New XTi owner with questions

Discussion in 'Digital Photography' started by mktgny@optonline.net, Nov 22, 2006.

  1. Guest

    This is my first digital camera. I held onto film like others before me
    held on to vinyl music.

    Now that I'm here I have a few questions:

    Do filters that work with SLRs also work with DSLRs?

    Do I need a UV filter as well as a circular polarizer? These were my
    primary filters with film.

    Is this self-cleansing mechanism of the sensor actually a useful tool
    or marketing hype?

    Thanks for any answers and any other advice with this camera.
    , Nov 22, 2006
    #1
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  2. Ken Lucke Guest

    In article <>,
    <> wrote:

    > This is my first digital camera. I held onto film like others before me
    > held on to vinyl music.
    >
    > Now that I'm here I have a few questions:
    >
    > Do filters that work with SLRs also work with DSLRs?


    Yes. You're only changing the medium used to record the image [digital
    memory v. film emulsion], not how you take the image in the first
    place.

    > Do I need a UV filter as well as a circular polarizer? These were my
    > primary filters with film.


    IMO, no. Others will argue. I go with the polarizer 99% of the time,
    unless I need the extra light, but most of those shots are done with a
    tripod, so I can usually afford the light loss. I threw away my UV
    filter years ago, long before digital, as I found the polarizer to be
    much more effective in all circumstances than the UV filter ever
    dreamed of being.

    > Is this self-cleansing mechanism of the sensor actually a useful tool
    > or marketing hype?


    From my experience and some tests reported here, it's more marketing
    hype. The final verdict is still out, but it seems to only dislodge a
    small portion of any actual dust. If dust becomes a problem, learn to
    clean your own sensor (be aware that this could void your warranty if
    discovered). Here's a reference to help you learn to do so:
    http://www.cleaningdigitalcameras.com/


    > Thanks for any answers and any other advice with this camera.
    >
    Ken Lucke, Nov 22, 2006
    #2
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  3. Bill Funk Guest

    On 22 Nov 2006 10:57:20 -0800, wrote:

    <Personal Opinion>

    >This is my first digital camera. I held onto film like others before me
    >held on to vinyl music.
    >
    >Now that I'm here I have a few questions:
    >
    >Do filters that work with SLRs also work with DSLRs?


    Yes. And they doo about the same things, too.
    >
    >Do I need a UV filter as well as a circular polarizer? These were my
    >primary filters with film.


    I use a UV filter on my 3 lenses. Not because trey filter out any UV
    light (most DSLRs have a UV filter over ther sensor already) but
    because they offer protection. (My favorite story about this is when
    the filter got bashed by a turkey leg at the Renn Festival; the filter
    wasn't damaged, but cleaning it was a mess.)
    Many photographers don't go places or shoot things that can damage
    their lenses; for them, UV filters are a bad thing. For many of us,
    though, UV filters do perform a protective role.
    UV filters do provide an extra glass piece that can reduce contrast
    and add glare or reflections to the image.
    It's up to you to determine if the peace of mind the protections
    offers is worth any perceived loss to your pictures' quality.

    Polarizing filters are great! I like mine for the effects it offers.
    However, I do not understand why anyone would keep one on all the time
    for the density it offers. A neutral-density filter would be much
    better for this.
    >
    >Is this self-cleansing mechanism of the sensor actually a useful tool
    >or marketing hype?


    Not in my opinion. As I've posted before, dust does not act the way it
    would need to for such a system to work. It's a marketing tool.
    Cleaning the sensor is a maintenance task that needs to be done
    periodically.
    >
    >Thanks for any answers and any other advice with this camera.


    --
    Bill Funk
    replace "g" with "a"
    Bill Funk, Nov 22, 2006
    #3
  4. "Ken Lucke" <> wrote in message
    news:221120061118230195%...

    > From my experience and some tests reported here, it's more marketing
    > hype. The final verdict is still out, but it seems to only dislodge a
    > small portion of any actual dust. If dust becomes a problem, learn to
    > clean your own sensor (be aware that this could void your warranty if
    > discovered....


    My D70s has a "mirror lockup" mode specifically designed for sensor
    cleaning, so I doubt it would void the warranty unless you started damaging
    the sensor by using inappropiate cleaning gear.

    cheers adrian www.boliston.co.uk
    Adrian Boliston, Nov 22, 2006
    #4
  5. Bill Hilton Guest

    > wrote:
    >
    > Do filters that work with SLRs also work with DSLRs?


    You can skip the 'color correction' filters since you can do this step
    with the white balance controls when you convert from RAW.

    > Do I need a UV filter as well as a circular polarizer? These were my
    > primary filters with film.


    You need a polarizer. You don't "need" a UV filter but it's a personal
    choice so if you want it to protect the lens go ahead ...

    > Is this self-cleansing mechanism of the sensor actually a useful tool
    > or marketing hype?


    The ASC (Auto Sensor Clean) doesn't seem to work well ... I've looked
    at two XTi cameras that had a total of 42 dust specks when shipped by
    Canon and the ASC function didn't remove a single one of them even
    after repeated cycles. So this one appears to be hype.

    The DDD (Dust Data Delete) software mapping does seem to work well
    though, but you'll have to use the Canon RAW converter to take
    advantage of it.

    So 50-50 ...

    > Thanks for any answers and any other advice with this camera.


    Two other bits of advice ... because the pixel pitch is tight it can
    resolve pretty well, so getting a lens with good optics will pay off.
    Also, I think the images look good at ISO 100 and 200 but at ISO 400
    and higher you really start to see the noise, especially if you run
    them thru any processing steps (shadow/highlight, USM etc). So it pays
    to get faster lenses so you can shoot at lower ISO settings, I think.

    Bill
    Bill Hilton, Nov 22, 2006
    #5
  6. "Bill Funk" <> wrote in message
    news:...

    > I use a UV filter on my 3 lenses. Not because trey filter out any UV
    > light (most DSLRs have a UV filter over ther sensor already) but
    > because they offer protection. (My favorite story about this is when
    > the filter got bashed by a turkey leg at the Renn Festival; the filter
    > wasn't damaged, but cleaning it was a mess.)
    > Many photographers don't go places or shoot things that can damage
    > their lenses; for them, UV filters are a bad thing. For many of us,
    > though, UV filters do perform a protective role.
    > UV filters do provide an extra glass piece that can reduce contrast
    > and add glare or reflections to the image.


    I prefer the protection that a decent hood offers. I started off using the
    skylight filter but now prefer a hood. I particularly like the metal screw
    in hood on my nikkor 85/1.4 lens as this hood cannot be knocked off like a
    plastic bayonet hood, although i can't clip on the lens cap while the hood
    is on.

    cheers adrian www.boliston.co.uk
    Adrian Boliston, Nov 22, 2006
    #6
  7. Ken Lucke Guest

    In article <>, Adrian Boliston
    <> wrote:

    > "Ken Lucke" <> wrote in message
    > news:221120061118230195%...
    >
    > > From my experience and some tests reported here, it's more marketing
    > > hype. The final verdict is still out, but it seems to only dislodge a
    > > small portion of any actual dust. If dust becomes a problem, learn to
    > > clean your own sensor (be aware that this could void your warranty if
    > > discovered....

    >
    > My D70s has a "mirror lockup" mode specifically designed for sensor
    > cleaning, so I doubt it would void the warranty unless you started damaging
    > the sensor by using inappropiate cleaning gear.


    Some manufacturers _will_ void your warranty if you clean the sensor at
    all using any physical contact, or do it without using their "approved"
    products and procedures.

    A quote from http://www.cleaningdigitalcameras.com/methods.html:

    ============================
    Only Kodak, Leica and Fuji support the consumer in using the same
    method that they themselves use for cleaning the low pass filter. All
    the others manufacturers only support the non-physical contact use of a
    hand blower. If Canon, Nikon, Olympus, Pentax or Sigma, can tell that
    you have touched the low pass filter, your warranty is void. On the
    other hand, Photographic Solutions Inc., guarantees that you won't
    damage your camera, if you use their SensorSwabs and Eclipse.

    * Canon - Blower and a Kimwipe, held by tweezers. They do not like
    to use fluid but when necessary they use either 90% isopropyl alcohol
    or a 50/50 mixture of isopropyl alcohol and Windex.
    * Fuji - Photographic Solutions SensorSwabs and Eclipse
    * Kodak - Photographic Solutions SensorSwabs and Eclipse
    * Leica - Photographic Solutions SensorSwabs and Eclipse
    * Nikon - A commercial grade lens tissue wrapped around a chopstick
    style piece of wood with medical grade methanol. Several forums have
    posts where readers have been to Nikon Service outside the USA and
    reported seeing the technicians using SensorsSwabs and Eclipse.
    * Olympus - A Kimwipe held by tweezers and Olympus Proprietary
    Solution (dries quickly without streaks and is bio-degradeable).
    * Pentax - A special lint free cloth (provided from Japan) folded
    into a small square and held with a pair of tweezers as a swab
    moistened with a freon derivative.
    * Sigma - Uses a special vacuum cleaner that was provided by Japan.
    ============================

    In support of that data, they say:
    ============================
    (Q) Where did you get the information used to developed this site?
    (A) Over 150 sources were researched and it still isn't complete.

    * Visited over 100 web sites
    * Visited 14 different online sensor cleaning tutorials
    * Visited over 20 Forums
    * Talked with all 7 DSLR Manufacturer's repair departments
    * Talked to many professional Camera Repairmen who clean multiple
    brands of cameras on a daily basis
    * Last but not least, our first hand knowledge on the subject
    ============================
    Ken Lucke, Nov 22, 2006
    #7
  8. Bill Hilton Guest

    > Ken Lucke wrote:
    >
    > Some manufacturers _will_ void your warranty if you clean the sensor at
    > all using any physical contact ...
    >
    > A quote from http://www.cleaningdigitalcameras.com/methods.html:
    >
    > ============================
    > ... If Canon, Nikon, Olympus, Pentax or Sigma, can tell that
    > you have touched the low pass filter, your warranty is void.


    This is simply not true ... if you DAMAGE the sensor you are on your
    own but it's nonsense to claim your warranty is void "if you clean the
    sensor at all using any physical contact".

    I'm certain of this because I recently received a Canon camera with
    dust on the sensor and after using the Sensor Brush and then Eclipse
    with Pec Pads there was still one blob that would not come clean. It
    seemed obvious to me that it was under the filter.

    I returned the camera with a photo of a screen dump showing the problem
    and explaining that I had tried cleaning it with the brush and with Pec
    Pads (which is full-body "physical contact") and asked them to either
    fix it and return it or send me a new camera.

    Far from voiding my warranty, they sent me a new camera as a
    replacement.

    Bill
    Bill Hilton, Nov 23, 2006
    #8
  9. Bill Funk Guest

    On Wed, 22 Nov 2006 21:06:46 -0000, "Adrian Boliston"
    <> wrote:

    >"Bill Funk" <> wrote in message
    >news:...
    >
    >> I use a UV filter on my 3 lenses. Not because trey filter out any UV
    >> light (most DSLRs have a UV filter over ther sensor already) but
    >> because they offer protection. (My favorite story about this is when
    >> the filter got bashed by a turkey leg at the Renn Festival; the filter
    >> wasn't damaged, but cleaning it was a mess.)
    >> Many photographers don't go places or shoot things that can damage
    >> their lenses; for them, UV filters are a bad thing. For many of us,
    >> though, UV filters do perform a protective role.
    >> UV filters do provide an extra glass piece that can reduce contrast
    >> and add glare or reflections to the image.

    >
    >I prefer the protection that a decent hood offers. I started off using the
    >skylight filter but now prefer a hood. I particularly like the metal screw
    >in hood on my nikkor 85/1.4 lens as this hood cannot be knocked off like a
    >plastic bayonet hood, although i can't clip on the lens cap while the hood
    >is on.
    >
    >cheers adrian www.boliston.co.uk
    >


    I would too, except that it makes for a much larger bag. :-(
    --
    Bill Funk
    replace "g" with "a"
    Bill Funk, Nov 23, 2006
    #9
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