New virus poses as CNN Breaking News

Discussion in 'Computer Security' started by Jay Calvert, Jan 20, 2005.

  1. Jay Calvert

    Jay Calvert Guest

    Jay Calvert, Jan 20, 2005
    #1
    1. Advertising

  2. Jay Calvert

    Moe Trin Guest

    In article <csp7t0$ucd$>, Jay Calvert wrote:

    >Virus spreads as it pretends to be from CNN Breaking News Service. It
    >even uses realtime information from CNN.com before sending it.
    >
    >http://habaneronetworks.com/viewArticle.php?ID=109


    Jay, I know you feel this is important - but could you please learn to
    MULTIPOST instead of spewing the same article individually over every
    newsgroup you can think of? Thanks.
     
    Moe Trin, Jan 20, 2005
    #2
    1. Advertising

  3. I thought he was multi-posting. Do you mean to post to several news Groups at the same time
    ?
    If that is true, I believe that is called cross-posting and that is what you want Jay to do.

    --
    Dave




    "Moe Trin" <> wrote in message

    | Jay, I know you feel this is important - but could you please learn to
    | MULTIPOST instead of spewing the same article individually over every
    | newsgroup you can think of? Thanks.
    |
     
    David H. Lipman, Jan 20, 2005
    #3
  4. Jay Calvert

    Leythos Guest

    In article <>,
    says...
    > In article <csp7t0$ucd$>, Jay Calvert wrote:
    >
    > >Virus spreads as it pretends to be from CNN Breaking News Service. It
    > >even uses realtime information from CNN.com before sending it.
    > >
    > >http://habaneronetworks.com/viewArticle.php?ID=109

    >
    > Jay, I know you feel this is important - but could you please learn to
    > MULTIPOST instead of spewing the same article individually over every
    > newsgroup you can think of? Thanks.


    Cross posting means ONE article with links in each group so that when
    you lick Mark Group Read - you won't read the same post in any other
    group (same for reading the single article).

    Multi-posting means to post the same article to multiple groups such
    that each group gets its own - non-linked - copy of the article.

    --
    --

    (Remove 999 to reply to me)
     
    Leythos, Jan 20, 2005
    #4
  5. Jay Calvert

    Moe Trin Guest

    In article <WNWHd.13261$Os6.1886@trnddc08>, David H. Lipman wrote:
    >I thought he was multi-posting. Do you mean to post to several news Groups at the same time
    >?
    >If that is true, I believe that is called cross-posting and that is what you want Jay to do.
    >

    Yeah, that's what happens when I get rather unhappy. Cross-posting is what
    he wants.
     
    Moe Trin, Jan 20, 2005
    #5
  6. Jay Calvert

    Moe Trin Guest

    In article <>,
    Leythos wrote:
    >In article <>,
    > says...
    >> In article <csp7t0$ucd$>, Jay Calvert wrote:
    >>
    >> >Virus spreads as it pretends to be from CNN Breaking News Service. It
    >> >even uses realtime information from CNN.com before sending it.
    >> >
    >> >http://habaneronetworks.com/viewArticle.php?ID=109

    >>
    >> Jay, I know you feel this is important - but could you please learn to
    >> MULTIPOST instead of spewing the same article individually over every
    >> newsgroup you can think of? Thanks.

    >
    >Cross posting means ONE article with links in each group so that when
    >you lick Mark Group Read - you won't read the same post in any other
    >group (same for reading the single article).
    >
    >Multi-posting means to post the same article to multiple groups such
    >that each group gets its own - non-linked - copy of the article.


    Yup - that's a problem I have when I get unhappy - I shoot first and
    regret it later. Ah, well.
     
    Moe Trin, Jan 21, 2005
    #6
  7. Jay Calvert wrote:

    > Virus spreads as it pretends to be from CNN Breaking News Service. It
    > even uses realtime information from CNN.com before sending it.
    >
    > http://habaneronetworks.com/viewArticle.php?ID=109



    Aside from cross posting stuff, thanks for the heads up!
     
    Michael J. Pelletier, Jan 21, 2005
    #7
  8. Jay Calvert

    Rodney Kelp Guest

    People who write viruses are no different than people who would cut your
    brake line or put arsenic in your coffee. The punishment should be the same.


    "Jay Calvert" <> wrote in message
    news:csp7t0$ucd$...
    > Virus spreads as it pretends to be from CNN Breaking News Service. It even
    > uses realtime information from CNN.com before sending it.
    >
    > http://habaneronetworks.com/viewArticle.php?ID=109
     
    Rodney Kelp, Jan 21, 2005
    #8
  9. Jay Calvert

    Bill Unruh Guest

    "Rodney Kelp" <> writes:

    >People who write viruses are no different than people who would cut your
    >brake line or put arsenic in your coffee. The punishment should be the same.


    Sorry? Your two examples kill or make very sick. viruses on a computer do
    not, unless you are a member of the "Computers as people" league, but then
    I hope you never switch yours off. Or change its operating system, or even
    upgrade.
     
    Bill Unruh, Jan 21, 2005
    #9
  10. In article <csrcvu$f07$>, on 21 Jan 2005 17:09:18 GMT,
    (Bill Unruh) wrote:

    | "Rodney Kelp" <> writes:
    |
    | >People who write viruses are no different than people who would cut your
    | >brake line or put arsenic in your coffee. The punishment should be the same.
    |
    | Sorry? Your two examples kill or make very sick. viruses on a computer do
    | not,

    Unless it is a computer in a hospital containing essential patient records,
    or controlling an x-ray machine dosage, or a fly by wire airplane, nuclear reactor,
    chemical plant, car engine, ...

    I'm sure you can think of many other ways in which an incorrectly working computer
    can injure or kill someone.

    --
    <davidp />
    DavidPostill
     
    David Postill, Jan 21, 2005
    #10
  11. Very good points David !

    --
    Dave




    "David Postill" <> wrote in message
    news:...
    |
    | Unless it is a computer in a hospital containing essential patient records,
    | or controlling an x-ray machine dosage, or a fly by wire airplane, nuclear reactor,
    | chemical plant, car engine, ...
    |
    | I'm sure you can think of many other ways in which an incorrectly working computer
    | can injure or kill someone.
    |
    | --
    | <davidp />
    | DavidPostill
     
    David H. Lipman, Jan 21, 2005
    #11
  12. Jay Calvert

    lee Guest

    Rodney Kelp wrote:
    > People who write viruses are no different than people who would cut your
    > brake line or put arsenic in your coffee. The punishment should be the same.
    >
    >

    Rodney, there is a difference. Cutting your brakelines and putting
    poison in your coffee is intended to harm or kill you. Do you agree?

    Writing malware cannot cause harm or death to an other's person. It
    might screw your data, or hose your OS, but that act cannot cause your
    death. Unless you know something I don't.
     
    lee, Jan 21, 2005
    #12
  13. Jay Calvert

    Leythos Guest

    In article <yveId.3$>,
    says...
    > Writing malware cannot cause harm or death to an other's person. It
    > might screw your data, or hose your OS, but that act cannot cause your
    > death. Unless you know something I don't.


    Actually, with the number of personal computers in plant (factory) floor
    environments where commands for machine control are being processed at
    the PC, malware and other types could cause physical harm. For almost 20
    years I worked in the industrial sector with PLC's and computers as they
    migrated into the "plant-floor" and the only way we kept those nasty
    things out was to firewall the floor systems from the office systems and
    remove all means for common users to load/download anything.

    I saw a single word virus spread through 13 plants in less than 6 hours
    many years ago - but the plant floor network was not impacted since we
    didn't allow the front office systems or IT people access to it.

    --
    --

    (Remove 999 to reply to me)
     
    Leythos, Jan 21, 2005
    #13
  14. YES !!!

    Remember the US North East and Canada power outage in August '03. There were those that
    claimed the Lovsan/Blaster was part of the cause. While the final report refuted any links
    to an Internet worm it begs -- What if....

    --
    Dave




    "Leythos" <> wrote in message
    news:...

    | Actually, with the number of personal computers in plant (factory) floor
    | environments where commands for machine control are being processed at
    | the PC, malware and other types could cause physical harm. For almost 20
    | years I worked in the industrial sector with PLC's and computers as they
    | migrated into the "plant-floor" and the only way we kept those nasty
    | things out was to firewall the floor systems from the office systems and
    | remove all means for common users to load/download anything.
    |
    | I saw a single word virus spread through 13 plants in less than 6 hours
    | many years ago - but the plant floor network was not impacted since we
    | didn't allow the front office systems or IT people access to it.
    |
    | --
    | --
    |
    | (Remove 999 to reply to me)
     
    David H. Lipman, Jan 21, 2005
    #14
  15. Rodney Kelp wrote:

    > People who write viruses are no different than people who would cut your
    > brake line or put arsenic in your coffee. The punishment should be the
    > same.
    >
    >
    > "Jay Calvert" <> wrote in message
    > news:csp7t0$ucd$...
    >> Virus spreads as it pretends to be from CNN Breaking News Service. It
    >> even uses realtime information from CNN.com before sending it.
    >>
    >> http://habaneronetworks.com/viewArticle.php?ID=109



    What about companies that make this shitty software (not tested and rushed
    to sale)? What about holding them accountable? I blame them more than the
    people that write the virus. There is a good old saying, "locks are meant
    to keep honest people honest" Too many times Microsoft has just made it too
    damn easy...I blame Microsoft more than the people who write these
    viruses...

    True no software is perfect and without flaws but come on! No company on the
    planet has a worse record of problems. Microsoft is also one of the richest
    companies on the planet. So why don't they worry less about supporting SCO
    and fix their damn code?

    Many people will spew that stupid statement about Microsoft being hacked and
    cracked because they are the most popular Operating and applications
    company. Bullcrap! I have friends that partake in these sort of activities.
    Hackers are opportunists! They do not care about marketshare. If you give
    them a hole they will take it no matter what the OS or application is....

    Enough is enough. Microsoft need to be held accountable...

    Michael
     
    Michael J. Pelletier, Jan 22, 2005
    #15
  16. Jay Calvert

    lee Guest

    Leythos wrote:
    > In article <yveId.3$>,
    > says...
    >
    >>Writing malware cannot cause harm or death to an other's person. It
    >>might screw your data, or hose your OS, but that act cannot cause your
    >>death. Unless you know something I don't.

    >
    >
    > Actually, with the number of personal computers in plant (factory) floor
    > environments where commands for machine control are being processed at
    > the PC, malware and other types could cause physical harm. For almost 20
    > years I worked in the industrial sector with PLC's and computers as they
    > migrated into the "plant-floor" and the only way we kept those nasty
    > things out was to firewall the floor systems from the office systems and
    > remove all means for common users to load/download anything.
    >
    > I saw a single word virus spread through 13 plants in less than 6 hours
    > many years ago - but the plant floor network was not impacted since we
    > didn't allow the front office systems or IT people access to it.
    >


    Yes, I'll agree that incidental harm could come from malware infecting
    some PC in some circumstance like you describe. But, I've never seen any
    evidence that the mere act of writing malware caused another's death.
    There may be some urban legends out there.
     
    lee, Jan 22, 2005
    #16
  17. Jay Calvert

    winged Guest

    lee wrote:
    > Leythos wrote:
    >
    >> In article <yveId.3$>,
    >> says...
    >>
    >>> Writing malware cannot cause harm or death to an other's person. It
    >>> might screw your data, or hose your OS, but that act cannot cause
    >>> your death. Unless you know something I don't.

    >>
    >>
    >>
    >> Actually, with the number of personal computers in plant (factory)
    >> floor environments where commands for machine control are being
    >> processed at the PC, malware and other types could cause physical
    >> harm. For almost 20 years I worked in the industrial sector with PLC's
    >> and computers as they migrated into the "plant-floor" and the only way
    >> we kept those nasty things out was to firewall the floor systems from
    >> the office systems and remove all means for common users to
    >> load/download anything.
    >>
    >> I saw a single word virus spread through 13 plants in less than 6
    >> hours many years ago - but the plant floor network was not impacted
    >> since we didn't allow the front office systems or IT people access to it.
    >>

    >
    > Yes, I'll agree that incidental harm could come from malware infecting
    > some PC in some circumstance like you describe. But, I've never seen any
    > evidence that the mere act of writing malware caused another's death.
    > There may be some urban legends out there.

    Actually even Microsoft does not recommend using Windows for or mission
    critical applications. Its right there in the EULA.
    Winged
     
    winged, Jan 22, 2005
    #17
  18. winged wrote:

    > lee wrote:
    >> Leythos wrote:
    >>
    >>> In article <yveId.3$>,
    >>> says...
    >>>
    >>>> Writing malware cannot cause harm or death to an other's person. It
    >>>> might screw your data, or hose your OS, but that act cannot cause
    >>>> your death. Unless you know something I don't.
    >>>
    >>>
    >>>
    >>> Actually, with the number of personal computers in plant (factory)
    >>> floor environments where commands for machine control are being
    >>> processed at the PC, malware and other types could cause physical
    >>> harm. For almost 20 years I worked in the industrial sector with PLC's
    >>> and computers as they migrated into the "plant-floor" and the only way
    >>> we kept those nasty things out was to firewall the floor systems from
    >>> the office systems and remove all means for common users to
    >>> load/download anything.
    >>>
    >>> I saw a single word virus spread through 13 plants in less than 6
    >>> hours many years ago - but the plant floor network was not impacted
    >>> since we didn't allow the front office systems or IT people access to
    >>> it.
    >>>

    >>
    >> Yes, I'll agree that incidental harm could come from malware infecting
    >> some PC in some circumstance like you describe. But, I've never seen any
    >> evidence that the mere act of writing malware caused another's death.
    >> There may be some urban legends out there.

    > Actually even Microsoft does not recommend using Windows for or mission
    > critical applications. Its right there in the EULA.
    > Winged



    I believe it. They put it there so they can not be sued....shaddy bastards!
     
    Michael J. Pelletier, Jan 22, 2005
    #18
  19. Jay Calvert

    Rodney Kelp Guest

    It is a malicious act intended to cause harm and destruction to people.
    If it steal personal information it is intended to steal one's identity and
    entire life. I call that MURDER IN THE FIRST DEGREE!
    Even though you can recover somewhat it has ruined your life and upset all
    your entire family. It should be punishable by death!


    "Bill Unruh" <> wrote in message
    news:csrcvu$f07$...
    > "Rodney Kelp" <> writes:
    >
    >>People who write viruses are no different than people who would cut your
    >>brake line or put arsenic in your coffee. The punishment should be the
    >>same.

    >
    > Sorry? Your two examples kill or make very sick. viruses on a computer do
    > not, unless you are a member of the "Computers as people" league, but then
    > I hope you never switch yours off. Or change its operating system, or even
    > upgrade.
    >
    >
     
    Rodney Kelp, Jan 22, 2005
    #19
  20. Jay Calvert

    Rodney Kelp Guest

    Go ahead ASSHOLE, encourage it!

    "David Postill" <> wrote in message
    news:...
    > In article <csrcvu$f07$>, on 21 Jan 2005 17:09:18
    > GMT,
    > (Bill Unruh) wrote:
    >
    > | "Rodney Kelp" <> writes:
    > |
    > | >People who write viruses are no different than people who would cut
    > your
    > | >brake line or put arsenic in your coffee. The punishment should be the
    > same.
    > |
    > | Sorry? Your two examples kill or make very sick. viruses on a computer
    > do
    > | not,
    >
    > Unless it is a computer in a hospital containing essential patient
    > records,
    > or controlling an x-ray machine dosage, or a fly by wire airplane, nuclear
    > reactor,
    > chemical plant, car engine, ...
    >
    > I'm sure you can think of many other ways in which an incorrectly working
    > computer
    > can injure or kill someone.
    >
    > --
    > <davidp />
    > DavidPostill
     
    Rodney Kelp, Jan 22, 2005
    #20
    1. Advertising

Want to reply to this thread or ask your own question?

It takes just 2 minutes to sign up (and it's free!). Just click the sign up button to choose a username and then you can ask your own questions on the forum.
Similar Threads
  1. Mcploppy ©

    New Worm Poses as Microsoft Patch

    Mcploppy ©, Jul 17, 2003, in forum: Computer Support
    Replies:
    0
    Views:
    510
    Mcploppy ©
    Jul 17, 2003
  2. Mcploppy ©

    Trojan Horse Poses As Windows XP Update

    Mcploppy ©, Jan 11, 2004, in forum: Computer Support
    Replies:
    2
    Views:
    408
    Tergiversative
    Jan 11, 2004
  3. Au79

    TROJAN poses as plug and play patch

    Au79, Sep 3, 2005, in forum: Computer Support
    Replies:
    4
    Views:
    404
    dwåcôn
    Sep 4, 2005
  4. Au79
    Replies:
    0
    Views:
    353
  5. Raja
    Replies:
    4
    Views:
    406
    Egghead
    Jul 19, 2005
Loading...

Share This Page