Nikon D70 for Night Photography

Discussion in 'Digital Photography' started by microchip@anonymousspeech.com, Jan 24, 2007.

  1. Guest

    Adjusting the D70 to 1600 ASA makes it great for night photography. I
    recently took the D70 on a photo shoot at night and found it excellent
    with color saturation increased and ASA set to 1600. Also there are a
    number of helpful web sites which discuss changing the default factory
    menu settings to more usable practical settings (such as turning off
    the beep etc.) Using old 28-105 Nikon AF Lense which migrated from my
    old D-80 which is sitting on the shelf. Shots at night of out door
    sidewalk café scenes, and backlit bakery shop displays were
    impressive. Especially the chocolate and strawberry cheese cakes.
    (jeffrey dach drdach.) Is there a way to push the D-70 to 3200 ASA? Any
    other suggested adjustments to optimize for night photography?

    microchip
     
    , Jan 24, 2007
    #1
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  2. M-M Guest

    In article <>,
    wrote:

    > Is there a way to push the D-70 to 3200 ASA



    The D80 can go up to ISO 3200 by turning off ISO AUTO. Not sure about
    the D70.

    Here is a shot of Orion's belt at 300mm, ISO 3200, 1 sec. Taken through
    a double-pane window. (Non-astronomers will find this photo boring):

    http://www.mhmyers.com/d80/DSC_3818cr.jpg

    --
    m-m
     
    M-M, Jan 24, 2007
    #2
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  3. On 23 Jan 2007 23:44:33 -0800, in rec.photo.digital
    wrote:

    >(jeffrey dach drdach.) Is there a way to push the D-70 to 3200 ASA? Any
    >other suggested adjustments to optimize for night photography?


    Shoot raw and use exposure compensation in the processing.
    --
    Ed Ruf ()
    http://edwardgruf.com/Digital_Photography/General/index.html
     
    Ed Ruf (REPLY to E-MAIL IN SIG!), Jan 24, 2007
    #3
  4. On Wed, 24 Jan 2007 07:45:55 -0500, in rec.photo.digital M-M
    <> wrote:

    >The D80 can go up to ISO 3200 by turning off ISO AUTO. Not sure about
    >the D70.


    Not quite. This is ISO 1600 pushed in the camera, same as in the D200.
    That's why when you select above ISO 1600 it displays H.XX.
    --
    Ed Ruf ()
    http://edwardgruf.com/Digital_Photography/General/index.html
     
    Ed Ruf (REPLY to E-MAIL IN SIG!), Jan 24, 2007
    #4
  5. dbd Guest

    On Jan 24, 3:31 pm, "Ed Ruf (REPLY to E-MAIL IN SIG!)"
    <> wrote:
    > On Wed, 24 Jan 2007 07:45:55 -0500, in rec.photo.digital M-M
    >
    > <> wrote:
    > >The D80 can go up to ISO 3200 by turning off ISO AUTO. Not sure about
    > >the D70.Not quite. This is ISO 1600 pushed in the camera, same as in the D200.

    > That's why when you select above ISO 1600 it displays H.XX.
    > --
    > Ed Ruf ()http://edwardgruf.com/Digital_Photography/General/index.html


    Orion goes better with landscape, but no smoke. Unfortunately I have
    the landscape and smoke and a half full moon here:
    http://dbdimages.smugmug.com/gallery/1491201#122777014

    This is Olympus E500 at 40sec of ISO 100 with noise reduction on, white
    balance to correct color cast from smoke.

    The picture was taken from Dante's view in Death Valley Nat'l Park at
    4am on Jan. 10. Unfortunately, this was downwind from the first major
    Malibu fire of the year. The original is a 7600x3600 pixel panorama.
    Brush fire smoke provides a soft diffuse light for the landscape, but
    doesn't help the night sky. The near foreground ( lower corners) is at
    about 5600' elevetion. The close edge of the salt pan is at -278' and
    the peak below Orion is 11,049'.

    Dale B. Dalrymple
    http://dbdimages.com
     
    dbd, Jan 25, 2007
    #5
  6. M-M Guest

    In article <>,
    "Ed Ruf (REPLY to E-MAIL IN SIG!)" <> wrote:

    > >The D80 can go up to ISO 3200 by turning off ISO AUTO. Not sure about
    > >the D70.

    >
    > Not quite. This is ISO 1600 pushed in the camera, same as in the D200.
    > That's why when you select above ISO 1600 it displays H.XX.



    Aren't all the ISO choices simply software interpolation? What is the
    difference between what the camera does to achieve e.g. ISO 800 vs. ISO
    2000?

    --
    m-m
     
    M-M, Jan 25, 2007
    #6
  7. Paul Rubin Guest

    M-M <> writes:
    > Aren't all the ISO choices simply software interpolation? What is the
    > difference between what the camera does to achieve e.g. ISO 800 vs. ISO
    > 2000?


    Higher iso = the camera cranks up the analog gain on the ccd sense
    amplifiers.
     
    Paul Rubin, Jan 25, 2007
    #7
  8. M-M Guest

    In article <>,
    Paul Rubin <http://> wrote:

    > M-M <> writes:
    > > Aren't all the ISO choices simply software interpolation? What is the
    > > difference between what the camera does to achieve e.g. ISO 800 vs. ISO
    > > 2000?

    >
    > Higher iso = the camera cranks up the analog gain on the ccd sense
    > amplifiers.



    So why does the camera mean by H.XX for ISO >1600?
    --
    m-m
     
    M-M, Jan 25, 2007
    #8
  9. M-M wrote:
    > In article <>,
    > Paul Rubin <http://> wrote:
    >
    >> M-M <> writes:
    >>> Aren't all the ISO choices simply software interpolation? What is the
    >>> difference between what the camera does to achieve e.g. ISO 800 vs. ISO
    >>> 2000?

    >> Higher iso = the camera cranks up the analog gain on the ccd sense
    >> amplifiers.

    >
    >
    > So why does the camera mean by H.XX for ISO >1600?


    Means they'll let you go up to ISO 3200 in 1/3 stop increments, but they
    won't come right out and call it ISO 3200. I don't know if this means
    there are formal standards for stating ISO speeds for digital cameras,
    or if it's their own choice.
     
    David Dyer-Bennet, Jan 25, 2007
    #9
  10. In article <45b92092$0$15011$>,
    David Dyer-Bennet <> wrote:

    > M-M wrote:
    > > In article <>,
    > > Paul Rubin <http://> wrote:
    > >
    > >> M-M <> writes:
    > >>> Aren't all the ISO choices simply software interpolation? What is the
    > >>> difference between what the camera does to achieve e.g. ISO 800 vs. ISO
    > >>> 2000?
    > >> Higher iso = the camera cranks up the analog gain on the ccd sense
    > >> amplifiers.

    > >
    > >
    > > So why does the camera mean by H.XX for ISO >1600?

    >
    > Means they'll let you go up to ISO 3200 in 1/3 stop increments, but they
    > won't come right out and call it ISO 3200. I don't know if this means
    > there are formal standards for stating ISO speeds for digital cameras,
    > or if it's their own choice.


    No matter what it is or how it is done, it works. My D-50 is almost
    free of noise at 1600 but my SIL's D70 is noticeable at 800.

    I have taken some great pre-dawn and after dusk shots with the D50.

    --
    "When fascism comes to America, it will be wrapped in the flag and
    carrying a cross."
    Sinclair Lewis
     
    Ockham's Razor, Jan 26, 2007
    #10
  11. dbd Guest

    On Jan 23, 11:44 pm, wrote:
    > Adjusting the D70 to 1600 ASA makes it great for night photography. I

    ....
    > (jeffrey dach drdach.) Is there a way to push the D-70 to 3200 ASA? Any
    > other suggested adjustments to optimize for night photography?
    >
    > microchip


    Why would you want to use high ASA with its higher noise instead of
    longer exposure? Your example of Orion is a subject that is not moving.
    Then you just need to make the camera not move during the exposure.
    Some DSLRs provide a noise calcelling function to remove hot pixel
    noise during long exposures.

    Dale B. Dalrymple
    http://dbdimages.com
     
    dbd, Jan 26, 2007
    #11
  12. M-M Guest

    In article <>,
    "dbd" <> wrote:

    > Why would you want to use high ASA with its higher noise instead of
    > longer exposure? Your example of Orion is a subject that is not moving.
    > Then you just need to make the camera not move during the exposure.



    Orion is indeed moving, or rather the earth is moving. At 300mm,
    exposures >2 sec leave stars as streaks rather than points of light.

    --
    m-m
     
    M-M, Jan 26, 2007
    #12
  13. LuvLatins Guest

    On 25 Jan 2007 17:23:32 -0800, "dbd" <> wrote:

    >
    >
    >On Jan 23, 11:44 pm, wrote:
    >> Adjusting the D70 to 1600 ASA makes it great for night photography. I

    >...
    >> (jeffrey dach drdach.) Is there a way to push the D-70 to 3200 ASA? Any
    >> other suggested adjustments to optimize for night photography?
    >>
    >> microchip

    >
    >Why would you want to use high ASA with its higher noise instead of
    >longer exposure? Your example of Orion is a subject that is not moving.
    >Then you just need to make the camera not move during the exposure.
    >Some DSLRs provide a noise calcelling function to remove hot pixel
    >noise during long exposures.
    >
    >Dale B. Dalrymple
    >http://dbdimages.com



    Someone recently complained that the NR feture on the D200 prevented
    the camera on a telescope from accuratley taking night time pictures
    of the sky. It apparently confused the camea into thinking that the
    starts were noise and eliminated some starts. The poster complained
    to Nikon and said they ignored his request to put a fix in the
    firmware. He later stated that he found a work around. He would take
    his picture, (Long Exposure of Several Minutes) Then as soon as the
    sutter closed he would power off the camera. Apparently this turning
    off of the camera forces it to write what it has in memory and avoids
    the NR filter from running. I tried it and it does dump whats in
    memory and prevent the NR filter from running. I wonder however after
    seeing some of your night shots in this thread why he was having
    issues. It looks like the camera does not remove or change the sky
    and knows the difference between stars and camera noise. I dont know
    because I dont have mine on a telescope. Interesting thread and nice
    night shots guys.
     
    LuvLatins, Jan 28, 2007
    #13
  14. Roger Guest

    On Sun, 28 Jan 2007 12:43:15 -0500, LuvLatins <>
    wrote:

    >On 25 Jan 2007 17:23:32 -0800, "dbd" <> wrote:
    >
    >>
    >>
    >>On Jan 23, 11:44 pm, wrote:
    >>> Adjusting the D70 to 1600 ASA makes it great for night photography. I

    >>...
    >>> (jeffrey dach drdach.) Is there a way to push the D-70 to 3200 ASA? Any
    >>> other suggested adjustments to optimize for night photography?
    >>>
    >>> microchip

    >>
    >>Why would you want to use high ASA with its higher noise instead of
    >>longer exposure? Your example of Orion is a subject that is not moving.
    >>Then you just need to make the camera not move during the exposure.
    >>Some DSLRs provide a noise calcelling function to remove hot pixel
    >>noise during long exposures.
    >>
    >>Dale B. Dalrymple
    >>http://dbdimages.com

    >
    >
    >Someone recently complained that the NR feture on the D200 prevented
    >the camera on a telescope from accuratley taking night time pictures
    >of the sky. It apparently confused the camea into thinking that the


    The NR does not work that way. The camera taks a photo, then closes
    the shutter and takes another photo of the same duration with the idea
    that the noise will be consistent in both frames. It then subtracts
    the second frame from the first and saves the processed image. As the
    noise is thermal in nature I'm a bit surprised that it works quite
    well.


    >starts were noise and eliminated some starts. The poster complained
    >to Nikon and said they ignored his request to put a fix in the
    >firmware. He later stated that he found a work around. He would take
    >his picture, (Long Exposure of Several Minutes) Then as soon as the


    If he was doing that it'd make more sense to just turn off the NR. It
    should be off by default.

    >sutter closed he would power off the camera. Apparently this turning
    >off of the camera forces it to write what it has in memory and avoids
    >the NR filter from running. I tried it and it does dump whats in
    >memory and prevent the NR filter from running. I wonder however after
    >seeing some of your night shots in this thread why he was having
    >issues. It looks like the camera does not remove or change the sky
    >and knows the difference between stars and camera noise. I dont know
    >because I dont have mine on a telescope. Interesting thread and nice
    >night shots guys.

    Roger Halstead (K8RI & ARRL life member)
    (N833R, S# CD-2 Worlds oldest Debonair)
    www.rogerhalstead.com
     
    Roger, Jan 29, 2007
    #14
  15. On Sun, 28 Jan 2007 23:31:33 -0500, in rec.photo.digital Roger
    <> wrote:

    >The NR does not work that way. The camera taks a photo, then closes
    >the shutter and takes another photo of the same duration with the idea
    >that the noise will be consistent in both frames. It then subtracts
    >the second frame from the first and saves the processed image. As the
    >noise is thermal in nature I'm a bit surprised that it works quite
    >well.


    Note that the Nikon D200 and D80 have two types of NR. That is how the Long
    Exp NR functions, but not the High ISO noise reduction as per

    p 131 of the fine manual for the D200
    p 83 of the fine manual for the D80

    The D70 does only has the Long Exp NR (dark frame subtraction).
    --
    Ed Ruf ()
    http://edwardgruf.com/Digital_Photography/General/index.html
     
    Ed Ruf (REPLY to E-MAIL IN SIG!), Jan 30, 2007
    #15
  16. Roger Guest

    On Tue, 30 Jan 2007 05:58:35 -0500, "Ed Ruf (REPLY to E-MAIL IN
    SIG!)" <> wrote:

    >On Sun, 28 Jan 2007 23:31:33 -0500, in rec.photo.digital Roger
    ><> wrote:
    >
    >>The NR does not work that way. The camera taks a photo, then closes
    >>the shutter and takes another photo of the same duration with the idea
    >>that the noise will be consistent in both frames. It then subtracts
    >>the second frame from the first and saves the processed image. As the
    >>noise is thermal in nature I'm a bit surprised that it works quite
    >>well.

    >
    >Note that the Nikon D200 and D80 have two types of NR. That is how the Long
    >Exp NR functions, but not the High ISO noise reduction as per


    Thanks Ed,I was under the impression they were all using the same
    method.

    >
    >p 131 of the fine manual for the D200
    >p 83 of the fine manual for the D80
    >
    >The D70 does only has the Long Exp NR (dark frame subtraction).



    Roger Halstead (K8RI & ARRL life member)
    (N833R, S# CD-2 Worlds oldest Debonair)
    www.rogerhalstead.com
     
    Roger, Jan 31, 2007
    #16
  17. M-M <> wrote:
    > In article <>,
    > wrote:
    >
    >> Is there a way to push the D-70 to 3200 ASA

    >
    >
    > The D80 can go up to ISO 3200 by turning off ISO AUTO. Not sure about
    > the D70.
    >
    > Here is a shot of Orion's belt at 300mm, ISO 3200, 1 sec. Taken through
    > a double-pane window. (Non-astronomers will find this photo boring):
    >
    > http://www.mhmyers.com/d80/DSC_3818cr.jpg
    >


    Why through double-pane glass? It seems the sky is a bit accessible, eh?

    --
    Thomas T. Veldhouse
    Key Fingerprint: D281 77A5 63EE 82C5 5E68 00E4 7868 0ADC 4EFB 39F0
     
    Thomas T. Veldhouse, Feb 2, 2007
    #17
  18. David Dyer-Bennet <> wrote:
    >
    > Means they'll let you go up to ISO 3200 in 1/3 stop increments, but they
    > won't come right out and call it ISO 3200. I don't know if this means
    > there are formal standards for stating ISO speeds for digital cameras,
    > or if it's their own choice.


    I do believe that it means they use software to achieve ISO3200. You could
    take the image at ISO1600 and achieve the same results [theoretically] in
    photoshop. ISO1600 and below are acheived by increased gain at the sensor,
    which should yield better results as it will capture more information than
    using software, which gains no information.

    --
    Thomas T. Veldhouse
    Key Fingerprint: D281 77A5 63EE 82C5 5E68 00E4 7868 0ADC 4EFB 39F0
     
    Thomas T. Veldhouse, Feb 2, 2007
    #18
  19. M-M Guest

    In article <Q6Iwh.4484$>,
    "Thomas T. Veldhouse" <> wrote:

    > > Here is a shot of Orion's belt at 300mm, ISO 3200, 1 sec. Taken through
    > > a double-pane window. (Non-astronomers will find this photo boring):
    > >
    > > http://www.mhmyers.com/d80/DSC_3818cr.jpg
    > >

    >
    > Why through double-pane glass? It seems the sky is a bit accessible, eh?



    It was cold and I was ready for bed :)

    --
    m-m
     
    M-M, Feb 2, 2007
    #19
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