Night shots

Discussion in 'Digital Photography' started by Peter Booth, Feb 9, 2004.

  1. Peter Booth

    Peter Booth Guest

    Photographing the moon, Hi Guys , I'm an amateur and experimenting with my
    second digital camera . This one is an Olympus c5060 and have been trying to
    take some shots of the moon that shines real brightly here in New Zealand .
    I obviously need to use a filter as any shots I take are over bright as its
    obviously sampling from the sky rather than on the
    moon itself and one shot it had rays so that it looked more like the sun.Are
    there any tutorials that you can recommend for night shooting .? I can
    always
    play around with them in Photoshop but the amount I have to means it
    wouldn't be
    anything like real photography??
     
    Peter Booth, Feb 9, 2004
    #1
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  2. Peter Booth

    John O. Guest

    "Peter Booth" <> wrote in message
    news:c078a1$q8v$...
    > I obviously need to use a filter as any shots I take are over bright as

    its
    > obviously sampling from the sky rather than on the
    > moon itself and one shot it had rays so that it looked more like the sun.


    You don't need a filter. With a bright, full moon you can play around with
    the "sunny f16 rule" and get a good exposure. Bracket around 125th at f/16
    with ISO set to 100. The moon is under daylight, afterall.

    John O.
     
    John O., Feb 9, 2004
    #2
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  3. Peter Booth

    Alan Terry Guest

    In article <c078a1$q8v$>, Peter Booth
    <> writes

    >This one is an Olympus c5060 and have been trying to
    >take some shots of the moon that shines real brightly here in New Zealand .


    The moon that shines here is pretty bright too - what colour is yours?

    :eek:)

    --
    Alan ............
     
    Alan Terry, Feb 9, 2004
    #3
  4. Peter Booth

    WoZ Guest

    Peter I am in Australia so I imagine our perspectives aren't that different.

    I get excellent results with quite good definition at 1/320 at a wide
    aperature (5.6) on ISO 100. Use a tripod of course.

    "Peter Booth" <> wrote in message
    news:c078a1$q8v$...
    > Photographing the moon, Hi Guys , I'm an amateur and experimenting with my
    > second digital camera . This one is an Olympus c5060 and have been trying

    to
    > take some shots of the moon that shines real brightly here in New Zealand

    ..
    > I obviously need to use a filter as any shots I take are over bright as

    its
    > obviously sampling from the sky rather than on the
    > moon itself and one shot it had rays so that it looked more like the

    sun.Are
    > there any tutorials that you can recommend for night shooting .? I can
    > always
    > play around with them in Photoshop but the amount I have to means it
    > wouldn't be
    > anything like real photography??
    >
    >
     
    WoZ, Feb 9, 2004
    #4
  5. Peter,

    a bit off-topic, I am afraid:
    What about focal lenght?
    I learned that with 35 mm film one would like to have f = 1000 mm to get a
    sizable image on the film.

    Guenter
     
    Guenter Fieblinger, Feb 9, 2004
    #5
  6. Peter Booth

    gr Guest

    "Peter Booth" <> wrote
    > Photographing the moon, Hi Guys , I'm an amateur and experimenting with my
    > second digital camera . This one is an Olympus c5060 and have been trying

    to
    > take some shots of the moon that shines real brightly here in New Zealand

    ..
    > I obviously need to use a filter as any shots I take are over bright as

    its
    > obviously sampling from the sky rather than on the
    > moon itself and one shot it had rays so that it looked more like the

    sun.Are
    > there any tutorials that you can recommend for night shooting .? I can
    > always
    > play around with them in Photoshop but the amount I have to means it
    > wouldn't be
    > anything like real photography??



    Change your exposure method to spot, rather than iESP. (It should be a
    button on the top of the camera, if it's like the C5050.) Or, set the camera
    to manual mode, and use something like ISO64, f4, and 1/500 sec.
     
    gr, Feb 9, 2004
    #6
  7. Peter Booth

    Azzz1588 Guest

    In article <>, Alan Terry
    <> writes:

    >The moon that shines here is pretty bright too - what colour is yours?



    Depends on wether he is using a foevon chip camera or not...






















    "Only a Gentleman can insult me, and a true Gentleman never will..."
     
    Azzz1588, Feb 9, 2004
    #7
  8. Peter Booth

    Peter Booth Guest

    Thanks for all that advice guys I'll try it ASAP. By the way, my comment on
    the brightness of the moon here. We do have really clear skies with a lot
    less pollution in our part of the world . I was in Europe last summer and
    took some scenic shots and in Barcelona there was no clear definition
    between the sky and the sea. Was it just the heat haze?
    "gr" <> wrote in message
    news:c08233$141rdr$-berlin.de...
    > "Peter Booth" <> wrote
    > > Photographing the moon, Hi Guys , I'm an amateur and experimenting with

    my
    > > second digital camera . This one is an Olympus c5060 and have been

    trying
    > to
    > > take some shots of the moon that shines real brightly here in New

    Zealand
    > .
    > > I obviously need to use a filter as any shots I take are over bright as

    > its
    > > obviously sampling from the sky rather than on the
    > > moon itself and one shot it had rays so that it looked more like the

    > sun.Are
    > > there any tutorials that you can recommend for night shooting .? I can
    > > always
    > > play around with them in Photoshop but the amount I have to means it
    > > wouldn't be
    > > anything like real photography??

    >
    >
    > Change your exposure method to spot, rather than iESP. (It should be a
    > button on the top of the camera, if it's like the C5050.) Or, set the

    camera
    > to manual mode, and use something like ISO64, f4, and 1/500 sec.
    >
    >
     
    Peter Booth, Feb 9, 2004
    #8
  9. On Mon, 09 Feb 2004 11:47:11 +0100, Guenter Fieblinger
    <> wrote:

    >Peter,
    >
    >a bit off-topic, I am afraid:
    >What about focal lenght?
    >I learned that with 35 mm film one would like to have f = 1000 mm to get a


    http://www.rogerhalstead.com/Sunspots.htm

    Not the best, but the Moon at roughly 2500 mm f-10 on a full frame 35.
    The moon would be slightly larger than full frame (if it were a full
    moon) The exposure was *probably* 1/125, or 1/250
    The moon is very bright. With a normal lens and built in metering the
    tend is to drastically over expose.

    The Sun was shot with approximately 1600 mm @ f6.4 and a Solar Filter.

    Roger Halstead (K8RI & ARRL life member)
    (N833R, S# CD-2 Worlds oldest Debonair)
    www.rogerhalstead.com

    >sizable image on the film.
    >
    >Guenter
    >
     
    Roger Halstead, Feb 9, 2004
    #9
  10. Peter Booth

    Tony Spadaro Guest

    Go to manual set your ISO for 100 and bracket around f11 at 1/100th second.
    THe moon is lower in the summer so you may have to open up more than your
    lens allows - but you can go to 1/50th etc for more opening.
    In the winter when the moon is higher in the sky you would bracket around
    f16.

    --
    http://www.chapelhillnoir.com
    home of The Camera-ist's Manifesto
    The Improved Links Pages are at
    http://www.chapelhillnoir.com/links/mlinks00.html
    A sample chapter from my novel "Haight-Ashbury" is at
    http://www.chapelhillnoir.com/writ/hait/hatitl.html
    "Peter Booth" <> wrote in message
    news:c078a1$q8v$...
    > Photographing the moon, Hi Guys , I'm an amateur and experimenting with my
    > second digital camera . This one is an Olympus c5060 and have been trying

    to
    > take some shots of the moon that shines real brightly here in New Zealand

    ..
    > I obviously need to use a filter as any shots I take are over bright as

    its
    > obviously sampling from the sky rather than on the
    > moon itself and one shot it had rays so that it looked more like the

    sun.Are
    > there any tutorials that you can recommend for night shooting .? I can
    > always
    > play around with them in Photoshop but the amount I have to means it
    > wouldn't be
    > anything like real photography??
    >
    >
     
    Tony Spadaro, Feb 9, 2004
    #10
  11. Peter Booth

    Jack Yeazel Guest

    Peter Booth wrote:
    >
    > Photographing the moon, Hi Guys , I'm an amateur and experimenting with my
    > second digital camera . This one is an Olympus c5060 and have been trying to
    > take some shots of the moon that shines real brightly here in New Zealand .


    Here is one with a Nikon 990 with a 2x teleconverter and 4x digital zoom -which
    is 920mm:
    http://www.gpsinformation.org/jack/photo-test/moon229-a.jpg
    Not as clear as Roger's 1600 mm sun shot...

    --
    Jack

    Get general GPS information at: http://www.gpsinformation.net/
     
    Jack Yeazel, Feb 9, 2004
    #11
  12. Peter Booth

    gr Guest

    "Tony Spadaro" <> wrote
    > Go to manual set your ISO for 100 and bracket around f11 at 1/100th

    second.
    > THe moon is lower in the summer so you may have to open up more than your
    > lens allows - but you can go to 1/50th etc for more opening.
    > In the winter when the moon is higher in the sky you would bracket

    around
    > f16.



    Hey Beavis, READ THE MESSAGE. He's using a C5060. It's a digicam, not a
    dSLR! It's minimum aperature is f8, not f16!

    Oh, and why would you tell him to set his ISO to 100?!? He should use the
    minimum so as to minimize noise.


    > "Peter Booth" <> wrote in message
    > news:c078a1$q8v$...
    > > Photographing the moon, Hi Guys , I'm an amateur and experimenting with

    my
    > > second digital camera . This one is an Olympus c5060 and have been

    trying
    > to
    > > take some shots of the moon that shines real brightly here in New

    Zealand
    > .
     
    gr, Feb 9, 2004
    #12
  13. Peter Booth

    Guest

    In message <70IVb.20644$>,
    "John O." <> wrote:

    >"Peter Booth" <> wrote in message
    >news:c078a1$q8v$...
    >> I obviously need to use a filter as any shots I take are over bright as

    >its
    >> obviously sampling from the sky rather than on the
    >> moon itself and one shot it had rays so that it looked more like the sun.

    >
    >You don't need a filter. With a bright, full moon you can play around with
    >the "sunny f16 rule" and get a good exposure. Bracket around 125th at f/16
    >with ISO set to 100. The moon is under daylight, afterall.


    When the moon is high in the sky it is at its brightest, but still not
    bright enough for sunny f16 @ the iso for shutter speed. Unlike
    shooting most things on the ground, the moon loses a lot of light to
    diffusion, and gains no light from the diffusion of nearby objects,
    because the surrounding area is dark night sky, and has little to
    contribute (normally, distant objects on the ground lose light to
    diffusion, but gain diffused light from other areas, normalizing the
    light levels, but losing contrast). The highlights on a full moon don't
    really go more than about a stop over the average, so you could
    over-expose it a stop or two with digital, depending on the camera, for
    a lower effective-ISO.

    When it is near the horizon, it is many stops darker. I tried shooting
    the moon a few weeks ago when it was right on the horizon, with 600mm of
    glass, and I could barely hand-hold it at ISO 1600, at f8.
    --

    <>>< ><<> ><<> <>>< ><<> <>>< <>>< ><<>
    John P Sheehy <>
    ><<> <>>< <>>< ><<> <>>< ><<> ><<> <>><
     
    , Feb 9, 2004
    #13
  14. Peter Booth

    Tony Spadaro Guest

    Are you as stupid as you appear to be from this post? If you had ever
    heard of reciprocity you would know that f16 at 1/100th sesond is the same
    thing as f 8 at 1/400th etc. Now go back and read you Barbiecam instructions
    a few more times and stop bothering the adults.

    --
    http://www.chapelhillnoir.com
    home of The Camera-ist's Manifesto
    The Improved Links Pages are at
    http://www.chapelhillnoir.com/links/mlinks00.html
    A sample chapter from my novel "Haight-Ashbury" is at
    http://www.chapelhillnoir.com/writ/hait/hatitl.html
    "gr" <> wrote in message
    news:c08smq$146rh1$-berlin.de...
    > "Tony Spadaro" <> wrote
    > > Go to manual set your ISO for 100 and bracket around f11 at 1/100th

    > second.
    > > THe moon is lower in the summer so you may have to open up more than

    your
    > > lens allows - but you can go to 1/50th etc for more opening.
    > > In the winter when the moon is higher in the sky you would bracket

    > around
    > > f16.

    >
    >
    > Hey Beavis, READ THE MESSAGE. He's using a C5060. It's a digicam, not a
    > dSLR! It's minimum aperature is f8, not f16!
    >
    > Oh, and why would you tell him to set his ISO to 100?!? He should use the
    > minimum so as to minimize noise.
    >
    >
    > > "Peter Booth" <> wrote in message
    > > news:c078a1$q8v$...
    > > > Photographing the moon, Hi Guys , I'm an amateur and experimenting

    with
    > my
    > > > second digital camera . This one is an Olympus c5060 and have been

    > trying
    > > to
    > > > take some shots of the moon that shines real brightly here in New

    > Zealand
    > > .

    >
    >
     
    Tony Spadaro, Feb 9, 2004
    #14
  15. Peter Booth

    Tony Spadaro Guest

    Don't bother with the spot meter as the moon is still going to be pretty
    small in the frame unless you have a 300-500 mm lens on you camera. gr is an
    idiot.

    --
    http://www.chapelhillnoir.com
    home of The Camera-ist's Manifesto
    The Improved Links Pages are at
    http://www.chapelhillnoir.com/links/mlinks00.html
    A sample chapter from my novel "Haight-Ashbury" is at
    http://www.chapelhillnoir.com/writ/hait/hatitl.html
    "Peter Booth" <> wrote in message
    news:c08ifm$qbb$...
    > Thanks for all that advice guys I'll try it ASAP. By the way, my comment

    on
    > the brightness of the moon here. We do have really clear skies with a lot
    > less pollution in our part of the world . I was in Europe last summer and
    > took some scenic shots and in Barcelona there was no clear definition
    > between the sky and the sea. Was it just the heat haze?
    > "gr" <> wrote in message
    > news:c08233$141rdr$-berlin.de...
    > > "Peter Booth" <> wrote
    > > > Photographing the moon, Hi Guys , I'm an amateur and experimenting

    with
    > my
    > > > second digital camera . This one is an Olympus c5060 and have been

    > trying
    > > to
    > > > take some shots of the moon that shines real brightly here in New

    > Zealand
    > > .
    > > > I obviously need to use a filter as any shots I take are over bright

    as
    > > its
    > > > obviously sampling from the sky rather than on the
    > > > moon itself and one shot it had rays so that it looked more like the

    > > sun.Are
    > > > there any tutorials that you can recommend for night shooting .? I can
    > > > always
    > > > play around with them in Photoshop but the amount I have to means it
    > > > wouldn't be
    > > > anything like real photography??

    > >
    > >
    > > Change your exposure method to spot, rather than iESP. (It should be a
    > > button on the top of the camera, if it's like the C5050.) Or, set the

    > camera
    > > to manual mode, and use something like ISO64, f4, and 1/500 sec.
    > >
    > >

    >
    >
     
    Tony Spadaro, Feb 9, 2004
    #15
  16. Nice pictures, Roger.

    Guenter
     
    Guenter Fieblinger, Feb 10, 2004
    #16
  17. Peter Booth

    gr Guest

    "Tony Spadaro" <> wrote
    > Are you as stupid as you appear to be from this post? If you had ever
    > heard of reciprocity you would know that f16 at 1/100th sesond is the same
    > thing as f 8 at 1/400th etc. Now go back and read you Barbiecam

    instructions
    > a few more times and stop bothering the adults.



    I guess you still don't "get it". Here's a clue: the C-5060 DOESN'T HAVE AN
    F16 SETTING! Telling him to shoot at f16 is stupid. If you knew anything
    about digicams, you'd realize that. Oh, and telling him to shoot at ISO100
    is stupid, too. He should be shooting at the minimum ISO (which I believe is
    ISO80 for his camera).



    >
    > --
    > http://www.chapelhillnoir.com
    > home of The Camera-ist's Manifesto
    > The Improved Links Pages are at
    > http://www.chapelhillnoir.com/links/mlinks00.html
    > A sample chapter from my novel "Haight-Ashbury" is at
    > http://www.chapelhillnoir.com/writ/hait/hatitl.html
    > "gr" <> wrote in message
    > news:c08smq$146rh1$-berlin.de...
    > > "Tony Spadaro" <> wrote
    > > > Go to manual set your ISO for 100 and bracket around f11 at 1/100th

    > > second.
    > > > THe moon is lower in the summer so you may have to open up more than

    > your
    > > > lens allows - but you can go to 1/50th etc for more opening.
    > > > In the winter when the moon is higher in the sky you would bracket

    > > around
    > > > f16.

    > >
    > >
    > > Hey Beavis, READ THE MESSAGE. He's using a C5060. It's a digicam, not a
    > > dSLR! It's minimum aperature is f8, not f16!
    > >
    > > Oh, and why would you tell him to set his ISO to 100?!? He should use

    the
    > > minimum so as to minimize noise.
    > >
    > >
    > > > "Peter Booth" <> wrote in message
    > > > news:c078a1$q8v$...
    > > > > Photographing the moon, Hi Guys , I'm an amateur and experimenting

    > with
    > > my
    > > > > second digital camera . This one is an Olympus c5060 and have been

    > > trying
    > > > to
    > > > > take some shots of the moon that shines real brightly here in New

    > > Zealand
    > > > .

    > >
    > >

    >
    >
     
    gr, Feb 10, 2004
    #17
  18. Peter Booth

    Tony Spadaro Guest

    And you are still being an ass. F16 at 1/100 is the same exposure as f8 at
    1/400th. If you can't do math go back to school.
    At ISO 100 the ccalculations for the, so called "sunny 16 rule"
    (something us adults know about but that is apparently not taught in your
    pre-school) are very simple. Any photographer knows that ISO 80 is 1/3rd of
    a stop slower than ISO 100 and knows to open up the aperture or slow the
    shutter by that amount.
    I realise this is all new to your little world and suggest you get a book
    or two on photography and haev your mother read it to you, before you
    attempt to correct information that is correct, again.
    The biggest problem with the usenets is dorks like you - arrogance and
    ignorance are a bad mix, Now into the killfile for you. I haven't the time
    to educate those who cannot learn.

    --
    http://www.chapelhillnoir.com
    home of The Camera-ist's Manifesto
    The Improved Links Pages are at
    http://www.chapelhillnoir.com/links/mlinks00.html
    A sample chapter from my novel "Haight-Ashbury" is at
    http://www.chapelhillnoir.com/writ/hait/hatitl.html
    "gr" <> wrote in message
    news:c0ai8d$14t0a2$-berlin.de...
    > "Tony Spadaro" <> wrote
    > > Are you as stupid as you appear to be from this post? If you had

    ever
    > > heard of reciprocity you would know that f16 at 1/100th sesond is the

    same
    > > thing as f 8 at 1/400th etc. Now go back and read you Barbiecam

    > instructions
    > > a few more times and stop bothering the adults.

    >
    >
    > I guess you still don't "get it". Here's a clue: the C-5060 DOESN'T HAVE

    AN
    > F16 SETTING! Telling him to shoot at f16 is stupid. If you knew anything
    > about digicams, you'd realize that. Oh, and telling him to shoot at ISO100
    > is stupid, too. He should be shooting at the minimum ISO (which I believe

    is
    > ISO80 for his camera).
    >
    >
    >
    > >
    > > --
    > > http://www.chapelhillnoir.com
    > > home of The Camera-ist's Manifesto
    > > The Improved Links Pages are at
    > > http://www.chapelhillnoir.com/links/mlinks00.html
    > > A sample chapter from my novel "Haight-Ashbury" is at
    > > http://www.chapelhillnoir.com/writ/hait/hatitl.html
    > > "gr" <> wrote in message
    > > news:c08smq$146rh1$-berlin.de...
    > > > "Tony Spadaro" <> wrote
    > > > > Go to manual set your ISO for 100 and bracket around f11 at 1/100th
    > > > second.
    > > > > THe moon is lower in the summer so you may have to open up more than

    > > your
    > > > > lens allows - but you can go to 1/50th etc for more opening.
    > > > > In the winter when the moon is higher in the sky you would

    bracket
    > > > around
    > > > > f16.
    > > >
    > > >
    > > > Hey Beavis, READ THE MESSAGE. He's using a C5060. It's a digicam, not

    a
    > > > dSLR! It's minimum aperature is f8, not f16!
    > > >
    > > > Oh, and why would you tell him to set his ISO to 100?!? He should use

    > the
    > > > minimum so as to minimize noise.
    > > >
    > > >
    > > > > "Peter Booth" <> wrote in message
    > > > > news:c078a1$q8v$...
    > > > > > Photographing the moon, Hi Guys , I'm an amateur and experimenting

    > > with
    > > > my
    > > > > > second digital camera . This one is an Olympus c5060 and have been
    > > > trying
    > > > > to
    > > > > > take some shots of the moon that shines real brightly here in New
    > > > Zealand
    > > > > .
    > > >
    > > >

    > >
    > >

    >
    >
     
    Tony Spadaro, Feb 10, 2004
    #18
  19. On Tue, 10 Feb 2004 12:27:06 +0100, Guenter Fieblinger
    <> wrote:

    >Nice pictures, Roger.


    Thanks,

    If we get some clear sky, I hope to get some new moon shots and maybe
    some sun spots, if the sun starts showing some activity.

    I missed the big sunspot groups a month or two back. My back yard has
    18 inches of snow on the level.

    Roger Halstead (K8RI & ARRL life member)
    (N833R, S# CD-2 Worlds oldest Debonair)
    www.rogerhalstead.com
    >
    >Guenter
    >
    >
     
    Roger Halstead, Feb 11, 2004
    #19
  20. Peter Booth

    Alan Browne Guest

    John O. wrote:


    > You don't need a filter. With a bright, full moon you can play around with
    > the "sunny f16 rule" and get a good exposure. Bracket around 125th at f/16
    > with ISO set to 100. The moon is under daylight, afterall.
    >
    > John O.


    When the moon is low, use "Luner 'leven" f/11 @ ISOish. You can say
    bracket, but usually no problem.


    --
    e-meil: there's no such thing as a FreeLunch.
     
    Alan Browne, Feb 13, 2004
    #20
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