Nikon D70 / Tahiti / filters / Picture sizes?

Discussion in 'Digital Photography' started by Paul, May 10, 2004.

  1. Paul

    Paul Guest

    I just purchased a Nikon D70 Outfit ( D70 with Nikon AF-S DX 18-70mm
    lens), and as I'm flying to Tahithi &Bora Bora next Thursday I'm
    wondering if I should also buy ND or UV filters?

    What about a polarized filter?

    This is a 67mm lens, and I couldn't find it at any of the stores
    nearby, so I may need to put an urgent order online, but
    I have to be sure which one is recommended to shoot under
    such light and weather conditions (bright sun, sometimes clouds,
    white sandy beaches, etc.)

    I have already purchased a good carrying case for just the camera
    (I have not found the original Nikon case for the D70) and a Lexar
    1GB CF 40X flash card (any recommendations here?)

    Any other aspect to consider before taking this camera to
    the hot and humid South Pacific islands?

    And a last question:

    Considering I have 1GB, and a second 250MB memory
    cards: What is the best picture format to choose, normal
    or fine?
    Is there a noticeable difference between both formats, if I was later
    to enlarge any or some of the pictures to make a poster?

    I'll appreciate any help regarding this mater.

    Thanks in advance,
    Paul.

    BTW: Is there any other specific Nikon newsgroup or forum
    that I should consider from now on?
    Paul, May 10, 2004
    #1
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  2. Paul

    Bob Salomon Guest

    In article <>,
    Paul <> wrote:

    > I just purchased a Nikon D70 Outfit ( D70 with Nikon AF-S DX 18-70mm
    > lens), and as I'm flying to Tahithi &Bora Bora next Thursday I'm
    > wondering if I should also buy ND or UV filters?
    >
    > What about a polarized filter?
    >
    > This is a 67mm lens, and I couldn't find it at any of the stores
    > nearby, so I may need to put an urgent order online, but
    > I have to be sure which one is recommended to shoot under
    > such light and weather conditions (bright sun, sometimes clouds,
    > white sandy beaches, etc.)
    >
    > I have already purchased a good carrying case for just the camera
    > (I have not found the original Nikon case for the D70) and a Lexar
    > 1GB CF 40X flash card (any recommendations here?)
    >
    > Any other aspect to consider before taking this camera to
    > the hot and humid South Pacific islands?
    >
    > And a last question:
    >
    > Considering I have 1GB, and a second 250MB memory
    > cards: What is the best picture format to choose, normal
    > or fine?
    > Is there a noticeable difference between both formats, if I was later
    > to enlarge any or some of the pictures to make a poster?
    >
    > I'll appreciate any help regarding this mater.
    >
    > Thanks in advance,
    > Paul.
    >
    > BTW: Is there any other specific Nikon newsgroup or forum
    > that I should consider from now on?


    Yes you want a polarizer and a UV. You do not use them at the same time.

    67mm is an extremely common size. Any camera store will have them in
    stock.

    --
    To reply no_ HPMarketing Corp.
    Bob Salomon, May 10, 2004
    #2
    1. Advertising

  3. Paul

    adm Guest

    "Paul" <> wrote in message
    news:...
    >
    > Considering I have 1GB, and a second 250MB memory
    > cards: What is the best picture format to choose, normal
    > or fine?
    > Is there a noticeable difference between both formats, if I was later
    > to enlarge any or some of the pictures to make a poster?


    Choose the RAW format. It will allow you to easily alter exposure and white
    balance later. The only drawback is the file size, however, with 1.25G of
    flash, you should get 250 pictures - and allowing for deleting bad shots
    right on the camera, that can go a long way. However - I would expect that
    Tahiti is beautiful and you'll take a lot of pictures.

    Of course, if you also have a laptop with you, you can just dump the shots
    to hard disk as you go and have no more storage worries.


    >
    > I'll appreciate any help regarding this mater.
    >
    > Thanks in advance,
    > Paul.
    >
    > BTW: Is there any other specific Nikon newsgroup or forum
    > that I should consider from now on?
    >
    adm, May 10, 2004
    #3
  4. Paul

    gmr2048 Guest

    Why should he not use them at the same time? Vignetting <sp?>, or do
    they have some adverse affect on each other?

    -gary


    On Mon, 10 May 2004 13:54:11 -0400, Bob Salomon
    <> wrote:

    >Yes you want a polarizer and a UV. You do not use them at the same time.
    gmr2048, May 11, 2004
    #4
  5. In article <>,
    gmr2048 <> wrote:

    > Why should he not use them at the same time? Vignetting <sp?>, or do
    > they have some adverse affect on each other?
    >
    > -gary
    >
    >
    > On Mon, 10 May 2004 13:54:11 -0400, Bob Salomon
    > <> wrote:
    >
    > >Yes you want a polarizer and a UV. You do not use them at the same time.

    >


    I would guess because the lens vignettes at its widest setting using the provided
    lens shade, using two filters also does the same.
    Any Moose Poster, May 12, 2004
    #5
  6. Paul

    George Guest


    >
    > On Mon, 10 May 2004 13:54:11 -0400, Bob Salomon
    > <> wrote:
    >
    > >Yes you want a polarizer and a UV. You do not use them at the same time.

    >


    Been to Tahiti a couple times and the second time I took a Tiffen Enhancing
    filter...turned out to be quite handy and made the sunsets look much more
    like they did in person.
    George, May 12, 2004
    #6
  7. Paul

    Paul Guest

    Many thanks to Bob Salomon, gmr2048, Any Moose
    Poster, George, and adm.

    I just purchase a Lexar 2GB 40X Flash Card, and 2 Hoya filters,
    a Cir-Polarizing and a UV (both sides coated). I'm also taking with
    me, my "old" Quantaray 70-300mm lens that I purchased a few
    years ago. I'm planning to use it just in the Manual position,
    to shoot some nice sunsets.

    As adm recommend, I'm going to shoot most of the time in the RAW
    format, as the Nikon shows 190 RAW pictures on its display with the
    2GB card inserted. I'm going to shoot all non scenery pictures
    such as inside restaurants, (or when drinking to many Mai Tais ; )
    etc. in the JPEG fine format.

    I'm flying tomorrow morning to Papeete, and I have 2 more questions
    left:

    1) I have tried the D70 around home, mostly in the Auto position
    setting, as I'm a novice with this sophisticated machine.
    Pictures look great, but when viewing them through the Nikon's
    built-in LCD (as for example, immediately after shooting them),
    some show a flashing area, and I learn this is an indication of
    saturation. This happens even when shooting in the Auto position
    and with the UV filter on. Should I worry about this? (ISO is set to
    200)

    I assume this is not going to happen when using the polarized filter,
    but I'd like to be safe and sure.

    2) Do I use the polarized filter when shooting a close subject, as for
    example close up of people on the beach, etc?

    Until I learn more, do I shoot everything in the Auto position, or
    better try the Digital Vari-Programs?

    Once again, many thanks to you all, and
    I'll gladly share my pictures when I come back.

    Regards,
    paul






    On Mon, 10 May 2004 20:57:05 +0100, "adm" <> wrote:

    >
    >"Paul" <> wrote in message
    >news:...
    >>
    >> Considering I have 1GB, and a second 250MB memory
    >> cards: What is the best picture format to choose, normal
    >> or fine?
    >> Is there a noticeable difference between both formats, if I was later
    >> to enlarge any or some of the pictures to make a poster?

    >
    >Choose the RAW format. It will allow you to easily alter exposure and white
    >balance later. The only drawback is the file size, however, with 1.25G of
    >flash, you should get 250 pictures - and allowing for deleting bad shots
    >right on the camera, that can go a long way. However - I would expect that
    >Tahiti is beautiful and you'll take a lot of pictures.
    >
    >Of course, if you also have a laptop with you, you can just dump the shots
    >to hard disk as you go and have no more storage worries.
    >
    >
    >>
    >> I'll appreciate any help regarding this mater.
    >>
    >> Thanks in advance,
    >> Paul.
    >>
    >> BTW: Is there any other specific Nikon newsgroup or forum
    >> that I should consider from now on?
    >>

    >
    Paul, May 12, 2004
    #7
  8. Paul

    Duncan Guest

    On Wed, 12 May 2004 14:59:46 -0700, Paul <>
    wrote:

    >some show a flashing area, and I learn this is an indication of
    >saturation. This happens even when shooting in the Auto position
    >and with the UV filter on. Should I worry about this? (ISO is set to
    >200)


    I don't know about the flashing because I don't have one of those
    cameras. But on any variably lit scene you are likely to have some
    highlights that are saturated. The meter just tries it's best and
    averages to get a decent exposure.

    The UV filter will only affect the haze in distant scenes through lots
    of atmosphere, and protect your lens. It won't affect exposure or
    highlights.

    >
    >I assume this is not going to happen when using the polarized filter,
    >but I'd like to be safe and sure.
    >
    >2) Do I use the polarized filter when shooting a close subject, as for
    >example close up of people on the beach, etc?


    The polarizer is best used in bright sunlight. When taking a picture
    with blue sky looking 90 degrees away from the sun it will darken the
    sky. It eliminates reflections on leaves and other vegetation. It
    also diminishes the reflection from the surface of the water (and
    glass). You will be able to see the coral underneath the surface of
    the water, if Tahiti has coral. All of these things are a great help
    for pictures in the tropics.

    In fact, I highly recommend getting a pair of polarized sunglasses. In
    the tropics they make the world vibrant with color.

    In a sunlit scene the polarizer can remove up to 50% of the light, so
    your exposure can change. This will not affect those highlights, as
    your meter will compensate, except for bright reflections off the
    water, which will be reduced considerably.

    HTH
    Duncan
    Duncan, May 13, 2004
    #8
  9. On Wed, 12 May 2004 00:07:42 GMT, Any Moose Poster
    <Bullwinks@bullwinkle&rockie.net> wrote:

    >In article <>,
    > gmr2048 <> wrote:
    >
    >> Why should he not use them at the same time? Vignetting <sp?>, or do
    >> they have some adverse affect on each other?
    >>
    >> -gary
    >>
    >>
    >> On Mon, 10 May 2004 13:54:11 -0400, Bob Salomon
    >> <> wrote:
    >>
    >> >Yes you want a polarizer and a UV. You do not use them at the same time.

    >>

    >
    >I would guess because the lens vignettes at its widest setting using the provided
    >lens shade, using two filters also does the same.


    I surprised that lense does and the 12 to 24 doesn't.
    I have the 12 to 24 and there is no vignetting from the sunshade at
    the 12 mm setting.

    I would not expect to see both the polarizer and UV filter vinette
    either on the 18 either, but only trying them will prove if they do or
    don't.

    Roger Halstead (K8RI & ARRL life member)
    (N833R, S# CD-2 Worlds oldest Debonair)
    www.rogerhalstead.com
    Roger Halstead, May 13, 2004
    #9
  10. Paul

    gmr2048 Guest

    The flashing areas on the LCD of the D70 are blown out highlights. I
    only know this because a friend has that camera and has shown me that
    feature. I would guess that to avoid this, you should use a faster
    shutter speed, or smaller aperature to allow less light onto the
    sensor. However I could be wrong!

    If you want to avoid seeing the blinking highlights view, you can
    press the directional pad left twice to get to the "normal" view.

    -gary

    On Wed, 12 May 2004 14:59:46 -0700, Paul <>
    wrote:

    >1) I have tried the D70 around home, mostly in the Auto position
    >setting, as I'm a novice with this sophisticated machine.
    >Pictures look great, but when viewing them through the Nikon's
    >built-in LCD (as for example, immediately after shooting them),
    >some show a flashing area, and I learn this is an indication of
    >saturation. This happens even when shooting in the Auto position
    >and with the UV filter on. Should I worry about this? (ISO is set to
    >200)
    >
    gmr2048, May 13, 2004
    #10
  11. Paul

    MikeS Guest

    "gmr2048" <> wrote in message
    news:...
    > The flashing areas on the LCD of the D70 are blown out highlights. I
    > only know this because a friend has that camera and has shown me that
    > feature. I would guess that to avoid this, you should use a faster
    > shutter speed, or smaller aperature to allow less light onto the
    > sensor. However I could be wrong!
    >
    > If you want to avoid seeing the blinking highlights view, you can
    > press the directional pad left twice to get to the "normal" view.


    If you want to aviod the blinking display set the camera to 1 to 1.3 under
    exposurer (Exposure compensation) in the cusom settings and you camera will
    under expose by the amount you dial in. Note if you over expose on a digital
    camera the high lights cannot be adjusted in Photoshop but if you
    underexpose you can always make the image lighter.
    MikeS
    MikeS, May 13, 2004
    #11
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