new motherboard advice

Discussion in 'NZ Computing' started by -[Myth]-, May 19, 2004.

  1. -[Myth]-

    -[Myth]- Guest

    I am planning to upgrade my current system, basically get a new everything,
    except the optical drives, and I am having trouble selecting a motherboard.
    I can go for either a 64 bit athlon 64 motherboard, or a socket A and keep
    my current althlon xp 2200+. This would certainly be the cheaper option,
    but from what i can see AMD have given up on 32-bit, and all their newer
    models are 64s. I use the PC mainly for games, and will need [decent]
    onboard sound and LAN.
    Any advice appreciated

    TIA
    -[Myth]-, May 19, 2004
    #1
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  2. -[Myth]-

    EMB Guest

    In news:10rs8y1ku8m5w$,
    -[Myth]- <> expelled:
    > I am planning to upgrade my current system, basically get a new
    > everything, except the optical drives, and I am having trouble
    > selecting a motherboard. I can go for either a 64 bit athlon 64
    > motherboard, or a socket A and keep my current althlon xp 2200+.
    > This would certainly be the cheaper option, but from what i can see
    > AMD have given up on 32-bit, and all their newer models are 64s. I
    > use the PC mainly for games, and will need [decent] onboard sound and
    > LAN.


    Athlon64 is still pretty much bleeding edge technology and the price
    reflects this. I'd suggest you ignore the '64 for a year or so until it
    becomes better value, move to an SATA disk and give the current CPU some
    decent cooling and a bit of an overclock (faster FSB) if performance is
    *really* vital.


    --
    EMB
    change two to number to reply
    EMB, May 19, 2004
    #2
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  3. -[Myth]-

    steve Guest

    -[Myth]- wrote:
    > I am planning to upgrade my current system, basically get a new everything,
    > except the optical drives, and I am having trouble selecting a motherboard.
    > I can go for either a 64 bit athlon 64 motherboard, or a socket A and keep
    > my current althlon xp 2200+. This would certainly be the cheaper option,
    > but from what i can see AMD have given up on 32-bit, and all their newer
    > models are 64s. I use the PC mainly for games, and will need [decent]
    > onboard sound and LAN.
    > Any advice appreciated
    >
    > TIA


    Get a board that supports your current CPU...and the latest Sockat A
    models.

    The 64-bit ones are still clocking relatively slow by comparison and
    probably won't be worth buying for a year or so.....

    A Barton 2800+ or 3200+ would be a nice upgrade as they have a much
    larger (512k) cache than the 2200+ (256k).

    That extra cache makes a big difference.
    steve, May 19, 2004
    #3
  4. -[Myth]-

    Bruce Flyger Guest

    -[Myth]- wrote:
    > I am planning to upgrade my current system, basically get a new everything,
    > except the optical drives, and I am having trouble selecting a motherboard.
    > I can go for either a 64 bit athlon 64 motherboard, or a socket A and keep
    > my current althlon xp 2200+. This would certainly be the cheaper option,
    > but from what i can see AMD have given up on 32-bit, and all their newer
    > models are 64s. I use the PC mainly for games, and will need [decent]
    > onboard sound and LAN.
    > Any advice appreciated
    >
    > TIA

    My top 3 Motherboard recommendations are:

    Gigabyte GA-7NNXP
    Abit NF7-S
    DFI Lanparty NFII

    All 3 of these have onboard network adapters and very good onboard
    sound. They feature the Nvidia MCP-T Southbridge chip which offers
    hardware sound rivalling the performance of the Audigy series of soundcards.
    Don't confuse the MCP-T with the MCP. Although the MCP chip also
    delivers onboard sound, it is not hardware based and does tax your CPU
    during games.
    Bruce Flyger, May 19, 2004
    #4
  5. -[Myth]-

    ~misfit~ Guest

    Bruce Flyger wrote:
    > -[Myth]- wrote:
    >> I am planning to upgrade my current system, basically get a new
    >> everything, except the optical drives, and I am having trouble
    >> selecting a motherboard. I can go for either a 64 bit athlon 64
    >> motherboard, or a socket A and keep my current althlon xp 2200+.
    >> This would certainly be the cheaper option, but from what i can see
    >> AMD have given up on 32-bit, and all their newer models are 64s. I
    >> use the PC mainly for games, and will need [decent] onboard sound
    >> and LAN.
    >> Any advice appreciated
    >>
    >> TIA

    > My top 3 Motherboard recommendations are:
    >
    > Gigabyte GA-7NNXP
    > Abit NF7-S
    > DFI Lanparty NFII
    >
    > All 3 of these have onboard network adapters and very good onboard
    > sound. They feature the Nvidia MCP-T Southbridge chip which offers
    > hardware sound rivalling the performance of the Audigy series of
    > soundcards. Don't confuse the MCP-T with the MCP. Although the MCP
    > chip also
    > delivers onboard sound, it is not hardware based and does tax your CPU
    > during games.


    Yep, all good boards. I have a Soltel SL-75FRN2-L myself. It doesn't have
    the MCP-T southbridge but I'm happy with the sound and the price was
    certainly good ($150). If it taxes my CPU it's not so's you'd notice. I get
    good 3DMark scores for my system specs.

    What model is your 2200+? If it's a Tbred B then you should be able to get
    some good performance out of it with a good, nForce2 Ultra 400 mobo. My
    1800+ is running on a 200FSB with a 10.5 multi giving me 2.1Ghz or around
    XP2600+ performance. My memory is also at 200Mhz, dual channel. This old CPU
    is going damn good. I liked it when I first got it, running at stock
    (1.6Ghz). Once I got it in this board though it really took off. It'll do me
    for a while yet.
    --
    ~misfit~
    ~misfit~, May 19, 2004
    #5
  6. > Gigabyte GA-7NNXP
    > Abit NF7-S
    > DFI Lanparty NFII
    >
    > All 3 of these have onboard network adapters and very good onboard
    > sound. They feature the Nvidia MCP-T Southbridge chip which offers
    > hardware sound rivalling the performance of the Audigy series of

    soundcards.
    > Don't confuse the MCP-T with the MCP. Although the MCP chip also
    > delivers onboard sound, it is not hardware based and does tax your CPU
    > during games.


    Well the main bonus of soundstorm is it's ability to encode surround sound 4
    channel and 5.1 channel games in to 5.1 dolby digital and send that signal
    out an optical link. You need a home theatre system to take advantage of it,
    or a flash set of computer speakers that can decode dolby digital. A realtek
    chip is used for analogue out, so it's hardly any better than your average
    onboard audio unless u can use the optical link. Although i'm not sure of
    this part, i think the only thing soundstorm can do without taxing the CPU
    is that dolby digital encoding, for other tasks like hardware accelerated
    sound in games etc, it won't be able to match an audigy in terms of CPU
    usage

    Steve
    Stephen Williams, May 19, 2004
    #6
  7. -[Myth]-

    Bruce Flyger Guest

    Stephen Williams wrote:
    >>Gigabyte GA-7NNXP
    >>Abit NF7-S
    >>DFI Lanparty NFII
    >>
    >>All 3 of these have onboard network adapters and very good onboard
    >>sound. They feature the Nvidia MCP-T Southbridge chip which offers
    >>hardware sound rivalling the performance of the Audigy series of

    >
    > soundcards.
    >
    >>Don't confuse the MCP-T with the MCP. Although the MCP chip also
    >>delivers onboard sound, it is not hardware based and does tax your CPU
    >>during games.

    >
    >
    > Well the main bonus of soundstorm is it's ability to encode surround sound 4
    > channel and 5.1 channel games in to 5.1 dolby digital and send that signal
    > out an optical link. You need a home theatre system to take advantage of it,
    > or a flash set of computer speakers that can decode dolby digital. A realtek
    > chip is used for analogue out, so it's hardly any better than your average
    > onboard audio unless u can use the optical link. Although i'm not sure of
    > this part, i think the only thing soundstorm can do without taxing the CPU
    > is that dolby digital encoding, for other tasks like hardware accelerated
    > sound in games etc, it won't be able to match an audigy in terms of CPU
    > usage
    >
    > Steve
    >
    >

    Analogue sound is still proccesed using the MCP-T chip, the realtek chip
    simply converts the processed sound and passes it though to analogue
    speakers.
    I have played many games using normal onboard sound and they really do
    tax the system heavily. Repeated slow downs and an all round drop in
    framerate is evident. The MCP-T however allows you to play games, in
    analogue, with all the bells and whistle, EAX etc with no framerate
    drops or stutters at all.

    There is a saying among the nforce2 forums that when you buy a
    motherboard featuring MCP-T soundstorm you are actually paying all that
    money for a great soundcard with a free motherboard thrown in.
    Bruce Flyger, May 19, 2004
    #7
  8. -[Myth]-

    -[Myth]- Guest

    On Thu, 20 May 2004 01:23:40 +1200, Bruce Flyger wrote:

    > Stephen Williams wrote:
    >>>Gigabyte GA-7NNXP
    >>>Abit NF7-S
    >>>DFI Lanparty NFII
    >>>
    >>>All 3 of these have onboard network adapters and very good onboard
    >>>sound. They feature the Nvidia MCP-T Southbridge chip which offers
    >>>hardware sound rivalling the performance of the Audigy series of

    >>
    >> soundcards.
    >>
    >>>Don't confuse the MCP-T with the MCP. Although the MCP chip also
    >>>delivers onboard sound, it is not hardware based and does tax your CPU
    >>>during games.

    >>
    >>
    >> Well the main bonus of soundstorm is it's ability to encode surround sound 4
    >> channel and 5.1 channel games in to 5.1 dolby digital and send that signal
    >> out an optical link. You need a home theatre system to take advantage of it,
    >> or a flash set of computer speakers that can decode dolby digital. A realtek
    >> chip is used for analogue out, so it's hardly any better than your average
    >> onboard audio unless u can use the optical link. Although i'm not sure of
    >> this part, i think the only thing soundstorm can do without taxing the CPU
    >> is that dolby digital encoding, for other tasks like hardware accelerated
    >> sound in games etc, it won't be able to match an audigy in terms of CPU
    >> usage
    >>
    >> Steve
    >>
    >>

    > Analogue sound is still proccesed using the MCP-T chip, the realtek chip
    > simply converts the processed sound and passes it though to analogue
    > speakers.
    > I have played many games using normal onboard sound and they really do
    > tax the system heavily. Repeated slow downs and an all round drop in
    > framerate is evident. The MCP-T however allows you to play games, in
    > analogue, with all the bells and whistle, EAX etc with no framerate
    > drops or stutters at all.
    >
    > There is a saying among the nforce2 forums that when you buy a
    > motherboard featuring MCP-T soundstorm you are actually paying all that
    > money for a great soundcard with a free motherboard thrown in.


    The Abit motherboard mentioned above seems good from the specs on the site,
    and i found one on pricespy for $200, but below it was an Abit NF7-SL (note
    the extra L on the end) for 2 dollars more, is there any differnce?
    Thanks for the help.
    -[Myth]-, May 19, 2004
    #8
  9. -[Myth]-

    -[Myth]- Guest

    On Thu, 20 May 2004 09:29:17 +1200, -[Myth]- wrote:

    > On Thu, 20 May 2004 01:23:40 +1200, Bruce Flyger wrote:
    >
    >> Stephen Williams wrote:
    >>>>Gigabyte GA-7NNXP
    >>>>Abit NF7-S
    >>>>DFI Lanparty NFII
    >>>>
    >>>>All 3 of these have onboard network adapters and very good onboard
    >>>>sound. They feature the Nvidia MCP-T Southbridge chip which offers
    >>>>hardware sound rivalling the performance of the Audigy series of
    >>>
    >>> soundcards.
    >>>
    >>>>Don't confuse the MCP-T with the MCP. Although the MCP chip also
    >>>>delivers onboard sound, it is not hardware based and does tax your CPU
    >>>>during games.
    >>>
    >>>
    >>> Well the main bonus of soundstorm is it's ability to encode surround sound 4
    >>> channel and 5.1 channel games in to 5.1 dolby digital and send that signal
    >>> out an optical link. You need a home theatre system to take advantage of it,
    >>> or a flash set of computer speakers that can decode dolby digital. A realtek
    >>> chip is used for analogue out, so it's hardly any better than your average
    >>> onboard audio unless u can use the optical link. Although i'm not sure of
    >>> this part, i think the only thing soundstorm can do without taxing the CPU
    >>> is that dolby digital encoding, for other tasks like hardware accelerated
    >>> sound in games etc, it won't be able to match an audigy in terms of CPU
    >>> usage
    >>>
    >>> Steve
    >>>
    >>>

    >> Analogue sound is still proccesed using the MCP-T chip, the realtek chip
    >> simply converts the processed sound and passes it though to analogue
    >> speakers.
    >> I have played many games using normal onboard sound and they really do
    >> tax the system heavily. Repeated slow downs and an all round drop in
    >> framerate is evident. The MCP-T however allows you to play games, in
    >> analogue, with all the bells and whistle, EAX etc with no framerate
    >> drops or stutters at all.
    >>
    >> There is a saying among the nforce2 forums that when you buy a
    >> motherboard featuring MCP-T soundstorm you are actually paying all that
    >> money for a great soundcard with a free motherboard thrown in.

    >
    > The Abit motherboard mentioned above seems good from the specs on the site,
    > and i found one on pricespy for $200, but below it was an Abit NF7-SL (note
    > the extra L on the end) for 2 dollars more, is there any differnce?
    > Thanks for the help.


    ooops, ignore that, its a socket 462 version :)
    -[Myth]-, May 19, 2004
    #9
  10. -[Myth]-

    colinco Guest

    In article <c2ftpq0hiil6.1ijpxeipj56zo$>,
    ve says...
    > > The Abit motherboard mentioned above seems good from the specs on the site,
    > > and i found one on pricespy for $200, but below it was an Abit NF7-SL (note
    > > the extra L on the end) for 2 dollars more, is there any differnce?
    > > Thanks for the help.

    >
    > ooops, ignore that, its a socket 462 version :)
    >

    How many pins do you think socket A has?
    The NF7-SL doesn't have the Seriell adapter included - (older drives to
    sata)
    colinco, May 19, 2004
    #10
  11. -[Myth]-

    Andrew Guest

    "-[Myth]-" <> wrote in message
    news:c2ftpq0hiil6.1ijpxeipj56zo$...
    > On Thu, 20 May 2004 09:29:17 +1200, -[Myth]- wrote:
    >
    > > On Thu, 20 May 2004 01:23:40 +1200, Bruce Flyger wrote:
    > >
    > >> Stephen Williams wrote:
    > >>>>Gigabyte GA-7NNXP
    > >>>>Abit NF7-S
    > >>>>DFI Lanparty NFII
    > >>>>
    > >>>>All 3 of these have onboard network adapters and very good onboard
    > >>>>sound. They feature the Nvidia MCP-T Southbridge chip which offers
    > >>>>hardware sound rivalling the performance of the Audigy series of
    > >>>
    > >>> soundcards.
    > >>>
    > >>>>Don't confuse the MCP-T with the MCP. Although the MCP chip also
    > >>>>delivers onboard sound, it is not hardware based and does tax your CPU
    > >>>>during games.
    > >>>
    > >>>
    > >>> Well the main bonus of soundstorm is it's ability to encode surround

    sound 4
    > >>> channel and 5.1 channel games in to 5.1 dolby digital and send that

    signal
    > >>> out an optical link. You need a home theatre system to take advantage

    of it,
    > >>> or a flash set of computer speakers that can decode dolby digital. A

    realtek
    > >>> chip is used for analogue out, so it's hardly any better than your

    average
    > >>> onboard audio unless u can use the optical link. Although i'm not

    sure of
    > >>> this part, i think the only thing soundstorm can do without taxing the

    CPU
    > >>> is that dolby digital encoding, for other tasks like hardware

    accelerated
    > >>> sound in games etc, it won't be able to match an audigy in terms of

    CPU
    > >>> usage
    > >>>
    > >>> Steve
    > >>>
    > >>>
    > >> Analogue sound is still proccesed using the MCP-T chip, the realtek

    chip
    > >> simply converts the processed sound and passes it though to analogue
    > >> speakers.
    > >> I have played many games using normal onboard sound and they really do
    > >> tax the system heavily. Repeated slow downs and an all round drop in
    > >> framerate is evident. The MCP-T however allows you to play games, in
    > >> analogue, with all the bells and whistle, EAX etc with no framerate
    > >> drops or stutters at all.
    > >>
    > >> There is a saying among the nforce2 forums that when you buy a
    > >> motherboard featuring MCP-T soundstorm you are actually paying all that
    > >> money for a great soundcard with a free motherboard thrown in.

    > >
    > > The Abit motherboard mentioned above seems good from the specs on the

    site,
    > > and i found one on pricespy for $200, but below it was an Abit NF7-SL

    (note
    > > the extra L on the end) for 2 dollars more, is there any differnce?
    > > Thanks for the help.

    >
    > ooops, ignore that, its a socket 462 version :)


    Socket A and socket 462 are exactly the same

    Im unsure exactly what the SL version is, Suppliers are selling them now,
    Cant find any reference to it on the Abit website at all, The only
    difference ive found is the SL has 2 years warranty where the S has 1 year

    But at the same time, Some suppliers offer different warranties anyway...
    Andrew, May 20, 2004
    #11
  12. -[Myth]-

    -[Myth]- Guest

    On Wed, 19 May 2004 22:52:28 +1200, ~misfit~ wrote:

    > Yep, all good boards. I have a Soltel SL-75FRN2-L myself. It doesn't have
    > the MCP-T southbridge but I'm happy with the sound and the price was
    > certainly good ($150). If it taxes my CPU it's not so's you'd notice. I get
    > good 3DMark scores for my system specs.
    >
    > What model is your 2200+? If it's a Tbred B then you should be able to get
    > some good performance out of it with a good, nForce2 Ultra 400 mobo. My
    > 1800+ is running on a 200FSB with a 10.5 multi giving me 2.1Ghz or around
    > XP2600+ performance. My memory is also at 200Mhz, dual channel. This old CPU
    > is going damn good. I liked it when I first got it, running at stock
    > (1.6Ghz). Once I got it in this board though it really took off. It'll do me
    > for a while yet.


    CPU Properties
    CPU Type AMD Athlon XP, 1800 MHz (6.75 x 267) 2200+
    CPU Alias Thoroughbred-A
    CPU Stepping A0
    L1 Code Cache 64 KB
    L1 Data Cache 64 KB
    L2 Cache 256 KB (On-Die, Full-Speed)

    CPU Physical Info
    Package Type 453 Pin PGA
    Package Size 4.95 cm x 4.95 cm
    Transistors 37.2 million
    Process Technology 6Mi, 0.13 um, CMOS, Cu
    Die Size 80 mm2
    Core Voltage 1.50 - 1.65 V
    I/O Voltage 1.6 V
    Typical Power 44.9 - 61.7 W (depending on clock speed)
    Maximum Power 49.4 - 67.9 W (depending on clock speed)


    453 pins? i thought socket A was 462.
    -[Myth]-, May 20, 2004
    #12
  13. -[Myth]-

    -[Myth]- Guest

    On Thu, 20 May 2004 17:56:12 +1200, -[Myth]- wrote:
    >blah blah blah


    Maybe its some non standard thing, many other things in my machine (a
    compaq presario) are non standard size (which is very annoying), but i
    doubt they'd get specially made processors, heres a pic of it:
    http://daviddl.orcon.net.nz/2200.jpg (sorry about the size, couldnt be
    bothered resizing it)
    -[Myth]-, May 20, 2004
    #13
  14. -[Myth]-

    ~misfit~ Guest

    -[Myth]- wrote:
    > On Thu, 20 May 2004 17:56:12 +1200, -[Myth]- wrote:
    >> blah blah blah

    >
    > Maybe its some non standard thing, many other things in my machine (a
    > compaq presario) are non standard size (which is very annoying), but i
    > doubt they'd get specially made processors, heres a pic of it:
    > http://daviddl.orcon.net.nz/2200.jpg (sorry about the size, couldnt be
    > bothered resizing it)


    I have an orcon account with a website but I've never used it. If you don't
    mind me asking, how do you go about uploading stuff to it? I've got a few
    pics I'd like to share. <g>

    Thanks.
    --
    ~misfit~
    ~misfit~, May 20, 2004
    #14
  15. -[Myth]-

    ~misfit~ Guest

    -[Myth]- wrote:
    > On Wed, 19 May 2004 22:52:28 +1200, ~misfit~ wrote:
    >
    >> Yep, all good boards. I have a Soltel SL-75FRN2-L myself. It doesn't
    >> have the MCP-T southbridge but I'm happy with the sound and the
    >> price was certainly good ($150). If it taxes my CPU it's not so's
    >> you'd notice. I get good 3DMark scores for my system specs.
    >>
    >> What model is your 2200+? If it's a Tbred B then you should be able
    >> to get some good performance out of it with a good, nForce2 Ultra
    >> 400 mobo. My 1800+ is running on a 200FSB with a 10.5 multi giving
    >> me 2.1Ghz or around XP2600+ performance. My memory is also at
    >> 200Mhz, dual channel. This old CPU is going damn good. I liked it
    >> when I first got it, running at stock (1.6Ghz). Once I got it in
    >> this board though it really took off. It'll do me for a while yet.

    >
    > CPU Properties
    > CPU Type AMD Athlon XP, 1800 MHz (6.75 x 267) 2200+
    > CPU Alias Thoroughbred-A
    > CPU Stepping A0
    > L1 Code Cache 64 KB
    > L1 Data Cache 64 KB
    > L2 Cache 256 KB (On-Die, Full-Speed)
    >
    > CPU Physical Info
    > Package Type 453 Pin PGA
    > Package Size 4.95 cm x 4.95 cm
    > Transistors 37.2 million
    > Process Technology 6Mi, 0.13 um, CMOS, Cu
    > Die Size 80 mm2
    > Core Voltage 1.50 - 1.65 V
    > I/O Voltage 1.6 V
    > Typical Power 44.9 - 61.7 W (depending on clock speed)
    > Maximum Power 49.4 - 67.9 W (depending on clock speed)
    >
    >
    > 453 pins? i thought socket A was 462.


    I think Socket A has 462 holes but most CPUs only have 453 pins.

    Tbred A, shame, they don't go as fast as the B's. Still, you could probably
    get a reasonable OC out of it on an nForce2 board. And the multiplier isn't
    locked so, if your RAM is up to it, you could go for a fast FSB and low
    multiplier for faster through-put. If your RAM isn't up to it you could
    still run a fast CPU FSB and run the RAM asynchronusly.

    You should get 2Ghz out of it I'd say, possibly more.
    --
    ~misfit~
    ~misfit~, May 20, 2004
    #15
  16. -[Myth]-

    -[Myth]- Guest

    On Thu, 20 May 2004 18:42:56 +1200, ~misfit~ wrote:

    > -[Myth]- wrote:
    >> On Thu, 20 May 2004 17:56:12 +1200, -[Myth]- wrote:
    >>> blah blah blah

    >>
    >> Maybe its some non standard thing, many other things in my machine (a
    >> compaq presario) are non standard size (which is very annoying), but i
    >> doubt they'd get specially made processors, heres a pic of it:
    >> http://daviddl.orcon.net.nz/2200.jpg (sorry about the size, couldnt be
    >> bothered resizing it)

    >
    > I have an orcon account with a website but I've never used it. If you don't
    > mind me asking, how do you go about uploading stuff to it? I've got a few
    > pics I'd like to share. <g>
    >
    > Thanks.


    just FTP to ftp://<yoursitegoeshere>.orcon.net.nz/ ,username and password
    are the same as for your orcon account.
    -[Myth]-, May 20, 2004
    #16
  17. -[Myth]-

    -[Myth]- Guest

    On Thu, 20 May 2004 18:44:57 +1200, ~misfit~ wrote:

    >...
    > I think Socket A has 462 holes but most CPUs only have 453 pins.
    >
    > Tbred A, shame, they don't go as fast as the B's. Still, you could probably
    > get a reasonable OC out of it on an nForce2 board. And the multiplier isn't
    > locked so, if your RAM is up to it, you could go for a fast FSB and low
    > multiplier for faster through-put. If your RAM isn't up to it you could
    > still run a fast CPU FSB and run the RAM asynchronusly.
    >
    > You should get 2Ghz out of it I'd say, possibly more.


    And this without potential damage?
    Also i was wondering about my ram, I would like to upgrade to 1GB, but i
    dont think its worth keeping my current RAM, which is two lots of 256mb,
    both seem to be pretty crap, they are:
    1. Samsung M3 68L3223DTL-CB0
    2. 256 MB PC2100 DDR SDRAM (no brand specified in the Sysinfo tool im
    using)
    Are these worth keeping, or should i use them in another, older machine and
    buy new stuff.
    Thanks for all the help again :)
    -[Myth]-, May 20, 2004
    #17
  18. -[Myth]-

    ~misfit~ Guest

    -[Myth]- wrote:
    > On Thu, 20 May 2004 18:42:56 +1200, ~misfit~ wrote:
    >
    >> -[Myth]- wrote:
    >>> On Thu, 20 May 2004 17:56:12 +1200, -[Myth]- wrote:
    >>>> blah blah blah
    >>>
    >>> Maybe its some non standard thing, many other things in my machine
    >>> (a compaq presario) are non standard size (which is very annoying),
    >>> but i doubt they'd get specially made processors, heres a pic of it:
    >>> http://daviddl.orcon.net.nz/2200.jpg (sorry about the size, couldnt
    >>> be bothered resizing it)

    >>
    >> I have an orcon account with a website but I've never used it. If
    >> you don't mind me asking, how do you go about uploading stuff to it?
    >> I've got a few pics I'd like to share. <g>
    >>
    >> Thanks.

    >
    > just FTP to ftp://<yoursitegoeshere>.orcon.net.nz/ ,username and
    > password are the same as for your orcon account.


    Thanks. I've never FTP'ed before so am not sure how to go about it. I'm a
    hardware man.

    Cheers,
    --
    ~misfit~
    ~misfit~, May 21, 2004
    #18
  19. -[Myth]-

    ~misfit~ Guest

    -[Myth]- wrote:
    > On Thu, 20 May 2004 18:44:57 +1200, ~misfit~ wrote:
    >
    >> ...
    >> I think Socket A has 462 holes but most CPUs only have 453 pins.
    >>
    >> Tbred A, shame, they don't go as fast as the B's. Still, you could
    >> probably get a reasonable OC out of it on an nForce2 board. And the
    >> multiplier isn't locked so, if your RAM is up to it, you could go
    >> for a fast FSB and low multiplier for faster through-put. If your
    >> RAM isn't up to it you could still run a fast CPU FSB and run the
    >> RAM asynchronusly.
    >>
    >> You should get 2Ghz out of it I'd say, possibly more.

    >
    > And this without potential damage?


    As long as you keep the CPU core cool enough and don't go crazy with the
    core voltage (vcore) you won't hurt the CPU.

    > Also i was wondering about my ram, I would like to upgrade to 1GB,
    > but i dont think its worth keeping my current RAM, which is two lots
    > of 256mb, both seem to be pretty crap, they are:
    > 1. Samsung M3 68L3223DTL-CB0
    > 2. 256 MB PC2100 DDR SDRAM (no brand specified in the Sysinfo tool im
    > using)
    > Are these worth keeping, or should i use them in another, older
    > machine and buy new stuff.


    I would relegate the RAM to an older machine if you have one that can use
    it. It's a bit slow and would hold back the new 512MB you want. Personally,
    if you can afford it, I would go for all new RAM, PC3200 or better. Two
    sticks of 512 if you want to use dual channel although, unless you are using
    a mobo with on-board graphics, the performance gain of dual over single
    channel is only in the regoin of 5% memory through-put. One 1GB stick may be
    significantly cheaper than two 512's, it's up to you.

    > Thanks for all the help again :)


    You're welcome.
    --
    ~misfit~
    ~misfit~, May 21, 2004
    #19
  20. -[Myth]-

    -[Myth]- Guest

    On Fri, 21 May 2004 13:00:37 +1200, ~misfit~ wrote:

    > -[Myth]- wrote:
    >> On Thu, 20 May 2004 18:42:56 +1200, ~misfit~ wrote:
    >>
    >>> -[Myth]- wrote:
    >>>> On Thu, 20 May 2004 17:56:12 +1200, -[Myth]- wrote:
    >>>>> blah blah blah
    >>>>
    >>>> Maybe its some non standard thing, many other things in my machine
    >>>> (a compaq presario) are non standard size (which is very annoying),
    >>>> but i doubt they'd get specially made processors, heres a pic of it:
    >>>> http://daviddl.orcon.net.nz/2200.jpg (sorry about the size, couldnt
    >>>> be bothered resizing it)
    >>>
    >>> I have an orcon account with a website but I've never used it. If
    >>> you don't mind me asking, how do you go about uploading stuff to it?
    >>> I've got a few pics I'd like to share. <g>
    >>>
    >>> Thanks.

    >>
    >> just FTP to ftp://<yoursitegoeshere>.orcon.net.nz/ ,username and
    >> password are the same as for your orcon account.

    >
    > Thanks. I've never FTP'ed before so am not sure how to go about it. I'm a
    > hardware man.
    >
    > Cheers,


    use a specialised FTP program like WS_FTP , CuteFTP or just use internet
    explorer, however IE does not upload ascii files correctly, but if you are
    just using it for images that wont matter, to use IE just type
    ftp://yourusername:/ in the address
    bar
    -[Myth]-, May 21, 2004
    #20
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