New Computer opinions wanted...

Discussion in 'NZ Computing' started by Max Burke, Sep 6, 2009.

  1. Max Burke

    Max Burke Guest

    For my new PC to run Windows 7 I've decided to build my own (since I
    cant find a ready built one that I like...)

    I've decided on the following:

    Mother board will be:
    Intel DX58SO X58 Chipset Socket 1366 SLI/Crossfire
    http://www.intel.com/products/desktop/motherboards/DX58SO/DX58SO-overview.htm

    CPU Will be:
    Intel Core i7 920 266GHz
    http://www.intel.com/products/processor/corei7/index.htm

    Memory will be:
    6GB (3x2GB)Corsair DDR3-1600 triple channel Ram kit

    Power Supply will be:
    Thermaltake 1200W Toughpower PSU

    Disk Drives (2x)
    Seagate 500GB SATA II/I 3GB/S (16MB cache)

    I was going with the following mid tower case:

    Thermaltake V9
    http://www.thermaltakeusa.com/Products.aspx?C=1390

    But several reviews I read say that the top of the case is only made of
    'flimsy' plastic and may be easily damaged...

    Also it doesn't have a removable/slide out motherboard chassis.

    My second choice is:
    Coolermaster Gladiator 600.
    http://www.coolermaster.com/product.php?product_id=6564

    Anyone have any other suggestions, comments?
    (the case in particular)

    All up it will cost $2,300 - $2,500 depending on where I buy...

    Already have keyboard/mouse, DVD drives, and LCD monitor.


    --

    Replace the obvious with paradise.net to email me
    Found Images
    http://homepages.paradise.net.nz/~mlvburke
    Max Burke, Sep 6, 2009
    #1
    1. Advertising

  2. Max Burke

    John Guest

    On Mon, 07 Sep 2009 01:54:45 +1200, Max Burke wrote:

    > For my new PC to run Windows 7 I've decided to build my own (since I
    > cant find a ready built one that I like...)
    >
    > I've decided on the following:
    >
    > Mother board will be:
    > Intel DX58SO X58 Chipset Socket 1366 SLI/Crossfire
    > http://www.intel.com/products/desktop/motherboards/DX58SO/DX58SO-overview.htm
    >
    > CPU Will be:
    > Intel Core i7 920 266GHz
    > http://www.intel.com/products/processor/corei7/index.htm
    >
    > Memory will be:
    > 6GB (3x2GB)Corsair DDR3-1600 triple channel Ram kit
    >
    > Power Supply will be:
    > Thermaltake 1200W Toughpower PSU
    >
    > Disk Drives (2x)
    > Seagate 500GB SATA II/I 3GB/S (16MB cache)
    >
    > I was going with the following mid tower case:
    >
    > Thermaltake V9
    > http://www.thermaltakeusa.com/Products.aspx?C=1390
    >
    > But several reviews I read say that the top of the case is only made of
    > 'flimsy' plastic and may be easily damaged...
    >
    > Also it doesn't have a removable/slide out motherboard chassis.
    >
    > My second choice is:
    > Coolermaster Gladiator 600.
    > http://www.coolermaster.com/product.php?product_id=6564
    >
    > Anyone have any other suggestions, comments?
    > (the case in particular)
    >
    > All up it will cost $2,300 - $2,500 depending on where I buy...
    >
    > Already have keyboard/mouse, DVD drives, and LCD monitor.


    Why not get Paradigm to build the computer to your specifications for
    just $60, not worth the hassle of building a machine for this price.
    Send Mark an email with the above specs and ask his advise.

    http://www.pp.co.nz/
    John, Sep 6, 2009
    #2
    1. Advertising

  3. Max Burke

    Nik Coughlin Guest

    "John" <> wrote in message
    news:3lk22cffvvvr.1i8nzpidf9o8h$...
    > On Mon, 07 Sep 2009 01:54:45 +1200, Max Burke wrote:
    >
    >> For my new PC to run Windows 7 I've decided to build my own (since I
    >> cant find a ready built one that I like...)
    >>

    > Why not get Paradigm to build the computer to your specifications for
    > just $60, not worth the hassle of building a machine for this price.
    > Send Mark an email with the above specs and ask his advise.


    Probably same reason I build my own computers, enjoy doing it.
    Nik Coughlin, Sep 6, 2009
    #3
  4. Max Burke

    Max Burke Guest

    John wrote:
    > On Mon, 07 Sep 2009 01:54:45 +1200, Max Burke wrote:
    >
    >> For my new PC to run Windows 7 I've decided to build my own (since I
    >> cant find a ready built one that I like...)
    >>
    >> I've decided on the following:
    >>
    >> Mother board will be:
    >> Intel DX58SO X58 Chipset Socket 1366 SLI/Crossfire
    >> http://www.intel.com/products/desktop/motherboards/DX58SO/DX58SO-overview.htm
    >>
    >> CPU Will be:
    >> Intel Core i7 920 266GHz
    >> http://www.intel.com/products/processor/corei7/index.htm
    >>
    >> Memory will be:
    >> 6GB (3x2GB)Corsair DDR3-1600 triple channel Ram kit
    >>
    >> Power Supply will be:
    >> Thermaltake 1200W Toughpower PSU
    >>
    >> Disk Drives (2x)
    >> Seagate 500GB SATA II/I 3GB/S (16MB cache)
    >>
    >> I was going with the following mid tower case:
    >>
    >> Thermaltake V9
    >> http://www.thermaltakeusa.com/Products.aspx?C=1390
    >>
    >> But several reviews I read say that the top of the case is only made of
    >> 'flimsy' plastic and may be easily damaged...
    >>
    >> Also it doesn't have a removable/slide out motherboard chassis.
    >>
    >> My second choice is:
    >> Coolermaster Gladiator 600.
    >> http://www.coolermaster.com/product.php?product_id=6564
    >>
    >> Anyone have any other suggestions, comments?
    >> (the case in particular)
    >>
    >> All up it will cost $2,300 - $2,500 depending on where I buy...
    >>
    >> Already have keyboard/mouse, DVD drives, and LCD monitor.

    >
    > Why not get Paradigm to build the computer to your specifications for
    > just $60, not worth the hassle of building a machine for this price.
    > Send Mark an email with the above specs and ask his advise.


    > http://www.pp.co.nz/


    Learning experience, not to save money.
    The same reason people build/modify cars...


    --

    Replace the obvious with paradise.net to email me
    Found Images
    http://homepages.paradise.net.nz/~mlvburke
    Max Burke, Sep 7, 2009
    #4
  5. Max Burke

    Max Burke Guest

    John wrote:
    > On Mon, 07 Sep 2009 01:54:45 +1200, Max Burke wrote:
    >
    >> For my new PC to run Windows 7 I've decided to build my own (since I
    >> cant find a ready built one that I like...)
    >>
    >> I've decided on the following:
    >>
    >> Mother board will be:
    >> Intel DX58SO X58 Chipset Socket 1366 SLI/Crossfire
    >> http://www.intel.com/products/desktop/motherboards/DX58SO/DX58SO-overview.htm
    >>
    >> CPU Will be:
    >> Intel Core i7 920 266GHz
    >> http://www.intel.com/products/processor/corei7/index.htm
    >>
    >> Memory will be:
    >> 6GB (3x2GB)Corsair DDR3-1600 triple channel Ram kit
    >>
    >> Power Supply will be:
    >> Thermaltake 1200W Toughpower PSU
    >>
    >> Disk Drives (2x)
    >> Seagate 500GB SATA II/I 3GB/S (16MB cache)
    >>
    >> I was going with the following mid tower case:
    >>
    >> Thermaltake V9
    >> http://www.thermaltakeusa.com/Products.aspx?C=1390
    >>
    >> But several reviews I read say that the top of the case is only made of
    >> 'flimsy' plastic and may be easily damaged...
    >>
    >> Also it doesn't have a removable/slide out motherboard chassis.
    >>
    >> My second choice is:
    >> Coolermaster Gladiator 600.
    >> http://www.coolermaster.com/product.php?product_id=6564
    >>
    >> Anyone have any other suggestions, comments?
    >> (the case in particular)
    >>
    >> All up it will cost $2,300 - $2,500 depending on where I buy...
    >>
    >> Already have keyboard/mouse, DVD drives, and LCD monitor.

    >
    > Why not get Paradigm to build the computer to your specifications for
    > just $60, not worth the hassle of building a machine for this price.
    > Send Mark an email with the above specs and ask his advise.
    >
    > http://www.pp.co.nz/


    According to their website they no longer assemble PCs.

    Prices are reasonable though.

    --

    Replace the obvious with paradise.net to email me
    Found Images
    http://homepages.paradise.net.nz/~mlvburke
    Max Burke, Sep 7, 2009
    #5
  6. On Mon, 07 Sep 2009 01:54:45 +1200, Max Burke
    <> wrote:

    >For my new PC to run Windows 7 I've decided to build my own (since I
    >cant find a ready built one that I like...)
    >
    >I've decided on the following:
    >
    >Mother board will be:
    >Intel DX58SO X58 Chipset Socket 1366 SLI/Crossfire
    >http://www.intel.com/products/desktop/motherboards/DX58SO/DX58SO-overview.htm
    >
    >CPU Will be:
    >Intel Core i7 920 266GHz
    >http://www.intel.com/products/processor/corei7/index.htm
    >
    >Memory will be:
    >6GB (3x2GB)Corsair DDR3-1600 triple channel Ram kit
    >
    >Power Supply will be:
    >Thermaltake 1200W Toughpower PSU


    That power supply looks like way overkill, unless you are planning
    having 3 or more massive SLI video cards. The latest round of
    hardware seems to be reducing the power requirements, not increasing
    them, except for top end video. If it is a real requirement, have you
    considered what a PC using 1200 W would put out into the room in the
    way of heat? That is a 1 bar heater you are talking about. For using
    that sort of power, you also need to do a budget on the electricity
    cost for a year. Of course, you probably will not need any extra
    heating in that room in winter, so you can subtract some for that.

    >Disk Drives (2x)
    >Seagate 500GB SATA II/I 3GB/S (16MB cache)
    >
    >I was going with the following mid tower case:
    >
    >Thermaltake V9
    >http://www.thermaltakeusa.com/Products.aspx?C=1390
    >
    >But several reviews I read say that the top of the case is only made of
    >'flimsy' plastic and may be easily damaged...
    >
    >Also it doesn't have a removable/slide out motherboard chassis.
    >
    >My second choice is:
    >Coolermaster Gladiator 600.
    >http://www.coolermaster.com/product.php?product_id=6564
    >
    >Anyone have any other suggestions, comments?
    >(the case in particular)
    >
    >All up it will cost $2,300 - $2,500 depending on where I buy...
    >
    >Already have keyboard/mouse, DVD drives, and LCD monitor.
    Stephen Worthington, Sep 7, 2009
    #6
  7. Max Burke

    John Guest

    On Mon, 07 Sep 2009 22:08:22 +1200, Max Burke wrote:

    > John wrote:
    >> On Mon, 07 Sep 2009 01:54:45 +1200, Max Burke wrote:
    >>
    >>> For my new PC to run Windows 7 I've decided to build my own (since I
    >>> cant find a ready built one that I like...)
    >>>
    >>> I've decided on the following:
    >>>
    >>> Mother board will be:
    >>> Intel DX58SO X58 Chipset Socket 1366 SLI/Crossfire
    >>> http://www.intel.com/products/desktop/motherboards/DX58SO/DX58SO-overview.htm
    >>>
    >>> CPU Will be:
    >>> Intel Core i7 920 266GHz
    >>> http://www.intel.com/products/processor/corei7/index.htm
    >>>
    >>> Memory will be:
    >>> 6GB (3x2GB)Corsair DDR3-1600 triple channel Ram kit
    >>>
    >>> Power Supply will be:
    >>> Thermaltake 1200W Toughpower PSU
    >>>
    >>> Disk Drives (2x)
    >>> Seagate 500GB SATA II/I 3GB/S (16MB cache)
    >>>
    >>> I was going with the following mid tower case:
    >>>
    >>> Thermaltake V9
    >>> http://www.thermaltakeusa.com/Products.aspx?C=1390
    >>>
    >>> But several reviews I read say that the top of the case is only made of
    >>> 'flimsy' plastic and may be easily damaged...
    >>>
    >>> Also it doesn't have a removable/slide out motherboard chassis.
    >>>
    >>> My second choice is:
    >>> Coolermaster Gladiator 600.
    >>> http://www.coolermaster.com/product.php?product_id=6564
    >>>
    >>> Anyone have any other suggestions, comments?
    >>> (the case in particular)
    >>>
    >>> All up it will cost $2,300 - $2,500 depending on where I buy...
    >>>
    >>> Already have keyboard/mouse, DVD drives, and LCD monitor.

    >>
    >> Why not get Paradigm to build the computer to your specifications for
    >> just $60, not worth the hassle of building a machine for this price.
    >> Send Mark an email with the above specs and ask his advise.

    >
    >> http://www.pp.co.nz/

    >
    > Learning experience, not to save money.
    > The same reason people build/modify cars...


    Fine, but that's not what you wrote in the original message, you
    wrote, and I'll quote:

    >(since I cant find a ready built one that I like...)


    This implies, at least to me, that the only reason you intend to build
    yourself was because you couldn't find a ready build machine with the
    specs you wanted, hence my suggestion in regards Paradigm.
    Surprised to hear they no longer build computers because they
    certainly did just s few weeks ago when I spoke to them.
    John, Sep 7, 2009
    #7
  8. On Tue, 08 Sep 2009 09:28:56 +1200, Allistar <> wrote:

    >Stephen Worthington wrote:
    >
    >> On Mon, 07 Sep 2009 01:54:45 +1200, Max Burke
    >> <> wrote:
    >>
    >>>For my new PC to run Windows 7 I've decided to build my own (since I
    >>>cant find a ready built one that I like...)
    >>>
    >>>I've decided on the following:
    >>>
    >>>Mother board will be:
    >>>Intel DX58SO X58 Chipset Socket 1366 SLI/Crossfire
    >>>http://www.intel.com/products/desktop/motherboards/DX58SO/DX58SO-overview.htm
    >>>
    >>>CPU Will be:
    >>>Intel Core i7 920 266GHz
    >>>http://www.intel.com/products/processor/corei7/index.htm
    >>>
    >>>Memory will be:
    >>>6GB (3x2GB)Corsair DDR3-1600 triple channel Ram kit
    >>>
    >>>Power Supply will be:
    >>>Thermaltake 1200W Toughpower PSU

    >>
    >> That power supply looks like way overkill, unless you are planning
    >> having 3 or more massive SLI video cards. The latest round of
    >> hardware seems to be reducing the power requirements, not increasing
    >> them, except for top end video. If it is a real requirement, have you
    >> considered what a PC using 1200 W would put out into the room in the
    >> way of heat? That is a 1 bar heater you are talking about. For using
    >> that sort of power, you also need to do a budget on the electricity
    >> cost for a year. Of course, you probably will not need any extra
    >> heating in that room in winter, so you can subtract some for that.

    >
    >Forgive my ignorance if I'm way off base here - being rated at 1200W doesn't
    >mean it will always draw 1200W does it? It just means that it *can* draw
    >that much if needed. Will a 1200W PSU use more kWh than a 400W PSU when
    >used on the same equipment for the same length of time?


    It might. Power supplies have an efficiency curve - they are most
    efficient in the middle of their curve, and less efficient at low
    output or highest output. If you have a 1200 W PS, and are only
    drawing 200 W typically, you may well be down the bottom of the
    efficiency curve and be drawing rather more power than a 400 W unit
    would be. A 1200 W PSU will be quite expensive, so there is no point
    in getting one if you only need 500 W. You do need a margin for the
    ability to upgrade a PC, but the only reason I can see for a 1200 W
    PSU is 3 or more very powerful graphics cards.

    I went to the Antec site and used their PSU calculator for a
    reasonable guess as to how this PC would be, using a pretty high spec
    video card, and it said a 504 W PSU would be all that was needed. That
    agrees with my guess that 500-600 W is what is needed for a good PC at
    the moment. The massive PSUs are really only for the seriously
    deranged gamer types with multiple video cards.
    Stephen Worthington, Sep 8, 2009
    #8
  9. Max Burke

    Max Burke Guest

    Stephen Worthington wrote:
    > On Mon, 07 Sep 2009 01:54:45 +1200, Max Burke
    > <> wrote:
    >
    >> For my new PC to run Windows 7 I've decided to build my own (since I
    >> cant find a ready built one that I like...)
    >>
    >> I've decided on the following:
    >>
    >> Mother board will be:
    >> Intel DX58SO X58 Chipset Socket 1366 SLI/Crossfire
    >> http://www.intel.com/products/desktop/motherboards/DX58SO/DX58SO-overview.htm


    Scrub that one (limited memory slots, and probles when using large
    graphics cards can block some of the SATA connectors on the MB, this
    Gigabyte one looks more suitable.
    http://www.gigabyte.com.tw/Products/Motherboard/Products_Overview.aspx?ProductID=2986


    >> CPU Will be:
    >> Intel Core i7 920 266GHz
    >> http://www.intel.com/products/processor/corei7/index.htm


    >> Memory will be:
    >> 6GB (3x2GB)Corsair DDR3-1600 triple channel Ram kit


    >> Power Supply will be:
    >> Thermaltake 1200W Toughpower PSU


    > That power supply looks like way overkill, unless you are planning
    > having 3 or more massive SLI video cards. The latest round of
    > hardware seems to be reducing the power requirements, not increasing
    > them, except for top end video. If it is a real requirement, have you
    > considered what a PC using 1200 W would put out into the room in the
    > way of heat? That is a 1 bar heater you are talking about. For using
    > that sort of power, you also need to do a budget on the electricity
    > cost for a year. Of course, you probably will not need any extra
    > heating in that room in winter, so you can subtract some for that.


    Yeah I'm beginning to think maybe it is as well.

    >> Disk Drives (2x)
    >> Seagate 500GB SATA II/I 3GB/S (16MB cache)


    >> I was going with the following mid tower case:


    >> Thermaltake V9
    >> http://www.thermaltakeusa.com/Products.aspx?C=1390
    >>
    >> But several reviews I read say that the top of the case is only made of
    >> 'flimsy' plastic and may be easily damaged...


    >> Also it doesn't have a removable/slide out motherboard chassis.


    >> My second choice is:
    >> Coolermaster Gladiator 600.
    >> http://www.coolermaster.com/product.php?product_id=6564


    >> Anyone have any other suggestions, comments?
    >> (the case in particular)


    >> All up it will cost $2,300 - $2,500 depending on where I buy...


    >> Already have keyboard/mouse, DVD drives, and LCD monitor.



    --

    Replace the obvious with paradise.net to email me
    Found Images
    http://homepages.paradise.net.nz/~mlvburke
    Max Burke, Sep 8, 2009
    #9
  10. Max Burke

    Max Burke Guest

    John wrote:
    > On Mon, 07 Sep 2009 22:08:22 +1200, Max Burke wrote:
    >
    >> John wrote:
    >>> On Mon, 07 Sep 2009 01:54:45 +1200, Max Burke wrote:
    >>>
    >>>> For my new PC to run Windows 7 I've decided to build my own (since I
    >>>> cant find a ready built one that I like...)
    >>>>
    >>>> I've decided on the following:
    >>>>
    >>>> Mother board will be:
    >>>> Intel DX58SO X58 Chipset Socket 1366 SLI/Crossfire
    >>>> http://www.intel.com/products/desktop/motherboards/DX58SO/DX58SO-overview.htm
    >>>>
    >>>> CPU Will be:
    >>>> Intel Core i7 920 266GHz
    >>>> http://www.intel.com/products/processor/corei7/index.htm
    >>>>
    >>>> Memory will be:
    >>>> 6GB (3x2GB)Corsair DDR3-1600 triple channel Ram kit
    >>>>
    >>>> Power Supply will be:
    >>>> Thermaltake 1200W Toughpower PSU
    >>>>
    >>>> Disk Drives (2x)
    >>>> Seagate 500GB SATA II/I 3GB/S (16MB cache)
    >>>>
    >>>> I was going with the following mid tower case:
    >>>>
    >>>> Thermaltake V9
    >>>> http://www.thermaltakeusa.com/Products.aspx?C=1390
    >>>>
    >>>> But several reviews I read say that the top of the case is only made of
    >>>> 'flimsy' plastic and may be easily damaged...
    >>>>
    >>>> Also it doesn't have a removable/slide out motherboard chassis.
    >>>>
    >>>> My second choice is:
    >>>> Coolermaster Gladiator 600.
    >>>> http://www.coolermaster.com/product.php?product_id=6564
    >>>>
    >>>> Anyone have any other suggestions, comments?
    >>>> (the case in particular)
    >>>>
    >>>> All up it will cost $2,300 - $2,500 depending on where I buy...
    >>>>
    >>>> Already have keyboard/mouse, DVD drives, and LCD monitor.
    >>> Why not get Paradigm to build the computer to your specifications for
    >>> just $60, not worth the hassle of building a machine for this price.
    >>> Send Mark an email with the above specs and ask his advise.
    >>> http://www.pp.co.nz/

    >> Learning experience, not to save money.
    >> The same reason people build/modify cars...

    >
    > Fine, but that's not what you wrote in the original message, you
    > wrote, and I'll quote:
    >
    >> (since I cant find a ready built one that I like...)

    >
    > This implies, at least to me, that the only reason you intend to build
    > yourself was because you couldn't find a ready build machine with the
    > specs you wanted, hence my suggestion in regards Paradigm.
    > Surprised to hear they no longer build computers because they
    > certainly did just s few weeks ago when I spoke to them.


    On their PC Wizard page where you can 'design your own' they have in the
    Toy Box:
    Max Burke, Sep 8, 2009
    #10
  11. Max Burke

    thingy Guest

    On Sep 7, 1:54 am, Max Burke <> wrote:
    > For my new PC to run Windows 7 I've decided to build my own (since I
    > cant find a ready built one that I like...)



    Hi,

    If it was me I'd look at someone like pp.co.nz who will assemble the
    bits you want for I think about $75~$100......saves lots of hassle and
    risk of static damage....etc...etc.....

    regards

    Thing
    thingy, Sep 8, 2009
    #11
  12. On Tue, 8 Sep 2009 13:29:20 -0700 (PDT), thingy <>
    wrote in
    <news:>:

    > On Sep 7, 1:54 am, Max Burke <> wrote:
    >> For my new PC to run Windows 7 I've decided to build my own (since I
    >> cant find a ready built one that I like...)

    >
    > Hi,
    >
    > If it was me I'd look at someone like pp.co.nz who will assemble the
    > bits you want for I think about $75~$100......saves lots of hassle and
    > risk of static damage....etc...etc.....


    Not no mo', dey don't.

    --
    - Nicolaas
    Nicolaas Hawkins, Sep 8, 2009
    #12
  13. Max Burke

    ~misfit~ Guest

    Somewhere on teh intarwebs Stephen Worthington wrote:
    > On Tue, 08 Sep 2009 09:28:56 +1200, Allistar <> wrote:
    >> Forgive my ignorance if I'm way off base here - being rated at 1200W
    >> doesn't mean it will always draw 1200W does it? It just means that
    >> it *can* draw that much if needed. Will a 1200W PSU use more kWh
    >> than a 400W PSU when used on the same equipment for the same length
    >> of time?

    >
    > It might. Power supplies have an efficiency curve - they are most
    > efficient in the middle of their curve, and less efficient at low
    > output or highest output.


    I'm sorry Stephen, I have to take issue with this statement. I've done a lot
    of research into PSUs and, from the available data, they all seem to vary as
    far as to where they are most efficient on their output curve. In fact most
    (but not all) seem to be at their best at between 20% and 50% of rated load
    from memory.

    This site is very good, especially if they have reviewed the PSU you are
    thinking of buying:
    http://www.hardwaresecrets.com/page/power

    I checked and they haven't reviewed the Tt ToughPower 1200W unfortunately.
    However, as an example I clicked on several of their latest reviews (ones
    that I've not seen before as I've not been there recently).

    Hmmm, it seems that your statement wasn't that far off. Going by their
    efficiency tests that I just saw all the PSUs that I looked at were best at
    40% (they test at 20%, 40%, 60%, 80% and 100%, hard to know whether the peak
    of the efficency curve is above or below the 40% mark...). I seem to
    remember in the past some PSUs that did better at 20% but I'm not going
    through every (very thourough) review that they've done.

    Going by their current data it seems that getting a PSU that is rated for
    250% of your likely load would give best efficiency.

    > If you have a 1200 W PS, and are only
    > drawing 200 W typically, you may well be down the bottom of the
    > efficiency curve and be drawing rather more power than a 400 W unit
    > would be. A 1200 W PSU will be quite expensive, so there is no point
    > in getting one if you only need 500 W. You do need a margin for the
    > ability to upgrade a PC, but the only reason I can see for a 1200 W
    > PSU is 3 or more very powerful graphics cards.
    >
    > I went to the Antec site and used their PSU calculator for a
    > reasonable guess as to how this PC would be, using a pretty high spec
    > video card, and it said a 504 W PSU would be all that was needed. That
    > agrees with my guess that 500-600 W is what is needed for a good PC at
    > the moment.


    Although most PSU's efficiency curves are dropping off at the top end of
    their rated output. When I bought my last PSU I calculated the approximate
    power draw of my machine and then doubled it and added a bit more. It runs a
    700W PSU.

    > The massive PSUs are really only for the seriously
    > deranged gamer types with multiple video cards.


    Yeah, and bragging rights. <g>

    Other good PSU sites:
    http://www.jonnyguru.com/
    http://www.mepislovers.org/forums/showthread.php?t=12454
    http://www.xtremesystems.org/forums/showthread.php?t=108088
    (Although Hardware secrets and JonnyGuru are the best.)

    Some sites for calculating your PC's power draw:
    http://www.extreme.outervision.com/psucalculatorlite.jsp
    http://www.adecy.com/psu/
    http://www.journeysystems.com/?power_supply_calculator
    http://www.schrockinnovations.com/powercalc.php
    http://web.archive.org/web/20040411032947/http://www.takaman.jp/psu_calc.html?english
    http://www.vbutils.com/power.asp
    http://web.aanet.com.au/SnooP/psucalc.php
    I don't know how many of those are current, it's been a while since I've had
    need for them having migrated to mainly ThinkPads a while back. I just have
    a couple desktops now.

    Anyway, it seems you weren't that far off although, from an efficiency
    viewpoint I'd aim at the 40% mark rather than the 50% one. :)
    Also pays to remember that not all PSU are created equally. Some cheaper one
    only manage 80% or less of their rated output.

    Cheers,
    --
    Shaun.

    "Give a man a fire and he's warm for the day. But set fire to him and he's
    warm for the rest of his life." Terry Pratchet, 'Jingo'.
    ~misfit~, Sep 9, 2009
    #13
  14. Max Burke

    John Guest

    On Tue, 08 Sep 2009 22:43:53 +1200, Max Burke wrote:


    > On their PC Wizard page where you can 'design your own' they have in the
    > Toy Box:
    >
    John, Sep 9, 2009
    #14
  15. Max Burke

    impossible Guest

    "Allistar" <> wrote in message
    news:...
    > Stephen Worthington wrote:
    >
    >> On Tue, 08 Sep 2009 09:28:56 +1200, Allistar <> wrote:
    >>
    >>>Stephen Worthington wrote:
    >>>
    >>>> On Mon, 07 Sep 2009 01:54:45 +1200, Max Burke
    >>>> <> wrote:
    >>>>
    >>>>>For my new PC to run Windows 7 I've decided to build my own (since I
    >>>>>cant find a ready built one that I like...)
    >>>>>
    >>>>>I've decided on the following:
    >>>>>
    >>>>>Mother board will be:
    >>>>>Intel DX58SO X58 Chipset Socket 1366 SLI/Crossfire
    >>>>>http://www.intel.com/products/desktop/motherboards/DX58SO/DX58SO-overview.htm
    >>>>>
    >>>>>CPU Will be:
    >>>>>Intel Core i7 920 266GHz
    >>>>>http://www.intel.com/products/processor/corei7/index.htm
    >>>>>
    >>>>>Memory will be:
    >>>>>6GB (3x2GB)Corsair DDR3-1600 triple channel Ram kit
    >>>>>
    >>>>>Power Supply will be:
    >>>>>Thermaltake 1200W Toughpower PSU
    >>>>
    >>>> That power supply looks like way overkill, unless you are planning
    >>>> having 3 or more massive SLI video cards. The latest round of
    >>>> hardware seems to be reducing the power requirements, not increasing
    >>>> them, except for top end video. If it is a real requirement, have you
    >>>> considered what a PC using 1200 W would put out into the room in the
    >>>> way of heat? That is a 1 bar heater you are talking about. For using
    >>>> that sort of power, you also need to do a budget on the electricity
    >>>> cost for a year. Of course, you probably will not need any extra
    >>>> heating in that room in winter, so you can subtract some for that.
    >>>
    >>>Forgive my ignorance if I'm way off base here - being rated at 1200W
    >>>doesn't mean it will always draw 1200W does it? It just means that it
    >>>*can* draw that much if needed. Will a 1200W PSU use more kWh than a 400W
    >>>PSU when used on the same equipment for the same length of time?

    >>
    >> It might. Power supplies have an efficiency curve - they are most
    >> efficient in the middle of their curve, and less efficient at low
    >> output or highest output. If you have a 1200 W PS, and are only
    >> drawing 200 W typically, you may well be down the bottom of the
    >> efficiency curve and be drawing rather more power than a 400 W unit
    >> would be. A 1200 W PSU will be quite expensive, so there is no point
    >> in getting one if you only need 500 W. You do need a margin for the
    >> ability to upgrade a PC, but the only reason I can see for a 1200 W
    >> PSU is 3 or more very powerful graphics cards.
    >>
    >> I went to the Antec site and used their PSU calculator for a
    >> reasonable guess as to how this PC would be, using a pretty high spec
    >> video card, and it said a 504 W PSU would be all that was needed. That
    >> agrees with my guess that 500-600 W is what is needed for a good PC at
    >> the moment. The massive PSUs are really only for the seriously
    >> deranged gamer types with multiple video cards.

    >
    > When I built my current PC a couple of years ago I went by the very rough
    > rule of thumb of 100W per "device" (HDD, video card etc). I have 2 video
    > cards (I run a triple head setup), a QX6700 cpu which is quite power
    > hungry
    > and 6 HDDs. From memory I went with a 1000W PSU.
    > --


    Try this next tiume:

    http://extreme.outervision.com/PSUEngine

    500w would have been more than adequate for you.
    impossible, Sep 10, 2009
    #15
  16. On Fri, 11 Sep 2009 10:50:14 +1200, Allistar <> wrote:

    >impossible wrote:
    >
    >>
    >> "Allistar" <> wrote in message
    >> news:...
    >>> Stephen Worthington wrote:
    >>>
    >>>> On Tue, 08 Sep 2009 09:28:56 +1200, Allistar <> wrote:
    >>>>
    >>>>>Stephen Worthington wrote:
    >>>>>
    >>>>>> On Mon, 07 Sep 2009 01:54:45 +1200, Max Burke
    >>>>>> <> wrote:
    >>>>>>
    >>>>>>>For my new PC to run Windows 7 I've decided to build my own (since I
    >>>>>>>cant find a ready built one that I like...)
    >>>>>>>
    >>>>>>>I've decided on the following:
    >>>>>>>
    >>>>>>>Mother board will be:
    >>>>>>>Intel DX58SO X58 Chipset Socket 1366 SLI/Crossfire
    >>>>>>>http://www.intel.com/products/desktop/motherboards/DX58SO/DX58SO-overview.htm
    >>>>>>>
    >>>>>>>CPU Will be:
    >>>>>>>Intel Core i7 920 266GHz
    >>>>>>>http://www.intel.com/products/processor/corei7/index.htm
    >>>>>>>
    >>>>>>>Memory will be:
    >>>>>>>6GB (3x2GB)Corsair DDR3-1600 triple channel Ram kit
    >>>>>>>
    >>>>>>>Power Supply will be:
    >>>>>>>Thermaltake 1200W Toughpower PSU
    >>>>>>
    >>>>>> That power supply looks like way overkill, unless you are planning
    >>>>>> having 3 or more massive SLI video cards. The latest round of
    >>>>>> hardware seems to be reducing the power requirements, not increasing
    >>>>>> them, except for top end video. If it is a real requirement, have you
    >>>>>> considered what a PC using 1200 W would put out into the room in the
    >>>>>> way of heat? That is a 1 bar heater you are talking about. For using
    >>>>>> that sort of power, you also need to do a budget on the electricity
    >>>>>> cost for a year. Of course, you probably will not need any extra
    >>>>>> heating in that room in winter, so you can subtract some for that.
    >>>>>
    >>>>>Forgive my ignorance if I'm way off base here - being rated at 1200W
    >>>>>doesn't mean it will always draw 1200W does it? It just means that it
    >>>>>*can* draw that much if needed. Will a 1200W PSU use more kWh than a
    >>>>>400W PSU when used on the same equipment for the same length of time?
    >>>>
    >>>> It might. Power supplies have an efficiency curve - they are most
    >>>> efficient in the middle of their curve, and less efficient at low
    >>>> output or highest output. If you have a 1200 W PS, and are only
    >>>> drawing 200 W typically, you may well be down the bottom of the
    >>>> efficiency curve and be drawing rather more power than a 400 W unit
    >>>> would be. A 1200 W PSU will be quite expensive, so there is no point
    >>>> in getting one if you only need 500 W. You do need a margin for the
    >>>> ability to upgrade a PC, but the only reason I can see for a 1200 W
    >>>> PSU is 3 or more very powerful graphics cards.
    >>>>
    >>>> I went to the Antec site and used their PSU calculator for a
    >>>> reasonable guess as to how this PC would be, using a pretty high spec
    >>>> video card, and it said a 504 W PSU would be all that was needed. That
    >>>> agrees with my guess that 500-600 W is what is needed for a good PC at
    >>>> the moment. The massive PSUs are really only for the seriously
    >>>> deranged gamer types with multiple video cards.
    >>>
    >>> When I built my current PC a couple of years ago I went by the very rough
    >>> rule of thumb of 100W per "device" (HDD, video card etc). I have 2 video
    >>> cards (I run a triple head setup), a QX6700 cpu which is quite power
    >>> hungry
    >>> and 6 HDDs. From memory I went with a 1000W PSU.
    >>> --

    >>
    >> Try this next tiume:
    >>
    >> http://extreme.outervision.com/PSUEngine
    >>
    >> 500w would have been more than adequate for you.

    >
    >Interesting, thanks. There's no harm in having a power supply that is
    >beafier than one needs is there?


    Except for the lower efficiency and the cost, no.
    Stephen Worthington, Sep 11, 2009
    #16
  17. Max Burke

    impossible Guest

    "Allistar" <> wrote in message
    news:...
    > impossible wrote:
    >
    >>
    >> "Allistar" <> wrote in message
    >> news:...
    >>> Stephen Worthington wrote:
    >>>
    >>>> On Tue, 08 Sep 2009 09:28:56 +1200, Allistar <> wrote:
    >>>>
    >>>>>Stephen Worthington wrote:
    >>>>>
    >>>>>> On Mon, 07 Sep 2009 01:54:45 +1200, Max Burke
    >>>>>> <> wrote:
    >>>>>>
    >>>>>>>For my new PC to run Windows 7 I've decided to build my own (since I
    >>>>>>>cant find a ready built one that I like...)
    >>>>>>>
    >>>>>>>I've decided on the following:
    >>>>>>>
    >>>>>>>Mother board will be:
    >>>>>>>Intel DX58SO X58 Chipset Socket 1366 SLI/Crossfire
    >>>>>>>http://www.intel.com/products/desktop/motherboards/DX58SO/DX58SO-overview.htm
    >>>>>>>
    >>>>>>>CPU Will be:
    >>>>>>>Intel Core i7 920 266GHz
    >>>>>>>http://www.intel.com/products/processor/corei7/index.htm
    >>>>>>>
    >>>>>>>Memory will be:
    >>>>>>>6GB (3x2GB)Corsair DDR3-1600 triple channel Ram kit
    >>>>>>>
    >>>>>>>Power Supply will be:
    >>>>>>>Thermaltake 1200W Toughpower PSU
    >>>>>>
    >>>>>> That power supply looks like way overkill, unless you are planning
    >>>>>> having 3 or more massive SLI video cards. The latest round of
    >>>>>> hardware seems to be reducing the power requirements, not increasing
    >>>>>> them, except for top end video. If it is a real requirement, have
    >>>>>> you
    >>>>>> considered what a PC using 1200 W would put out into the room in the
    >>>>>> way of heat? That is a 1 bar heater you are talking about. For
    >>>>>> using
    >>>>>> that sort of power, you also need to do a budget on the electricity
    >>>>>> cost for a year. Of course, you probably will not need any extra
    >>>>>> heating in that room in winter, so you can subtract some for that.
    >>>>>
    >>>>>Forgive my ignorance if I'm way off base here - being rated at 1200W
    >>>>>doesn't mean it will always draw 1200W does it? It just means that it
    >>>>>*can* draw that much if needed. Will a 1200W PSU use more kWh than a
    >>>>>400W PSU when used on the same equipment for the same length of time?
    >>>>
    >>>> It might. Power supplies have an efficiency curve - they are most
    >>>> efficient in the middle of their curve, and less efficient at low
    >>>> output or highest output. If you have a 1200 W PS, and are only
    >>>> drawing 200 W typically, you may well be down the bottom of the
    >>>> efficiency curve and be drawing rather more power than a 400 W unit
    >>>> would be. A 1200 W PSU will be quite expensive, so there is no point
    >>>> in getting one if you only need 500 W. You do need a margin for the
    >>>> ability to upgrade a PC, but the only reason I can see for a 1200 W
    >>>> PSU is 3 or more very powerful graphics cards.
    >>>>
    >>>> I went to the Antec site and used their PSU calculator for a
    >>>> reasonable guess as to how this PC would be, using a pretty high spec
    >>>> video card, and it said a 504 W PSU would be all that was needed. That
    >>>> agrees with my guess that 500-600 W is what is needed for a good PC at
    >>>> the moment. The massive PSUs are really only for the seriously
    >>>> deranged gamer types with multiple video cards.
    >>>
    >>> When I built my current PC a couple of years ago I went by the very
    >>> rough
    >>> rule of thumb of 100W per "device" (HDD, video card etc). I have 2 video
    >>> cards (I run a triple head setup), a QX6700 cpu which is quite power
    >>> hungry
    >>> and 6 HDDs. From memory I went with a 1000W PSU.
    >>> --

    >>
    >> Try this next tiume:
    >>
    >> http://extreme.outervision.com/PSUEngine
    >>
    >> 500w would have been more than adequate for you.

    >
    > Interesting, thanks. There's no harm in having a power supply that is
    > beafier than one needs is there?
    > --


    Only to your wallet. Though of course if you then use your misinformed
    rule-of-thumb to advise others on what to buy, the harm could begin to
    multiply.
    impossible, Sep 12, 2009
    #17
  18. Max Burke

    impossible Guest

    "Allistar" <> wrote in message
    news:...
    > impossible wrote:
    >
    >>
    >> "Allistar" <> wrote in message
    >> news:...
    >>> impossible wrote:
    >>>
    >>>>
    >>>> "Allistar" <> wrote in message
    >>>> news:...
    >>>>> Stephen Worthington wrote:
    >>>>>
    >>>>>> On Tue, 08 Sep 2009 09:28:56 +1200, Allistar <> wrote:
    >>>>>>
    >>>>>>>Stephen Worthington wrote:
    >>>>>>>
    >>>>>>>> On Mon, 07 Sep 2009 01:54:45 +1200, Max Burke
    >>>>>>>> <> wrote:
    >>>>>>>>
    >>>>>>>>>For my new PC to run Windows 7 I've decided to build my own (since
    >>>>>>>>>I
    >>>>>>>>>cant find a ready built one that I like...)
    >>>>>>>>>
    >>>>>>>>>I've decided on the following:
    >>>>>>>>>
    >>>>>>>>>Mother board will be:
    >>>>>>>>>Intel DX58SO X58 Chipset Socket 1366 SLI/Crossfire
    >>>>>>>>>http://www.intel.com/products/desktop/motherboards/DX58SO/DX58SO-overview.htm
    >>>>>>>>>
    >>>>>>>>>CPU Will be:
    >>>>>>>>>Intel Core i7 920 266GHz
    >>>>>>>>>http://www.intel.com/products/processor/corei7/index.htm
    >>>>>>>>>
    >>>>>>>>>Memory will be:
    >>>>>>>>>6GB (3x2GB)Corsair DDR3-1600 triple channel Ram kit
    >>>>>>>>>
    >>>>>>>>>Power Supply will be:
    >>>>>>>>>Thermaltake 1200W Toughpower PSU
    >>>>>>>>
    >>>>>>>> That power supply looks like way overkill, unless you are planning
    >>>>>>>> having 3 or more massive SLI video cards. The latest round of
    >>>>>>>> hardware seems to be reducing the power requirements, not
    >>>>>>>> increasing
    >>>>>>>> them, except for top end video. If it is a real requirement, have
    >>>>>>>> you
    >>>>>>>> considered what a PC using 1200 W would put out into the room in
    >>>>>>>> the
    >>>>>>>> way of heat? That is a 1 bar heater you are talking about. For
    >>>>>>>> using
    >>>>>>>> that sort of power, you also need to do a budget on the electricity
    >>>>>>>> cost for a year. Of course, you probably will not need any extra
    >>>>>>>> heating in that room in winter, so you can subtract some for that.
    >>>>>>>
    >>>>>>>Forgive my ignorance if I'm way off base here - being rated at 1200W
    >>>>>>>doesn't mean it will always draw 1200W does it? It just means that it
    >>>>>>>*can* draw that much if needed. Will a 1200W PSU use more kWh than a
    >>>>>>>400W PSU when used on the same equipment for the same length of time?
    >>>>>>
    >>>>>> It might. Power supplies have an efficiency curve - they are most
    >>>>>> efficient in the middle of their curve, and less efficient at low
    >>>>>> output or highest output. If you have a 1200 W PS, and are only
    >>>>>> drawing 200 W typically, you may well be down the bottom of the
    >>>>>> efficiency curve and be drawing rather more power than a 400 W unit
    >>>>>> would be. A 1200 W PSU will be quite expensive, so there is no point
    >>>>>> in getting one if you only need 500 W. You do need a margin for the
    >>>>>> ability to upgrade a PC, but the only reason I can see for a 1200 W
    >>>>>> PSU is 3 or more very powerful graphics cards.
    >>>>>>
    >>>>>> I went to the Antec site and used their PSU calculator for a
    >>>>>> reasonable guess as to how this PC would be, using a pretty high spec
    >>>>>> video card, and it said a 504 W PSU would be all that was needed.
    >>>>>> That
    >>>>>> agrees with my guess that 500-600 W is what is needed for a good PC
    >>>>>> at
    >>>>>> the moment. The massive PSUs are really only for the seriously
    >>>>>> deranged gamer types with multiple video cards.
    >>>>>
    >>>>> When I built my current PC a couple of years ago I went by the very
    >>>>> rough
    >>>>> rule of thumb of 100W per "device" (HDD, video card etc). I have 2
    >>>>> video cards (I run a triple head setup), a QX6700 cpu which is quite
    >>>>> power hungry
    >>>>> and 6 HDDs. From memory I went with a 1000W PSU.
    >>>>> --
    >>>>
    >>>> Try this next tiume:
    >>>>
    >>>> http://extreme.outervision.com/PSUEngine
    >>>>
    >>>> 500w would have been more than adequate for you.
    >>>
    >>> Interesting, thanks. There's no harm in having a power supply that is
    >>> beafier than one needs is there?

    >>
    >> Only to your wallet. Though of course if you then use your misinformed
    >> rule-of-thumb to advise others on what to buy, the harm could begin to
    >> multiply.

    >
    > I don't mind the additional cost of a beafier PSU consider the PC itself
    > came to about $4G when I bought it.
    > --


    Wasting money is never smart.
    impossible, Sep 14, 2009
    #18
  19. In article <>,
    says...
    >
    > impossible wrote:
    > > "Allistar" <> wrote in message

    >
    > >> I don't mind the additional cost of a beafier PSU consider the
    > >> PC
    > >> itself came to about $4G when I bought it.
    > >> --

    > >
    > > Wasting money is never smart.

    >
    > How boring. Don't you ever have any fun?
    >
    > Perhaps you'd care to define what you mean, exactly, by waste?


    Haha, that's the point in question, isn't it? I mean, my neighbour buys
    a $30 cordless drill at the warehouse and I buy a $500 cordless drill in
    a specialist tool store.

    Which one of us is wasting money? Opinions may differ, as does the
    mileage.

    -P.
    Peter Huebner, Sep 14, 2009
    #19
  20. Max Burke

    impossible Guest

    "WorkHard" <> wrote in message
    news:...

    > impossible wrote:
    >>>>>>> "Allistar" <> wrote in message
    >>>>>>>
    >>>>>>> When I built my current PC a couple of years ago I went by the very
    >>>>>>> rough
    >>>>>>> rule of thumb of 100W per "device" (HDD, video card etc). I have 2
    >>>>>>> video cards (I run a triple head setup), a QX6700 cpu which is quite
    >>>>>>> power hungry
    >>>>>>> and 6 HDDs. From memory I went with a 1000W PSU.
    >>>>>>> --
    >>>>>>
    >>>>>> Try this next tiume:
    >>>>>>
    >>>>>> http://extreme.outervision.com/PSUEngine
    >>>>>>
    >>>>>> 500w would have been more than adequate for you.
    >>>>>
    >>>>> Interesting, thanks. There's no harm in having a power supply that is
    >>>>> beafier than one needs is there?
    >>>>
    >>>> Only to your wallet. Though of course if you then use your misinformed
    >>>> rule-of-thumb to advise others on what to buy, the harm could begin to
    >>>> multiply.
    >>>
    >>> I don't mind the additional cost of a beafier PSU consider the PC itself
    >>> came to about $4G when I bought it.
    >>> --

    >>
    >> Wasting money is never smart.

    >
    > How boring. Don't you ever have any fun?
    >
    > Perhaps you'd care to define what you mean, exactly, by waste?
    >


    <shakes head>

    (1) Waste -- as in it's a waste of time for me to have to undelete the
    answer to your question that you deleted from my prior post.

    (2) Waste -- as in buying a power supply that is more than twice the
    capacity needed just to show off. How boring.
    impossible, Sep 14, 2009
    #20
    1. Advertising

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