New Open-source Camera Could Revolutionize Photography

Discussion in 'Digital Photography' started by Charles, Sep 4, 2009.

  1. Charles

    Charles Guest

    ScienceDaily (Sep. 4, 2009) — Stanford photo scientists are out to
    reinvent digital photography with the introduction of an open-source
    digital camera, which will give programmers around the world the
    chance to create software that will teach cameras new tricks.


    If the technology catches on, camera performance will be no longer be
    limited by the software that comes pre-installed by the manufacturer.
    Virtually all the features of the Stanford camera – focus, exposure,
    shutter speed, flash, etc. – are at the command of software that can
    be created by inspired programmers anywhere. “The premise of the
    project is to build a camera that is open source,” said computer
    science professor Marc Levoy.

    <more> http://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2009/09/090903163953.htm
     
    Charles, Sep 4, 2009
    #1
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  2. Charles

    Rich Guest

    Charles wrote:
    > ScienceDaily (Sep. 4, 2009) � Stanford photo scientists are out to
    > reinvent digital photography with the introduction of an open-source
    > digital camera, which will give programmers around the world the
    > chance to create software that will teach cameras new tricks.


    Take note, Nikon, Canon, everyone. The first company that goes this
    route out of your bunch will RULE the camera world like iPhone is
    taking over the phone world. Meanwhile, you keep up with the
    proprietary raw firmware, etc.
     
    Rich, Sep 4, 2009
    #2
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  3. Charles

    nospam Guest

    In article
    <>,
    Rich <> wrote:

    > Charles wrote:
    > > ScienceDaily (Sep. 4, 2009) ? Stanford photo scientists are out to
    > > reinvent digital photography with the introduction of an open-source
    > > digital camera, which will give programmers around the world the
    > > chance to create software that will teach cameras new tricks.

    >
    > Take note, Nikon, Canon, everyone. The first company that goes this
    > route out of your bunch will RULE the camera world like iPhone is
    > taking over the phone world. Meanwhile, you keep up with the
    > proprietary raw firmware, etc.


    don't count on it. it would need to use canon/nikon lenses to gain
    ground, at a minimum and most people don't give a shit about open
    source, that's why linux is a niche and mac/win is common.
     
    nospam, Sep 4, 2009
    #3
  4. Charles

    Dave Guest

    On Thu, 03 Sep 2009 23:53:47 -0700, Charles <>
    wrote:

    >ScienceDaily (Sep. 4, 2009) — Stanford photo scientists are out to
    >reinvent digital photography with the introduction of an open-source
    >digital camera, which will give programmers around the world the
    >chance to create software that will teach cameras new tricks.
    >
    >
    >If the technology catches on, camera performance will be no longer be
    >limited by the software that comes pre-installed by the manufacturer.
    >Virtually all the features of the Stanford camera – focus, exposure,
    >shutter speed, flash, etc. – are at the command of software that can
    >be created by inspired programmers anywhere. “The premise of the
    >project is to build a camera that is open source,” said computer
    >science professor Marc Levoy.
    >
    ><more> http://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2009/09/090903163953.htm


    I fail to understand why this is some big innovation or amazing concept.
    CHDK http://chdk.wikia.com/wiki/Main_Page has been around for 3 years now
    (since 2006) and is applicable to 46+ different, readily available, and
    inexpensive cameras. Any decent programmer can rewrite open-source CHDK to
    do nearly anything they want a camera to do. Plus with its uBASIC and LUA
    scripting capability the end user can then also program their camera do
    anything they want, by using whatever new features have been programmed
    into the CHDK base. Where have all these "intelligent" Stanford
    photo-scientists(?*) been studying and living? Under their respective
    gneiss, breccia, and chert? Don't anyone notify Stanford administration
    about CHDK, or these photo-scientist(?*) jokers will lose their tenure and
    funding.


    * Just what the **** is a "photo-scientist"? Anyone who intently studies
    photos? Quick, tell your weird Uncle Remus with his beloved porn collection
    that he's now a reputable "photo-scientist".

    I suspect this whole Stanford thing is just a badly done troll. It wouldn't
    be the first time that some news-service was trolled à-la-internet.
     
    Dave, Sep 4, 2009
    #4
  5. Charles

    SMS Guest

    Charles wrote:
    > ScienceDaily (Sep. 4, 2009) — Stanford photo scientists are out to
    > reinvent digital photography with the introduction of an open-source
    > digital camera, which will give programmers around the world the
    > chance to create software that will teach cameras new tricks.
    >
    >
    > If the technology catches on, camera performance will be no longer be
    > limited by the software that comes pre-installed by the manufacturer.
    > Virtually all the features of the Stanford camera – focus, exposure,
    > shutter speed, flash, etc. – are at the command of software that can
    > be created by inspired programmers anywhere. “The premise of the
    > project is to build a camera that is open source,” said computer
    > science professor Marc Levoy.


    That's great news for Linux fans. That camera will be as successful as
    Linux on the desktop, or non-iPod music players.
     
    SMS, Sep 4, 2009
    #5
  6. Charles

    Ed Flanders Guest

    On Fri, 04 Sep 2009 05:50:25 -0700, SMS <> wrote:

    >Charles wrote:
    >> ScienceDaily (Sep. 4, 2009) — Stanford photo scientists are out to
    >> reinvent digital photography with the introduction of an open-source
    >> digital camera, which will give programmers around the world the
    >> chance to create software that will teach cameras new tricks.
    >>
    >>
    >> If the technology catches on, camera performance will be no longer be
    >> limited by the software that comes pre-installed by the manufacturer.
    >> Virtually all the features of the Stanford camera – focus, exposure,
    >> shutter speed, flash, etc. – are at the command of software that can
    >> be created by inspired programmers anywhere. “The premise of the
    >> project is to build a camera that is open source,” said computer
    >> science professor Marc Levoy.

    >
    >That's great news for Linux fans. That camera will be as successful as
    >Linux on the desktop, or non-iPod music players.


    You mean all the MP3 players supported by open-source RockBox?

    http://build.rockbox.org/

    I only buy MP3 players now if they are supported by RockBox, none of which
    I own are iBrands. Under RockBox control, except for screen size displays,
    they all are capable of performing and doing all RockBox functions
    identically, no matter the brand. Play videos, games, timers, calendars,
    dictionary, slide-shows, utilities, file editing, screen themes, MIDI
    player, etc., etc., etc. My only criteria for MP3 player purchase now is
    size and price-point within those supported by RockBox.

    For an overview of main features:
    http://www.rockbox.org/twiki/bin/view/Main/FeatureComparison
    That page sorely needs updating, nearly all the "no" entries for all player
    platforms have been turned to "yes" in the last year's releases. Very
    deceiving the way it is now. I use Sansa platform players, all of those
    "no"s should be changed to "yes"s on that page. With even more than that
    added.


    Go crawl back under your collapsing rotted-wood bridge. We'll throw down a
    dead and bloated goat if we ever want to hear from you.
     
    Ed Flanders, Sep 4, 2009
    #6
  7. Charles

    Ed Flanders Guest


    >For an overview of main features:
    >http://www.rockbox.org/twiki/bin/view/Main/FeatureComparison


    <strike>
    That page sorely needs updating, nearly all the "no" entries for all
    player platforms have been turned to "yes" in the last year's releases.
    Very deceiving the way it is now. I use Sansa platform players, all of
    those "no"s should be changed to "yes"s on that page. With even
    more than that added.
    </strike>


    Whups, I glanced at those charts wrong, they're comparing RockBox to
    original MP3-player's firmwares. D'oH!
     
    Ed Flanders, Sep 4, 2009
    #7
  8. Charles

    No One Guest

    "Neil Ellwood" <> wrote in message
    news:...
    > On Thu, 03 Sep 2009 23:53:47 -0700, Charles wrote:
    >
    >> ScienceDaily (Sep. 4, 2009) — Stanford photo scientists are out to
    >> reinvent digital photography with the introduction of an open-source
    >> digital camera, which will give programmers around the world the chance
    >> to create software that will teach cameras new tricks.
    >>
    >>
    >> If the technology catches on, camera performance will be no longer be
    >> limited by the software that comes pre-installed by the manufacturer.
    >> Virtually all the features of the Stanford camera – focus, exposure,
    >> shutter speed, flash, etc. – are at the command of software that can be
    >> created by inspired programmers anywhere. “The premise of the project is
    >> to build a camera that is open source,” said computer science professor
    >> Marc Levoy.
    >>
    >> <more> http://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2009/09/090903163953.htm

    >
    >
    > Surgeons will also have much more practice at hernia reduction.
    >

    Gitzo has already thought of that camera...

    http://tinypic.com/r/neg4tv/3

    The groups next project is a IS 10~500mm f:1.4 lens to go on the camera. The
    FAA have banned them for developing a flash for the system.
     
    No One, Sep 4, 2009
    #8
  9. Charles

    Chris H Guest

    In message <
    s.com>, Rich <> writes
    >
    >
    >Charles wrote:
    >> ScienceDaily (Sep. 4, 2009) 0 >> reinvent digital photography with the introduction of an open-source
    >> digital camera, which will give programmers around the world the
    >> chance to create software that will teach cameras new tricks.

    >
    >Take note, Nikon, Canon, everyone. The first company that goes this
    >route out of your bunch will RULE the camera world


    Not a chance. It will rule the small world of geeks, like Lunix does.
    99% of the world still uses the Great Satan (Windows)

    All the professionals want to USE the camera not program it.
    All the masses want AUTOMATIC P&S
    Most to the semi-pros don't have the expertise
    Most of the ammeters don't have the expertise

    so haw big a market does that leave? Bearing in mind open-source == free
    or very low cost to most people

    > like iPhone is
    >taking over the phone world. Meanwhile, you keep up with the
    >proprietary raw firmware, etc.



    The iPhone has closed and proprietary SW in it.

    --
    \/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\
    \/\/\/\/\ Chris Hills Staffs England /\/\/\/\/
    \/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/
     
    Chris H, Sep 4, 2009
    #9
  10. Charles

    Ray Fischer Guest

    Rich <> wrote:
    >Charles wrote:
    >> ScienceDaily (Sep. 4, 2009) � Stanford photo scientists are out to
    >> reinvent digital photography with the introduction of an open-source
    >> digital camera, which will give programmers around the world the
    >> chance to create software that will teach cameras new tricks.

    >
    >Take note, Nikon, Canon, everyone. The first company that goes this
    >route out of your bunch will RULE the camera world like iPhone is
    >taking over the phone world.


    Because things like sensors, shutters, lenses, and optics really
    aren't that important.

    You're still an idiot.

    --
    Ray Fischer
     
    Ray Fischer, Sep 5, 2009
    #10
  11. Charles

    Doug Jewell Guest

    Chris H wrote:
    > In message <
    > s.com>, Rich <> writes
    >>
    >> Charles wrote:
    >>> ScienceDaily (Sep. 4, 2009) 0 >> reinvent digital photography with the introduction of an open-source
    >>> digital camera, which will give programmers around the world the
    >>> chance to create software that will teach cameras new tricks.

    >> Take note, Nikon, Canon, everyone. The first company that goes this
    >> route out of your bunch will RULE the camera world

    >
    > Not a chance. It will rule the small world of geeks, like Lunix does.
    > 99% of the world still uses the Great Satan (Windows)

    Only if you count desktop PC's. A very high percentage of
    internet servers are Linux based, and there is a very high
    chance that you own one or more devices that use embedded
    Linux - eg some GPS units, some broadband routers & modems,
    photo viewers etc.
    >
    > All the professionals want to USE the camera not program it.
    > All the masses want AUTOMATIC P&S
    > Most to the semi-pros don't have the expertise
    > Most of the ammeters don't have the expertise

    It is not likely to be the users who would be the ones
    reprogamming the device. More like specialist developers,
    who will then release the device to the public. We may see
    things like the rebadged sanyo's that almost every company
    released to the public under the guise of their brand(Kodak,
    Nikon, Pentax, Olympus, and probably a few more I've left
    out). But probably more likely I see the device would be
    used in specialist applications, where the developer can
    option and reprogram the imager to suit the application. Eg
    dental and medical imaging. Previously they have had to
    shoe-horn existing designs onto their equipment, work around
    limitations, and often had to redesign their equipment when
    a new model was released.
    >
    > so haw big a market does that leave? Bearing in mind open-source == free
    > or very low cost to most people

    I doubt very much that there'll be many of these on the mass
    market, unless 1 or more of the big manufacturers decide to
    use it as a base of a camera. But indeed I am quite sure
    that they will be around and will be an important player in
    the world of imaging - but not mass market photography.
    >




    --
    What is the difference between a duck?
     
    Doug Jewell, Sep 6, 2009
    #11
  12. Charles

    Chris H Guest

    In message <4aa373ed$0$27579$5a62ac22@per-qv1-newsreader-
    01.iinet.net.au>, Doug Jewell <> writes
    >Chris H wrote:
    >> In message <
    >> s.com>, Rich <> writes
    >>>
    >>> Charles wrote:
    >>>> ScienceDaily (Sep. 4, 2009) 0 >> reinvent digital photography with
    >>>>the introduction of an open-source
    >>>> digital camera, which will give programmers around the world the
    >>>> chance to create software that will teach cameras new tricks.
    >>> Take note, Nikon, Canon, everyone. The first company that goes this
    >>> route out of your bunch will RULE the camera world

    >> Not a chance. It will rule the small world of geeks, like Lunix
    >>does.
    >> 99% of the world still uses the Great Satan (Windows)

    >Only if you count desktop PC's. A very high percentage of internet
    >servers are Linux based, and there is a very high chance that you own
    >one or more devices that use embedded Linux - eg some GPS units, some
    >broadband routers & modems, photo viewers etc.


    So servers are going to use open source cameras?

    >> All the professionals want to USE the camera not program it.
    >> All the masses want AUTOMATIC P&S
    >> Most to the semi-pros don't have the expertise
    >> Most of the ammeters don't have the expertise

    >It is not likely to be the users who would be the ones reprogamming the
    >device. More like specialist developers, who will then release the
    >device to the public.


    Realy...

    > We may see things like the rebadged sanyo's that almost every company
    >released to the public under the guise of their brand(Kodak, Nikon,
    >Pentax, Olympus, and probably a few more I've left out).


    OK but they won't release the source. There are people who provide OEM
    kits of HW and SW to many players now. The only thing is the SW part is
    not Open source. You get the source and can modify it, rebadge it and
    ship.

    >But probably more likely I see the device would be used in specialist
    >applications, where the developer can option and reprogram the imager
    >to suit the application. Eg dental and medical imaging.


    That happens now. The people who do it are Kodak, Nikon, Pentax and
    Olympus.....

    > Previously they have had to shoe-horn existing designs onto their
    >equipment, work around limitations,


    What limitations? You are clearly not in this market. The SW/HW
    currently available for the low end OEM market does more than most need
    it to.

    The specialised stuff for the high end market is developed in close
    relationships to the camera manufacturer. There is a lot of IP involved
    on both sides and none of it will ever be open source.

    >> so haw big a market does that leave? Bearing in mind open-source ==
    >>free
    >> or very low cost to most people

    >I doubt very much that there'll be many of these on the mass market,


    I agree.

    >unless 1 or more of the big manufacturers decide to use it as a base of
    >a camera.


    Not likely. Well they do that already at the P&S end but neither the HW
    or SW is open source.

    > But indeed I am quite sure that they will be around and will be an
    >important player in the world of imaging - but not mass market
    >photography.


    I am not.

    --
    \/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\
    \/\/\/\/\ Chris Hills Staffs England /\/\/\/\/
    \/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/
     
    Chris H, Sep 6, 2009
    #12
  13. Charles

    Paul Furman Guest

    Charles wrote:
    > ScienceDaily (Sep. 4, 2009) — Stanford photo scientists are out to
    > reinvent digital photography with the introduction of an open-source
    > digital camera, which will give programmers around the world the
    > chance to create software that will teach cameras new tricks.
    >
    > <more> http://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2009/09/090903163953.htm


    Here's a little blurb the researchers did:
    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Psi_njPBryE

    I like the idea of being able to add iphone-like apps. That's where most
    of the features they are talking about will actually become popular. It
    is flaky of them not to acknowledge existing similar projects though,
    like chdk.
    Hmm, more info:

    http://blogs.zdnet.com/open-source/?p=4768
    "...because the new camera is based on a Nokia N95 smartphone, whose
    software is licensed by the open source Symbian Foundation, it can
    become a lot more."

    http://graphics.stanford.edu/projects/camera-2.0/
    "Despite these encouraging trends, there are computational photography
    experiments that simply cannot be implemented on today's cell phones.
    either because the cameras' sensor or optics aren't good enough, the
    computing resources aren't powerful enough, or the APIs connecting the
    camera to the computing are too restrictive. We are therefore building
    an open-source camera platform that runs Linux, is fully programmable
    (including its digital signal processor) and connected to the Internet,
    and accommodates SLR lenses and SLR-quality sensors. Our current
    prototype (3rd and 4th images above) is constructed from off-the-shelf
    parts, in some cases borrowed from dead cameras. It's also ugly - hence
    the name. Our goal is to distribute this platform at minimal cost to
    computational photography researchers and courses worldwide."

    --
    Paul Furman
    www.edgehill.net
    www.baynatives.com

    all google groups messages filtered due to spam
     
    Paul Furman, Sep 30, 2009
    #13
  14. Charles

    Paul Furman Guest

    Paul Furman wrote:
    > Charles wrote:
    >> ScienceDaily (Sep. 4, 2009) — Stanford photo scientists are out to
    >> reinvent digital photography with the introduction of an open-source
    >> digital camera, which will give programmers around the world the
    >> chance to create software that will teach cameras new tricks.
    >>
    >> <more> http://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2009/09/090903163953.htm

    >
    > Here's a little blurb the researchers did:
    > http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Psi_njPBryE
    >
    > I like the idea of being able to add iphone-like apps.


    Some might say this is silly but here's one idea for a camera app that
    could help with composition:
    http://world-market-portraits.blogspot.com/2008/04/posterize-in-photoshop.html
    "When working from a life model, the artist needs to squint to loose
    sight of all detail and determine the areas that are light, medium or dark"

    That suggests to me a 'squint-mode' for which you could assign a button
    for easy access. In an ideal world, I'd have that button lift the DSLR
    mirror to reveal an alternate electronic viewfinder (EVF). Once focus is
    set, I might choose to shoot in the most crude posterized b&w view to
    keep aware of the big picture. This could be a very powerful tool.

    > That's where most of the features they are talking about will actually
    > become popular. It is flaky of them not to acknowledge existing
    > similar projects though, like chdk.
    > Hmm, more info:
    >
    > http://blogs.zdnet.com/open-source/?p=4768
    > "...because the new camera is based on a Nokia N95 smartphone, whose
    > software is licensed by the open source Symbian Foundation, it can
    > become a lot more."
    >
    > http://graphics.stanford.edu/projects/camera-2.0/
    > "Despite these encouraging trends, there are computational photography
    > experiments that simply cannot be implemented on today's cell phones.
    > either because the cameras' sensor or optics aren't good enough, the
    > computing resources aren't powerful enough, or the APIs connecting the
    > camera to the computing are too restrictive. We are therefore building
    > an open-source camera platform that runs Linux, is fully programmable
    > (including its digital signal processor) and connected to the
    > Internet, and accommodates SLR lenses and SLR-quality sensors. Our
    > current prototype (3rd and 4th images above) is constructed from
    > off-the-shelf parts, in some cases borrowed from dead cameras. It's
    > also ugly - hence the name. Our goal is to distribute this platform at
    > minimal cost to computational photography researchers and courses
    > worldwide."
    >



    --
    Paul Furman
    www.edgehill.net
    www.baynatives.com

    all google groups messages filtered due to spam
     
    Paul Furman, Oct 2, 2009
    #14
  15. Charles

    Catch Up Guest

    On Thu, 01 Oct 2009 21:39:57 -0700, Paul Furman <>
    wrote:

    >
    >Some might say this is silly but here's one idea for a camera app that
    >could help with composition:
    >http://world-market-portraits.blogspot.com/2008/04/posterize-in-photoshop.html
    >"When working from a life model, the artist needs to squint to loose
    >sight of all detail and determine the areas that are light, medium or dark"
    >
    >That suggests to me a 'squint-mode' for which you could assign a button
    >for easy access. In an ideal world, I'd have that button lift the DSLR
    >mirror to reveal an alternate electronic viewfinder (EVF). Once focus is
    >set, I might choose to shoot in the most crude posterized b&w view to
    >keep aware of the big picture. This could be a very powerful tool.


    I already designed a stair-step curve for my CHDK-supported P&S camera that
    does exactly that using the "Custom Curves" feature of CHDK, by using
    CHDK's custom-curves editor. I wish you people would catch up. You're so
    sadly and ignorantly 3 years behind the times of what's already been done
    and is readily available to millions.

    What ignorant morons they be.
     
    Catch Up, Oct 2, 2009
    #15
  16. Charles

    Walter Banks Guest

    Paul Furman wrote:

    > Charles wrote:
    > > ScienceDaily (Sep. 4, 2009) — Stanford photo scientists are out to
    > > reinvent digital photography with the introduction of an open-source
    > > digital camera, which will give programmers around the world the
    > > chance to create software that will teach cameras new tricks.
    > >
    > > <more> http://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2009/09/090903163953.htm

    >
    > Here's a little blurb the researchers did:
    > http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Psi_njPBryE
    >
    > I like the idea of being able to add iphone-like apps.
    >
    >
    > http://blogs.zdnet.com/open-source/?p=4768
    >
    >
    > http://graphics.stanford.edu/projects/camera-2.0/
    >
    >


    There is a case for many digital cameras to have some form of
    app interface that could be scripted or programmed even if the
    camera had a protective software layer.

    The obvious interface being programs transferred to the camera
    on sd and compact flash already being used for image storage.
    A personal computer hosted development environment has the
    potential to open a new facet to photography.

    A far less aggressive form would also be useful by just bringing
    out the camera's individual functionality and programming from
    menu's in a camera specific programming language.

    This has been happening with many of the Canon point and
    shoot camera's with the CHDK project.
    http://chdk.wikia.com/wiki/CHDK
    The CHDK project has matured quite a bit from just a camera
    hack to a more organized feature and programs

    Recently 3 MIT students implemented a low cost high altitude
    photography project by using CHDK to program a Canon A470
    to take periodic pictures.
    http://space.1337arts.com/

    Canon (and I assume Nikon as well) have a third party developer
    program. The real problem when my company looked into it was it
    opened the doors for applications developed for a specific industry,
    (astronomy for example) it still made the development costs for
    applications very high.

    An app interface that protected the basic camera software from
    inadvertent alteration to protect the camera would allow creative use
    of software with very little down side. This coupled with appropriate
    support tools would have a lot going for it.

    I live in a dark sky area and my astronomer friends would love to be
    able to shoot programmed sequences. Multi frame stacked shots
    (like some of the Nikon low light current software)

    The mechanics and optics of an open source camera keep the
    project at little more than a high priced toy. Software support for
    a well developed platform would truly open some adventurous
    photographic door.

    Walter Banks
     
    Walter Banks, Oct 2, 2009
    #16
  17. Walter Banks <> wrote:
    >There is a case for many digital cameras to have some form of
    >app interface that could be scripted or programmed even if the
    >camera had a protective software layer.
    >
    >The obvious interface being programs transferred to the camera
    >on sd and compact flash already being used for image storage.
    >A personal computer hosted development environment has the
    >potential to open a new facet to photography.


    The first step and sometimes more useful would be a remote control
    interface of all funtions via the USB instead of proprietary remote
    controls.

    jue
     
    Jürgen Exner, Oct 2, 2009
    #17
  18. Charles

    Walter Banks Guest

    "Jürgen Exner" wrote:

    > Walter Banks <> wrote:
    > >There is a case for many digital cameras to have some form of
    > >app interface that could be scripted or programmed even if the
    > >camera had a protective software layer.
    > >
    > >The obvious interface being programs transferred to the camera
    > >on sd and compact flash already being used for image storage.
    > >A personal computer hosted development environment has the
    > >potential to open a new facet to photography.

    >
    > The first step and sometimes more useful would be a remote control
    > interface of all funtions via the USB instead of proprietary remote
    > controls.


    The real problem is the nature of USB host side app. A
    generic camera protocol (like usb memory drives) would open
    a lot of doors for creative use of a camera.

    There is third party usb host support but unlike image standards
    there hasn't been much effort to standardize controls.

    Wireless controls are another approach through bluetooth or
    wireless networks. There are a lot more tools to communicate
    through wireless networks than create host usb support. Something
    like a blackberry could then be used as a remote. At this point
    there are a limited number of cameras with wireless network
    support.

    Walter Banks
     
    Walter Banks, Oct 2, 2009
    #18
  19. Charles

    Ofnuts Guest

    Jürgen Exner wrote:

    >
    > The first step and sometimes more useful would be a remote control
    > interface of all funtions via the USB instead of proprietary remote
    > controls.
    >


    My Canon DSLR can be fully remotely controlled by USB except the zooming
    on zoom lens (which isn't powered). This is used by the software
    provided as standard with the camera. There used to be a software
    development kit for it, too (but I don't know what its current status is).

    --
    Bertrand
     
    Ofnuts, Oct 2, 2009
    #19
  20. Charles

    Catch Up Guest

    On Fri, 02 Oct 2009 09:06:23 -0700, Jürgen Exner <>
    wrote:

    >Walter Banks <> wrote:
    >>There is a case for many digital cameras to have some form of
    >>app interface that could be scripted or programmed even if the
    >>camera had a protective software layer.
    >>
    >>The obvious interface being programs transferred to the camera
    >>on sd and compact flash already being used for image storage.
    >>A personal computer hosted development environment has the
    >>potential to open a new facet to photography.

    >
    >The first step and sometimes more useful would be a remote control
    >interface of all funtions via the USB instead of proprietary remote
    >controls.
    >
    >jue


    Any of the Canon Powershot cameras that are supported by Cam4You Remote
    <http://alkenius.no-ip.org/Cam4you_remote/index.html> already do this.
    Zoom, focus, white-balance settings, video modes, etc. If that camera is
    also supported by CHDK then the sky's the limit. Although the USB-Remote
    feature of CHDK is limited (at this time) to just the duration of 5v
    pulses, many people have written scripts to control zooming, focusing, EV
    compensation, etc., all controlled just by the duration of how long they
    keep their USB-remote cable button pressed.
     
    Catch Up, Oct 3, 2009
    #20
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