New Sandybridge Processors - Overclocking

Discussion in 'Computer Information' started by John, Feb 9, 2011.

  1. John

    John Guest

    Does anyone know what the main difference is between the regular Core
    i5/Core i7 and the new Sandybridge i5/i7's? Also, I am wondering what
    you believe to be possible as far as overclocking is concerned with
    the new Sandybridge chips on air or water? I'd also be interested to
    know if any one has done anything in this group has done anything
    extreme as far as overclocking is concerned and what raw speeds you
    managed to achieve. E.g. blending your tower into a fridge or pumping/
    routing in air from your air conditioner to your tower to keep in
    extra cool?

    Cheers,
    John
     
    John, Feb 9, 2011
    #1
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  2. John

    Paul Guest

    John wrote:
    > Does anyone know what the main difference is between the regular Core
    > i5/Core i7 and the new Sandybridge i5/i7's? Also, I am wondering what
    > you believe to be possible as far as overclocking is concerned with
    > the new Sandybridge chips on air or water? I'd also be interested to
    > know if any one has done anything in this group has done anything
    > extreme as far as overclocking is concerned and what raw speeds you
    > managed to achieve. E.g. blending your tower into a fridge or pumping/
    > routing in air from your air conditioner to your tower to keep in
    > extra cool?
    >
    > Cheers,
    > John


    Sandy Bridge, gives higher performance per clock cycle, as you
    can see here.

    http://www.tomshardware.com/charts/...ng-iTunes-9.0.3.15-wav-to-aac-Audio,2422.html

    But now, we have to consider the price to be paid.

    On older processors, the FSB (front side bus, input clock to CPU) can
    be varied, as well as the multiplier (to some extent). If you bought
    a $1000 processor, the multiplier would be unlocked. If you bought
    a $200 processor, the multiplier would have a limited range. For
    example, my old Core2, has multipliers from 6x to 9x, and the
    only reason a range exists, is to implement Intel SpeedStep (EIST).

    To overclock the older processors, with their limited range multipliers,
    I would increase the input clock.

    Now, on Sandy Bridge, they have an innovation that I wondered why
    they didn't do it sooner. The CPU no longer has in input clock. The
    clock is created inside the CPU, and that is done for the express
    purpose of preventing FSB based overclocking (if the word FSB still
    has any meaning as a technical term).

    The Sandy Bridge processors are split into those with a "K" in the
    name, and those without. The ones with a "K" have an unlocked multiplier.
    That allows multiplier based overclocking. But now, you get an
    unlocked multiplier, for a lower price than is the traditional Intel
    approach.

    Since no bug-free Sandy Bridge chipsets are available at the moment
    (the P67/H67 "SATA degradation bug"), you have plenty of time to
    read this article, and see which chipset to buy.

    http://www.anandtech.com/show/4083/...-core-i7-2600k-i5-2500k-core-i3-2100-tested/6

    A quick way to get "max clock" info for Sandy Bridge, is to check
    some Newegg reviews. Click the "Feedback" tab, to read the reviews.

    http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E16819115070

    "am now over clocked to 4.6 stable and around 64 degrees at full load."

    "Runs constant 4.72 ghz solid like a swiss hand made watch.."

    "Overclocked to 4.7 Ghz in 5 minutes, waiting for my water cooling
    upgrade kit to try for more."

    I don't consider multiplier overclocking, to be much of a technical
    challenge. There will be way fewer variables, by using only a multiplier
    based method. So perhaps all the effort will go into designing better
    coolers to do it, running into "cold bugs" or whatever.

    There is a 2600K here, at 5.7GHz. Which is well short of some of the
    980X overclocks at 7GHz. And no mention here, of what cooling method.

    http://www.hwbot.org/community/subm...y._superpi_32m_core_i7_2600k_5min_50sec_460ms

    So when the fixed chipset starts to ship, and a month later, new
    motherboards roll out, you can have a crack at it.

    Paul
     
    Paul, Feb 9, 2011
    #2
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