stick with Olympus, and since I've already waited two years, I'll wait
    >>another one if they're going to come out with the next iteration to the
    >>E-30.

    >
    >
    >
    > You may have a long wait, because Olympus has so far been unable to
    > source a sensor with more than 12 MP.


    Well, you have a point there. I didn't consider resolution. But for my
    purposes 12 megapixels is adequate. But I do suppose that Olympus will
    want to upgrade that if they are going to compete in that market.
    Alan Lichtenstein, Jul 13, 2011
    #9
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