New Microsoft Security scare?

Discussion in 'Computer Security' started by Peter James, Feb 11, 2004.

  1. Peter James

    Peter James Guest

    There was mention on the BBC lunchtime news today of a "hole" in the
    Microsoft OS that has recently been discovered, and the patch for this
    available today.
    Can anyone throw any light on just what this security hole actually
    is. Keep it simple for a non-anorak. Thanks
    --

    Peter James
    Change AT to @ to reply
     
    Peter James, Feb 11, 2004
    #1
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  2. Peter James

    Guest

    On Wed, 11 Feb 2004 16:14:24 +0000, Peter James
    <> wrote:

    >There was mention on the BBC lunchtime news today of a "hole" in the
    >Microsoft OS that has recently been discovered, and the patch for this
    >available today.
    >Can anyone throw any light on just what this security hole actually
    >is. Keep it simple for a non-anorak. Thanks


    from what i can gather all the AV products , spyware and trojan
    scanners and firewalls in the world is not enough to protect you if
    you are using a MS operating system - especially the ones built on NT
    code.
    home users will have to adopt the tactics of the big internet cafes
    such as easyinternet. what happens there is that a fresh image is
    written to the computer every time it is rebooted.
    this may be impractical for home users but wiping the disk with a
    fresh ghost image every day may be the only way to keep it virus free.
    of course that will require the user to have two PCs .
    one connected to the net which is wiped afresh every day and another
    one where he keeps his work and data and which NEVER UNDER ANY
    CIRCUMSTANCES connects to the internet.
     
    , Feb 11, 2004
    #2
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  3. Peter James

    IPGrunt Guest

    "" <> seems to think in
    news::

    > On Wed, 11 Feb 2004 16:14:24 +0000, Peter James
    > <> wrote:
    >
    >>There was mention on the BBC lunchtime news today of a "hole" in the
    >>Microsoft OS that has recently been discovered, and the patch for this
    >>available today.
    >>Can anyone throw any light on just what this security hole actually
    >>is. Keep it simple for a non-anorak. Thanks

    >
    > from what i can gather all the AV products , spyware and trojan
    > scanners and firewalls in the world is not enough to protect you if
    > you are using a MS operating system - especially the ones built on NT
    > code.
    > home users will have to adopt the tactics of the big internet cafes
    > such as easyinternet. what happens there is that a fresh image is
    > written to the computer every time it is rebooted.
    > this may be impractical for home users but wiping the disk with a
    > fresh ghost image every day may be the only way to keep it virus free.
    > of course that will require the user to have two PCs .
    > one connected to the net which is wiped afresh every day and another
    > one where he keeps his work and data and which NEVER UNDER ANY
    > CIRCUMSTANCES connects to the internet.
    >



    Microsoft released a new security bulletin yesterday re: an exploit
    against Virtual Win for Mac. It's another one of the elevation of
    privilge type exploits, but the cracker must have a valid system
    credental to utilize effectively this "hole".

    However, I doubt if the press would have been reporting on this
    articular problem...it's too current and has little wide impact.

    The worst thing to come along on Windows in a while has been this MYDOOM
    virus/worm. No doubt you've seen the emails with the subject lines, Hi,
    hello , Status, Server Report, Error, Mail Transaction Failed, etc. This
    is MYDOOM.A propagating. For more info, see Trend Micro, or Norton, or
    Kaspersi or any of the other antiV sites.

    Sometimes those press guys simply have nothing else to write about, so
    why not open their website and report on any one of dozens of so-called
    "holes" in the OS?

    If you have questions about M$ security exploits, visit
    www.microsoft.com/security where you'll find extensive info. You can
    sign up to be notified when they release a new security bulletin,
    download patches, research security issues, get whitepapers on best
    practices.

    What is the best defense against a cracker seizing hold of your machine?

    a) firewall
    b) antivirus
    c) antispyware
    d) software patches
    e) anon remailer
    f) proxy server


    All of the above are important to use, and appropriate for different
    reasons and exploits and/or threats.

    However, the best defense is a working knowledge of how and what can be
    done to crack your system or network. Only then can you put the above
    tools to proper use.

    -- ipgrunt
     
    IPGrunt, Feb 11, 2004
    #3
  4. Peter James

    Leythos Guest

    In article <>, sam1967
    @hetnet.nl says...
    > On Wed, 11 Feb 2004 16:14:24 +0000, Peter James
    > <> wrote:
    >
    > >There was mention on the BBC lunchtime news today of a "hole" in the
    > >Microsoft OS that has recently been discovered, and the patch for this
    > >available today.
    > >Can anyone throw any light on just what this security hole actually
    > >is. Keep it simple for a non-anorak. Thanks

    >
    > from what i can gather all the AV products , spyware and trojan
    > scanners and firewalls in the world is not enough to protect you if
    > you are using a MS operating system - especially the ones built on NT
    > code.
    > home users will have to adopt the tactics of the big internet cafes
    > such as easyinternet. what happens there is that a fresh image is
    > written to the computer every time it is rebooted.
    > this may be impractical for home users but wiping the disk with a
    > fresh ghost image every day may be the only way to keep it virus free.
    > of course that will require the user to have two PCs .
    > one connected to the net which is wiped afresh every day and another
    > one where he keeps his work and data and which NEVER UNDER ANY
    > CIRCUMSTANCES connects to the internet.


    I've been using MS operating systems on my home and office computer
    since they were put out in the market, same with several flavors of Unix
    OS's. In my time with computers, since the early 70's, I can say that
    not one computer I've ever owned or been responsible for has ever been
    infected by a virus/worm, and none of them has been compromised either.

    I never understand how people with so little understanding can spout off
    about how bad MS is, esp. when they've never take the time to learn how
    to secure it. Every OS has holes, but the one with the largest user base
    the only one that people attack on a regular basis.

    I have a large number of systems in my home and almost all of them are
    MS based and not one has ever been infected/hacked and they are all
    connected to the internet. This one, the one I'm typing from, has been
    my main workstation for two years and has not been wiped/reinstalled in
    that time and has provided anonymous access to internet users from time
    to time.

    Kind of blows a hole in the statement you made, doesn't it.

    --
    --

    (Remove 999 to reply to me)
     
    Leythos, Feb 11, 2004
    #4
  5. Peter James

    Guest

    On Wed, 11 Feb 2004 21:02:41 GMT, Leythos <> wrote:

    >In article <>, sam1967
    >@hetnet.nl says...
    >> On Wed, 11 Feb 2004 16:14:24 +0000, Peter James
    >> <> wrote:
    >>
    >> >There was mention on the BBC lunchtime news today of a "hole" in the
    >> >Microsoft OS that has recently been discovered, and the patch for this
    >> >available today.
    >> >Can anyone throw any light on just what this security hole actually
    >> >is. Keep it simple for a non-anorak. Thanks

    >>
    >> from what i can gather all the AV products , spyware and trojan
    >> scanners and firewalls in the world is not enough to protect you if
    >> you are using a MS operating system - especially the ones built on NT
    >> code.
    >> home users will have to adopt the tactics of the big internet cafes
    >> such as easyinternet. what happens there is that a fresh image is
    >> written to the computer every time it is rebooted.
    >> this may be impractical for home users but wiping the disk with a
    >> fresh ghost image every day may be the only way to keep it virus free.
    >> of course that will require the user to have two PCs .
    >> one connected to the net which is wiped afresh every day and another
    >> one where he keeps his work and data and which NEVER UNDER ANY
    >> CIRCUMSTANCES connects to the internet.

    >
    >I've been using MS operating systems on my home and office computer
    >since they were put out in the market, same with several flavors of Unix
    >OS's. In my time with computers, since the early 70's, I can say that
    >not one computer I've ever owned or been responsible for has ever been
    >infected by a virus/worm, and none of them has been compromised either.
    >
    >I never understand how people with so little understanding can spout off
    >about how bad MS is, esp. when they've never take the time to learn how
    >to secure it. Every OS has holes, but the one with the largest user base
    >the only one that people attack on a regular basis.
    >
    >I have a large number of systems in my home and almost all of them are
    >MS based and not one has ever been infected/hacked and they are all
    >connected to the internet. This one, the one I'm typing from, has been
    >my main workstation for two years and has not been wiped/reinstalled in
    >that time and has provided anonymous access to internet users from time
    >to time.
    >
    >Kind of blows a hole in the statement you made, doesn't it.
    >

    FYI I am MCSE in win2k and NT 4. I know how shit M$ products are
    because I nearly fell ill after supporting them for 6 years for big
    corporates (nazis).
    The software is junk and I am switching to Linux when I get the chance
    and ripping up my M$ certs as well.
    I was a sysadmin and I get a headache just thinking about all the
    updates that have to be applied to patch this shit software.,
    what chance does an average user have ? the answer is not a chance in
    hell. the least they can do is switch to opera/mozilla and ditch OE as
    well.
    I connected a WinXP (cursed sw) box to the internet for a friend and
    within 5 minutes it was BLASTERed. i wiped it and put on Windows 98.
     
    , Feb 11, 2004
    #5
  6. Peter James

    Frode Guest

    -----BEGIN PGP SIGNED MESSAGE-----
    Hash: SHA1

    wrote:
    >>Kind of blows a hole in the statement you made, doesn't it.

    >FYI I am MCSE in win2k and NT 4.


    I've met my share of MCPs and MCSEs over the years. Most of them, while
    having a nice paper to show, couldn't form a creative thought to save their
    lives. Point being, certifications don't automatically lend you any
    credence in the practical world.

    >I know how shit M$ products are


    Any OS is only as good as its tech guy. You can have a Linux server so full
    of holes you can drive a car through it just as well as you can with an MS
    system.

    >because I nearly fell ill after supporting them for 6 years for big
    >corporates (nazis).


    Good going. That'll make people take you seriously.

    >The software is junk and I am switching to Linux when I get the chance
    >and ripping up my M$ certs as well.
    >I was a sysadmin and I get a headache just thinking about all the
    >updates that have to be applied to patch this shit software.,


    Not too long ago I had to upgrade openssl (hm, or was it openssh, I forget)
    two or was it three times within a single week or so. Considering my rather
    old distro that meant downloading a tarball, configuring and compiling each
    time. I'd take a windows update like system over that any day (some distros
    do have that).

    >what chance does an average user have ?


    Just as much as they have with installing a Linux distro. While I haven't
    done an exhaustive test, virtually all distros I've tested come with way
    more daemons enabled than can be considered in any way secure, not to
    mention versions with known security holes.


    - --
    Frode


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    Frode, Feb 11, 2004
    #6
  7. Peter James

    donutbandit Guest

    "" <> wrote in
    news::

    > from what i can gather all the AV products , spyware and trojan
    > scanners and firewalls in the world is not enough to protect you if
    > you are using a MS operating system - especially the ones built on NT
    > code.
    >


    Nonsense. Pure, utter poppycock.

    Tbe average home user needs only to practice "safe computing" to be 99%
    immune to any of the recent exploits.

    "Safe computing:"

    1. Do not use Outlook Express. I recommend not using Internet Explorer
    either, but those who do should make sure it's patched up to date, disable
    "install on demand" and javascript, and configure the security settings to
    a high level. However, I highly recommend using a Gecko based browser like
    Mozilla, Firefox or Netscape, since doing so automatically makes these
    exploits null and void.

    2. Never open unknown attachments.

    3. Stay away from P2P networks.

    4. Use a simple software firewall that will alert you to changes in
    programs, and when disallowed programs try to call out. It simply doesn't
    get any better than Kerio 2.1.5 for this.

    5. Use a simple free AV program that will alert you if something you
    downloaded is infected. I use AVG, and it has alerted me twice in the past
    to infected files.

    6. Scan occasionally for trojans and viruses: but if you practice safe
    computing, there is really no chance of getting any.

    7. Be very careful about purchased CD with games, programs, etc. on them.
    Many contain spy and adware.

    That's basically it. If 100% of the people who contracted and spread the
    Lovsan worm (or any of the others) used Eudora (just an example) rather
    than OE, worms would be almost nonexistent. They use the built in
    insecurities in OE (and the built in ignorance of the average computer
    user) to proliferate.

    I am speaking of the single home user, not those running a network, or who
    allows others to access and use their computer.
     
    donutbandit, Feb 11, 2004
    #7
  8. Peter James

    Leythos Guest

    In article <>, sam1967
    @hetnet.nl says...
    > I connected a WinXP (cursed sw) box to the internet for a friend and
    > within 5 minutes it was BLASTERed. i wiped it and put on Windows 98.


    You just gave yourself away with this line - you almost had us thinking
    you were just an upset, out of work, MCSE, but it's completely apparent
    to anyone that you can't be an MCSE or any other type of support person.

    No MCSE or tech support person would connect a unprotected system to the
    internet without first ensuring that it was protected. Heck, even a
    first year MCSE knows enough to turn off the services that can get
    compromised before connecting to the net to get the updates when there
    is no protection on the system.

    What the heck kind of MCSE goes to a friends house to help with a
    computer and doesn't take his CD's choked full of goodies (like the Free
    Zonealarm, the free Spybot, etc...).

    Nice trolling, you almost fooled some people.

    --
    --

    (Remove 999 to reply to me)
     
    Leythos, Feb 11, 2004
    #8
  9. Peter James

    Leythos Guest

    In article <>, sam1967
    @hetnet.nl says...
    > FYI I am MCSE in win2k and NT 4. I know how shit M$ products are
    > because I nearly fell ill after supporting them for 6 years for big
    > corporates (nazis).
    > The software is junk and I am switching to Linux when I get the chance
    > and ripping up my M$ certs as well.
    > I was a sysadmin and I get a headache just thinking about all the
    > updates that have to be applied to patch this shit software.,
    > what chance does an average user have ? the answer is not a chance in
    > hell. the least they can do is switch to opera/mozilla and ditch OE as
    > well.


    You sure act like a paper MCSE, meaning one that took the tests and
    didn't really learn anything about the content, just enough to pass the
    tests.

    I design systems for fortune 1000 companies all over the globe, most of
    the systems use Windows 2000 or Windows 2003 (most have migrated from
    NT) along with Sun OS, HPUX, etc...

    All of the places I've been have problems with all of their workstation
    platforms, but very few have problems with their servers on any
    platform.

    As for pushing updates, Windows XP on the desktop made that easy and
    brainless. As for being unable to handle the job, well, we've seen from
    your other posts that you really don't have a clue about networking or
    security, so I can understand your being ill.


    --
    --

    (Remove 999 to reply to me)
     
    Leythos, Feb 11, 2004
    #9
  10. Peter James

    Rowdy Yates Guest

    Frode <> wrote in
    news::

    > -----BEGIN PGP SIGNED MESSAGE-----
    > Hash: SHA1
    >
    > wrote:
    >>>Kind of blows a hole in the statement you made, doesn't it.

    >>FYI I am MCSE in win2k and NT 4.

    >
    > I've met my share of MCPs and MCSEs over the years. Most of them,
    > while having a nice paper to show, couldn't form a creative thought to
    > save their lives. Point being, certifications don't automatically lend
    > you any credence in the practical world.


    a mcse cert. does not mean competence. what it does mean is that you have
    bothered to learn how microsoft want you to use their products and study
    and sit through 7 exams. just like anything else in life. there are good
    and bad tech. people. i have been in the industy for a little over 6 years.
    i have yet to meet a mcse who does not know what the hell he is doing.

    most paper mcse's snuck into the workplace thanks to the insanity of the
    ..com era. paper mcse's are slowly dwindling out of the work place.

    also, most mcse's hold a bunch of other certs as well. usually whatever
    platfrom they work on.



    --
    Rowdy Yates
    MCSE, MCSA, MCP, CNA, Secrity+, Linux+, IT Project+, LPIC1
    I am Against-TCPA
    http://www.againsttcpa.com
     
    Rowdy Yates, Feb 12, 2004
    #10
  11. Peter James

    Rowdy Yates Guest

    Rowdy Yates <> wrote in
    news:Xns948CE4A0C8387rowdyyatesnospamlyco@66.185.95.104:

    > bunch of other certs as well. usually whatever
    > platfrom they work on.


    lastly. if you really have met incompetent paper mcse's who screwed up a
    network. someone had to have made the decision to hire this guy, right?
    perhaps your HR department is full of "paper" HR's?


    --
    Rowdy Yates
    "Command prompt's make me horny!"
    I am Against-TCPA
    http://www.againsttcpa.com
     
    Rowdy Yates, Feb 12, 2004
    #11
  12. Peter James

    Jon Leirdal Guest

    On Wed, 11 Feb 2004 16:14:24 +0000, Peter James
    <> wrote:

    > There was mention on the BBC lunchtime news today of a "hole" in the
    > Microsoft OS that has recently been discovered, and the patch for this
    > available today.
    > Can anyone throw any light on just what this security hole actually
    > is. Keep it simple for a non-anorak. Thanks


    According eEye there was to errors in the ASN.1 library.

    I'll try to explain it a little easy, but try reading the URL's below.
    Anyway: Roughly speaking it is the code that MS uses to verify security
    permissions on your computer.
    That is access to your computer from the net. (among other things)
    The error exists in all MS OS (98, NT, 2K, XP, 2K3 osv).

    http://www.eeye.com/html/Press/PR20040210.html
    http://www.eeye.com/html/Research/Advisories/AD20040210.html
    http://www.eeye.com/html/Research/Advisories/AD20040210-2.html

    Jon

    (Hey guys don't shoot me for over-simplifying it)
    (And english is not my native language so please excuse any typos and
    grammatical errors)
     
    Jon Leirdal, Feb 12, 2004
    #12
  13. Peter James

    Dazz Guest

    On Wed, 11 Feb 2004 23:20:32 GMT, Leythos <> wrote:

    <snipped>

    >No MCSE or tech support person would connect a unprotected system to the
    >internet without first ensuring that it was protected. Heck, even a
    >first year MCSE knows enough to turn off the services that can get
    >compromised before connecting to the net to get the updates when there
    >is no protection on the system.


    Bwahahahahaha. I think you just gave yourself away. :)

    I have come across many MCSE's that don't have a clue about how to
    *secure* a system, let alone fix a problem when it occurs.

    This isn't to say that I haven't met some very good MCSE's, but the
    majority that I have come across think they know it all, simply
    because they've read some books and sat some exams.

    When it comes to real life situations, an MCSE cert doesn't mean shit.

    I hope this doesn't burst your little bubble.

    >What the heck kind of MCSE goes to a friends house to help with a
    >computer and doesn't take his CD's choked full of goodies (like the Free
    >Zonealarm, the free Spybot, etc...).


    I think you should re-write that first sentence to read "What the heck
    kind of a person with any common-sense ..."

    Dazz
     
    Dazz, Feb 12, 2004
    #13
  14. Peter James

    Leythos Guest

    In article <>,
    says...
    > I have come across many MCSE's that don't have a clue about how to
    > *secure* a system, let alone fix a problem when it occurs.
    >
    > This isn't to say that I haven't met some very good MCSE's, but the
    > majority that I have come across think they know it all, simply
    > because they've read some books and sat some exams.


    That's mostly my experience with them too. The ones that are good are
    the ones that have experience and just happen to have got he MCP or MCSE
    for the added benefit it can have.

    When I hire someone, if all they have is an MCSE, in general, I don't
    give them any brownie points for it, in fact, most times it counts
    against them. I would take a person with 10 years experience and no
    certs over someone that has a MCSE and other MS certs that does not have
    the experience level of the 10 year candidate.

    --
    --

    (Remove 999 to reply to me)
     
    Leythos, Feb 12, 2004
    #14
  15. Peter James

    Peter James Guest

    On Wed, 11 Feb 2004 16:14:24 +0000, Peter James
    <> wrote:

    >There was mention on the BBC lunchtime news today of a "hole" in the
    >Microsoft OS that has recently been discovered, and the patch for this
    >available today.
    >Can anyone throw any light on just what this security hole actually
    >is. Keep it simple for a non-anorak. Thanks

    Many thanks for all of the replies. I'm no techie, so my knowledge is
    basic and picked up as I go along. But I don't use IE or Outlook, and
    I do scan for virus and malware, and so far I've been lucky. Thanks
    again.
    --

    Peter James
    Change AT to @ to reply
     
    Peter James, Feb 12, 2004
    #15
  16. Peter James

    Dazz Guest

    On Thu, 12 Feb 2004 08:54:07 GMT, Leythos <> wrote:

    >In article <>,
    > says...
    >> I have come across many MCSE's that don't have a clue about how to
    >> *secure* a system, let alone fix a problem when it occurs.
    >>
    >> This isn't to say that I haven't met some very good MCSE's, but the
    >> majority that I have come across think they know it all, simply
    >> because they've read some books and sat some exams.

    >
    >That's mostly my experience with them too. The ones that are good are
    >the ones that have experience and just happen to have got he MCP or MCSE
    >for the added benefit it can have.


    So very true.

    >When I hire someone, if all they have is an MCSE, in general, I don't
    >give them any brownie points for it, in fact, most times it counts
    >against them. I would take a person with 10 years experience and no
    >certs over someone that has a MCSE and other MS certs that does not have
    >the experience level of the 10 year candidate.


    Excellent. :)

    I think the IT industry needs more people like you to weed out "paper"
    MCSE's, and then maybe certification will begin to mean something.

    Maybe then, I'll *actually* get off my butt and get a certification
    that I can be *proud* to hold. :)

    Dazz

    >--
     
    Dazz, Feb 12, 2004
    #16
  17. Peter James

    Guest

    On Wed, 11 Feb 2004 23:20:32 GMT, Leythos <> wrote:

    >In article <>, sam1967
    >@hetnet.nl says...
    >> I connected a WinXP (cursed sw) box to the internet for a friend and
    >> within 5 minutes it was BLASTERed. i wiped it and put on Windows 98.

    >
    >You just gave yourself away with this line - you almost had us thinking
    >you were just an upset, out of work, MCSE, but it's completely apparent
    >to anyone that you can't be an MCSE or any other type of support person.
    >
    >No MCSE or tech support person would connect a unprotected system to the
    >internet without first ensuring that it was protected. Heck, even a
    >first year MCSE knows enough to turn off the services that can get
    >compromised before connecting to the net to get the updates when there
    >is no protection on the system.
    >
    >What the heck kind of MCSE goes to a friends house to help with a
    >computer and doesn't take his CD's choked full of goodies (like the Free
    >Zonealarm, the free Spybot, etc...).
    >


    I only connect windows 98 boxes to the internet as a rule as I know
    how insecure the other platforms are.
    This person wanted XP and I knew it was a shit product.
    I was SURPRISED to discover just how SHIT it is.
    I maybe should say ex-MCSE since I have not studied any M$ stuff for
    well over a year and would like to forget it even exists.
    I have deliberately tried to remove all traces of the propagandistic,
    crippled, biased teaching methods and ideologies from my mind.
    As you are well aware security is not taught in any meaningful form as
    M$ try and pretend security is not an issue with their products.

    I am currently involved with ADSL projects and will be setting up a
    VPN using Draytek Vigor routers shortly.
    Hopefully they will not ask me anything about M$ shit as I really want
    to forget it all.

    You are asking the wrong questions.
    The question you should be asking is WHY should a user need to install
    spybot, spyblaster, ad-aware, kerio pf, avast, avg and e-trust just
    before they can dare to connect to the internet ?
    answer is they shouldnt and if you were honest - and intelligent - you
    would admit this.
    But I fear you are neither.
     
    , Feb 12, 2004
    #17
  18. Peter James

    Guest

    On 11 Feb 2004 23:10:52 GMT, donutbandit <> wrote:

    >"" <> wrote in
    >news::
    >
    >> from what i can gather all the AV products , spyware and trojan
    >> scanners and firewalls in the world is not enough to protect you if
    >> you are using a MS operating system - especially the ones built on NT
    >> code.
    >>

    >
    >Nonsense. Pure, utter poppycock.
    >
    >Tbe average home user needs only to practice "safe computing" to be 99%
    >immune to any of the recent exploits.
    >
    >"Safe computing:"
    >


    >1. Do not use Outlook Express. I recommend not using Internet Explorer
    >either, but those who do should make sure it's patched up to date, disable
    >"install on demand" and javascript, and configure the security settings to
    >a high level. However, I highly recommend using a Gecko based browser like
    >Mozilla, Firefox or Netscape, since doing so automatically makes these
    >exploits null and void.
    >
    >2. Never open unknown attachments.
    >
    >3. Stay away from P2P networks.
    >
    >4. Use a simple software firewall that will alert you to changes in
    >programs, and when disallowed programs try to call out. It simply doesn't
    >get any better than Kerio 2.1.5 for this.
    >
    >5. Use a simple free AV program that will alert you if something you
    >downloaded is infected. I use AVG, and it has alerted me twice in the past
    >to infected files.
    >
    >6. Scan occasionally for trojans and viruses: but if you practice safe
    >computing, there is really no chance of getting any.
    >
    >7. Be very careful about purchased CD with games, programs, etc. on them.
    >Many contain spy and adware.
    >
    >That's basically it. If 100% of the people who contracted and spread the
    >Lovsan worm (or any of the others) used Eudora (just an example) rather
    >than OE, worms would be almost nonexistent. They use the built in
    >insecurities in OE (and the built in ignorance of the average computer
    >user) to proliferate.
    >
    >I am speaking of the single home user, not those running a network, or who
    >allows others to access and use their computer.


    all excellent points. but the chances of the above happening are about
    a million to one.
     
    , Feb 12, 2004
    #18
  19. Peter James

    Leythos Guest

    In article <>, sam1967
    @hetnet.nl says...
    > I only connect windows 98 boxes to the internet as a rule as I know
    > how insecure the other platforms are.
    > This person wanted XP and I knew it was a shit product.
    > I was SURPRISED to discover just how SHIT it is.
    > I maybe should say ex-MCSE since I have not studied any M$ stuff for
    > well over a year and would like to forget it even exists.


    This would make you a "Paper-MCSE", one that didn't learn anything about
    the material, and that has no experience with MS products or networking.

    In fact, I would also suggest that on top of being a troll that you are
    in some way related to Tracker.

    --
    --

    (Remove 999 to reply to me)
     
    Leythos, Feb 12, 2004
    #19
  20. Peter James

    Guest

    On Thu, 12 Feb 2004 17:06:52 GMT, Leythos <> wrote:

    >In article <>, sam1967
    >@hetnet.nl says...
    >> I only connect windows 98 boxes to the internet as a rule as I know
    >> how insecure the other platforms are.
    >> This person wanted XP and I knew it was a shit product.
    >> I was SURPRISED to discover just how SHIT it is.
    >> I maybe should say ex-MCSE since I have not studied any M$ stuff for
    >> well over a year and would like to forget it even exists.

    >
    >This would make you a "Paper-MCSE", one that didn't learn anything about
    >the material, and that has no experience with MS products or networking.
    >

    I dont need to prove my technical skills to anyone who uses a RR cable
    modem do I ?
    I certainly dont need to prove them to such an opinionated blowhard as
    yourself do I ?
     
    , Feb 12, 2004
    #20
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