New Ext. HD questions

Discussion in 'Computer Support' started by MZB, Jan 8, 2009.

  1. MZB

    MZB Guest

    I use XP HOME.

    I just got a new 1 TB Ext. HD. I will connect via USB port.

    I
    1) When I do the initial format (It come with FAT32 and I will make it
    NTFS), should I do the full format or Quick format (I'm thinking the full
    format makes more sense for the first time?).

    2) Now, I would like to have 3 partitions, E (300 GB), F(300 GB), and H
    (remainder of the GB). Basically, I'm going to be using it with 3
    computers. Two of
    them have virtual G drives so I prefer E, F, and H. Is this possible?

    3) If so, do you partition at the same time you format, or is this done
    after formatting (or before?).

    I'm just a bit confused on the order of things. Also, to accomplish #2 and
    #3 above, do I right click My Computer/Manage/Disk Management and then
    figure it out from there?

    Is there any step I'm missing? I've heard about something called Initialize.
    When do I do this and is it necessary?

    I'm just uncertain (somewhat) on how to proceed here.

    Mel

    Mel
     
    MZB, Jan 8, 2009
    #1
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  2. MZB

    chuckcar Guest

    "MZB" <> wrote in news:nxv9l.1$:

    > I use XP HOME.
    >
    > I just got a new 1 TB Ext. HD. I will connect via USB port.
    >
    > I
    > 1) When I do the initial format (It come with FAT32 and I will make it
    > NTFS), should I do the full format or Quick format (I'm thinking the
    > full format makes more sense for the first time?).
    >
    > 2) Now, I would like to have 3 partitions, E (300 GB), F(300 GB), and H
    > (remainder of the GB). Basically, I'm going to be using it with 3
    > computers. Two of
    > them have virtual G drives so I prefer E, F, and H. Is this possible?
    >
    > 3) If so, do you partition at the same time you format, or is this done
    > after formatting (or before?).
    >
    > I'm just a bit confused on the order of things. Also, to accomplish #2
    > and #3 above, do I right click My Computer/Manage/Disk Management and
    > then figure it out from there?
    >
    > Is there any step I'm missing? I've heard about something called
    > Initialize. When do I do this and is it necessary?
    >
    > I'm just uncertain (somewhat) on how to proceed here.
    >

    When you partition a physical hard drive, that makes logical (i.e. D:
    E:...) drives. You then format each of those drives. There is nothing *to*
    format before the drive is partitioned. You will have to remove the
    existing partition first if they say it's already formatted. I've never
    heard the term initialize used except by people who don't know the
    difference between partitioning and formatting a drive, so i'd let it
    pass.

    --
    (setq (chuck nil) car(chuck) )
     
    chuckcar, Jan 9, 2009
    #2
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  3. MZB

    Guest

    , Jan 9, 2009
    #3
  4. MZB

    chuckcar Guest

    wrote in
    news::

    > chuckcar <> wrote:
    >
    >>I've never
    >>heard the term initialize used except by people who don't know the
    >>difference between partitioning and formatting a drive,

    >
    > http://tinyurl.com/6tpnl8


    A simple google search proves nothing. I've heard the term used to talk
    about resetting a drive to track 0, formatting a drive, partitioning a
    drive, wiping the information on a disk (of numerous sorts) and so on. The
    term is not used with any kind of consistancy and has no hard and fast
    meaning. Therefore it (in this context - it *does* have very definite
    meanings in programming for example) is pointless to use it.

    --
    (setq (chuck nil) car(chuck) )
     
    chuckcar, Jan 9, 2009
    #4
  5. MZB

    MZB Guest

    Chuck, et. al:

    I completed the task. It took 3 minutes at most (I just did the quick
    format).

    The concept of "initialization" did not arise.

    Mel
    "chuckcar" <> wrote in message
    news:Xns9B8DE1AE42183chucknilcar@127.0.0.1...
    > wrote in
    > news::
    >
    >> chuckcar <> wrote:
    >>
    >>>I've never
    >>>heard the term initialize used except by people who don't know the
    >>>difference between partitioning and formatting a drive,

    >>
    >> http://tinyurl.com/6tpnl8

    >
    > A simple google search proves nothing. I've heard the term used to talk
    > about resetting a drive to track 0, formatting a drive, partitioning a
    > drive, wiping the information on a disk (of numerous sorts) and so on. The
    > term is not used with any kind of consistancy and has no hard and fast
    > meaning. Therefore it (in this context - it *does* have very definite
    > meanings in programming for example) is pointless to use it.
    >
    > --
    > (setq (chuck nil) car(chuck) )
     
    MZB, Jan 9, 2009
    #5
  6. MZB

    chuckcar Guest

    Jimchip <> wrote in
    news::

    >> A simple google search proves nothing. I've heard the term used to talk
    >> about resetting a drive to track 0, formatting a drive, partitioning a
    >> drive, wiping the information on a disk (of numerous sorts) and so on.
    >> The term is not used with any kind of consistancy and has no hard and
    >> fast meaning. Therefore it (in this context - it *does* have very
    >> definite meanings in programming for example) is pointless to use it.

    >
    > M$ uses the term for their 'Intialize and Convert Wizard' so it might be
    > useful to know what they mean by it in order to set things up correctly.
    >
    > http://www.microsoft.com/windowsxp/using/setup/tips/advanced/ntfs.mspx
    >
    > "4. If the Initialize and Convert Disk Wizard appears, click Next. If
    > the wizard does not appear, skip to step 8."
    >
    > "5. On the Select Disks to Initialize page, click Next."
    >
    > "7. On the Completing the Initialize and Convert Disk Wizard page, click
    > Finish."
    >

    They use the term format in it proper context several times on that page.
    "Initialize" never seems to be defined although they *seem* to be talking
    about partitioning it. Shows nothing beyond what I said. The proper term
    - even in MS lingo - is partition and it's context relevant derivatives as in
    -ing -ed etc.

    --
    (setq (chuck nil) car(chuck) )
     
    chuckcar, Jan 9, 2009
    #6
  7. MZB

    chuckcar Guest

    Jimchip <> wrote in
    news::

    > On 2009-01-09, chuckcar <> wrote:
    >> Jimchip <> wrote in
    >> news::


    >> They use the term format in it proper context several times on that
    >> page. "Initialize" never seems to be defined although they *seem* to be
    >> talking about partitioning it. Shows nothing beyond what I said. The
    >> proper term - even in MS lingo - is partition and it's context relevant
    >> derivatives as in -ing -ed etc.

    >
    > Previously you said:
    > "I've never heard the term initialize used except by people who don't
    > know the difference between partitioning and formatting a drive."
    >
    > They're not defining the term in the ref but they're using the term, the
    > meaning of which has to be deduced. I believe they are meaning that the
    > disk is recognized and 'initialized' by the OS as one of the selectable
    > types, the most common ones being 'Basic' and various RAID configs. The
    > new GPT for large disks is now an option in newer M$ OS's. After it is
    > initialized, it can then be further altered by the relevant disk
    > routines, including partition, quick format, format, etc. Striped RAID
    > configs need to be initialized as such, before formatting, for example.
    >

    Adding the device would be done by the drive controller and/or the bios.
    Never by the operating system no matter what type of drive is being dealt with.
    There is *never* a need to format and then quick format a hard drive. The
    fact that you put them in that order makes me wonder how much you actually
    know on the subject. Pop quiz: what is the largest disk that msdos 5.0
    alone could use all of?

    > You may feel it's pointless, but it is a fact that M$ uses the term. One
    > doesn't necessarily get to hold others to one's notion of proper usage
    > of technical terms. Like a lot of technical terms, 'Initialize' as a
    > generic term has been adopted by M$ as a very specific, context
    > dependent, disk operation.
    >

    *What* disk operation? When? it changes all the time depending on the
    source as I originally said.

    Look, I never said that the term wasn't used. Only that the meaning of it
    is missing.

    --
    (setq (chuck nil) car(chuck) )
     
    chuckcar, Jan 10, 2009
    #7
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