Networking Woosh

Discussion in 'NZ Computing' started by hog.badger@mbox.bol.bg, Nov 1, 2005.

  1. Guest

    My home network has 3 machines .. one each of WinXP, Win2K and Win98SE
    a Dick Smith's router.

    And I have not been able to figure out how to share my Woosh modem.
    Share, that is, in that more than one machine could use it at a time.
    They can all use it, but not concurrently.

    Is there any way to do this. Maybe by using two network cards in one
    machine and connecting the modem to one of them rather than to the
    router.

    Possibly, the Win98 machine could be converted to Linux. But I don't
    want to do this unless it is really necessary.

    Thanks
    , Nov 1, 2005
    #1
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  2. wrote:
    > My home network has 3 machines .. one each of WinXP, Win2K and Win98SE
    > a Dick Smith's router.
    >
    > And I have not been able to figure out how to share my Woosh modem.
    > Share, that is, in that more than one machine could use it at a time.
    > They can all use it, but not concurrently.
    >
    > Is there any way to do this. Maybe by using two network cards in one
    > machine and connecting the modem to one of them rather than to the
    > router.
    >
    > Possibly, the Win98 machine could be converted to Linux. But I don't
    > want to do this unless it is really necessary.


    Plug the Woosh modem into one of the machines (probably the XP machine)
    and run Internet Connection Sharing wizard, it will share out the Woosh
    modem and the LAN card will dishing out DHCP address to the other 2
    machines.

    This will work over the Woosh with USB, but more reliably if you get a
    2nd LAN card and get the ethernet adapter for the Woosh modem
    Nathan Mercer, Nov 1, 2005
    #2
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  3. In <> hog.badger@
    mbox.bol.bg wrote:
    > My home network has 3 machines .. one each of WinXP, Win2K and Win98SE
    > a Dick Smith's router.
    >
    > And I have not been able to figure out how to share my Woosh modem.
    > Share, that is, in that more than one machine could use it at a time.
    > They can all use it, but not concurrently.
    >
    > Is there any way to do this. Maybe by using two network cards in one
    > machine and connecting the modem to one of them rather than to the
    > router.
    >
    > Possibly, the Win98 machine could be converted to Linux. But I don't
    > want to do this unless it is really necessary.


    How do you have them connected now?

    I have a Woosh modem shared via a Dick Smith broadband router. It has a
    seperate WAN port for the Internet connection. The Woosh modem connects
    to the WAN port via the optional Ethernet cable and the router takes
    care of connecting to the Woosh network. The computers connect to the
    LAN ports on the router.

    --
    Roger Johnstone, Invercargill, New Zealand
    http://roger.geek.nz/
    ________________________________________________________________________
    No Silicon Heaven? Preposterous! Where would all the calculators go?

    Kryten, from the Red Dwarf episode "The Last Day"
    Roger Johnstone, Nov 1, 2005
    #3
  4. Guest

    Thanks Roger. That's what I've got, but can only use one machine at a
    time on the modem. You have simultaneous use?
    , Nov 1, 2005
    #4
  5. steve Guest

    wrote:

    > Possibly, the Win98 machine could be converted to Linux. But I don't
    > want to do this unless it is really necessary.


    You want the PC connected to the modem to have a second network card which
    is connected to a LAN hub.

    You want that same PC to be able to function as a router / firewall.

    Linux does it. I used to do exactly this with TelstraClear cable.

    It took a bit of reading and thinking to get it going in 1998....but once
    done, it did the job 24/7 for 5 years.

    It would likely be much easier to do now.
    steve, Nov 1, 2005
    #5
  6. steve Guest

    Roger Johnstone wrote:

    > How do you have them connected now?
    >
    > I have a Woosh modem shared via a Dick Smith broadband router. It has a
    > seperate WAN port for the Internet connection. The Woosh modem connects
    > to the WAN port via the optional Ethernet cable and the router takes
    > care of connecting to the Woosh network. The computers connect to the
    > LAN ports on the router.


    That's an even better way to go.

    Good suggestion.
    steve, Nov 1, 2005
    #6
  7. Guest

    > Thanks Roger. That's what I've got, but can only use one machine
    > at a time on the modem. You have simultaneous use?


    Oops, Roger no. I lie. My modem was connected to a LAN port on the
    router, and I haven't been able to access the modem at all when it is
    plugged into the WAN port. Is there some sort of secret?
    , Nov 1, 2005
    #7
  8. wrote:
    >>Thanks Roger. That's what I've got, but can only use one machine
    >>at a time on the modem. You have simultaneous use?

    >
    >
    > Oops, Roger no. I lie. My modem was connected to a LAN port on the
    > router, and I haven't been able to access the modem at all when it is
    > plugged into the WAN port. Is there some sort of secret?
    >


    I'm not familiar with that router, but as a general idea, you want to configure
    it to work as a NAT device, creating a local subnet (on 192.168.some.thing or
    10.so.me.th.ing) tragffic from which is forwarded to the wider network through
    the WAN port.

    It's probably easier to use DHCP on the local LAN subnet, but I tend to use
    fixed addresses.

    If that doesn't work, give us a bit of a rundown on the way the router is
    configured, and someone will probably be able to let you know what to mess with.
    Mark Robinson, Nov 1, 2005
    #8
  9. In article <>,
    wrote:

    > > Thanks Roger. That's what I've got, but can only use one machine
    > > at a time on the modem. You have simultaneous use?

    >
    > Oops, Roger no. I lie. My modem was connected to a LAN port on the
    > router, and I haven't been able to access the modem at all when it is
    > plugged into the WAN port. Is there some sort of secret?


    I have had major problems getting my Woosh modem to work with my D-Link
    DI-614+ router. The Woosh modem requires that the router connect to it
    using PPPoE but, when the router tries to authenticate, the modem spits
    the dummy.

    I have tried connecting the modem directly to the ethernet port on my
    iBook and I get the same result, even though I've checked all the
    settings with the Woosh helpdesk. I'm beginning to suspect that the
    ethernet cable that they have supplied me with may be faulty because, as
    I understand it, the ethernet cable actually has some electronics in it,
    rather than just being a bit of wire with some insulation around it.

    Woosh have told me to take the modem and ethernet cable into Datacom to
    get checked out, so I might do that next week.

    --
    Regards, Alastair.
    www.alastair.geek.nz

    Any opinions expressed in this posting are my own, and do not
    necessarily reflect the views of any other individual or organisation.
    Alastair.geek.nz, Nov 1, 2005
    #9
  10. In <> hog.badger@
    mbox.bol.bg wrote:
    >> Thanks Roger. That's what I've got, but can only use one machine
    >> at a time on the modem. You have simultaneous use?

    >
    > Oops, Roger no. I lie. My modem was connected to a LAN port on the
    > router, and I haven't been able to access the modem at all when it is
    > plugged into the WAN port. Is there some sort of secret?


    Dick Smith has the setup instructions for connecting a Woosh modem to
    their XH1151 roadband router linked from the product page at
    http://www.dse.co.nz/cgi-bin/dse.storefront/en/product/XH1151

    It should work much the same for any router with a WAN port. Let us know
    how it goes though.

    --
    Roger Johnstone, Invercargill, New Zealand
    http://roger.geek.nz/
    ________________________________________________________________________
    No Silicon Heaven? Preposterous! Where would all the calculators go?

    Kryten, from the Red Dwarf episode "The Last Day"
    Roger Johnstone, Nov 1, 2005
    #10
  11. wrote:
    >>Thanks Roger. That's what I've got, but can only use one machine
    >>at a time on the modem. You have simultaneous use?

    >
    >
    > Oops, Roger no. I lie. My modem was connected to a LAN port on the
    > router, and I haven't been able to access the modem at all when it is
    > plugged into the WAN port. Is there some sort of secret?


    Look for a PPoE dialout setting in the routers configuration, and plug
    in your username/password etc, or create a dialup PPPoE connection in
    Windows XP, and then turn on Internet Connection Sharing for it
    Nathan Mercer, Nov 1, 2005
    #11
  12. Gordon Guest

    On Wed, 02 Nov 2005 07:12:30 +1300, Alastair.geek.nz wrote:

    > I'm beginning to suspect that the
    > ethernet cable that they have supplied me with may be faulty because, as
    > I understand it, the ethernet cable actually has some electronics in it,
    > rather than just being a bit of wire with some insulation around it.


    There is a LED which ligths up. The cable itself has ethernet on one end
    and the plug for the modem on the other.
    Gordon, Nov 2, 2005
    #12
  13. Gordon Guest

    On Mon, 31 Oct 2005 21:46:46 -0800, hog.badger wrote:

    > My home network has 3 machines .. one each of WinXP, Win2K and Win98SE
    > a Dick Smith's router.
    >
    > And I have not been able to figure out how to share my Woosh modem.
    > Share, that is, in that more than one machine could use it at a time.
    > They can all use it, but not concurrently.
    >

    This is via USB? If so then as other have said, after you have switched to
    the ethernet ended cable plug it into the WAN port on a router, set up the
    router and enjoyment by all.
    Gordon, Nov 2, 2005
    #13
  14. Guest

    That's the theory, Nathan, but have you actually tried it. I have and
    couldn't get it to work, which is why I bought the DSE router ... on
    the advice of Woosh that that was what I needed.
    , Nov 2, 2005
    #14
  15. Guest

    Sorry, from the fact that I said that I was using a DSE Router I
    thought it obvious that that was what I was doing.
    , Nov 2, 2005
    #15
  16. Guest

    > Dick Smith has the setup instructions for connecting a Woosh
    > modem to their XH1151 roadband router linked from the product
    > page at http://www.dse.co.nz/cgi-bin/dse.storefront/en/product/XH1151


    > It should work much the same for any router with a WAN port.
    > Let us know how it goes though.


    Thanks for the info. That got me working the modem through the WAN
    port, but I can now only use the Win98 machine.
    , Nov 2, 2005
    #16
  17. In article <>,
    Gordon <> wrote:

    > On Wed, 02 Nov 2005 07:12:30 +1300, Alastair.geek.nz wrote:
    >
    > > I'm beginning to suspect that the
    > > ethernet cable that they have supplied me with may be faulty because, as
    > > I understand it, the ethernet cable actually has some electronics in it,
    > > rather than just being a bit of wire with some insulation around it.

    >
    > There is a LED which ligths up. The cable itself has ethernet on one end
    > and the plug for the modem on the other.


    Correct, but I don't think that the LED can give me any clues as to
    what's wrong. From what I recall, it lights up when I attempt to strike
    a PPPoE connection, and remains lit until the cable is disconnected.

    --
    Regards, Alastair.
    www.alastair.geek.nz

    Any opinions expressed in this posting are my own, and do not
    necessarily reflect the views of any other individual or organisation.
    Alastair.geek.nz, Nov 2, 2005
    #17
  18. Guest

    wrote:
    > > Dick Smith has the setup instructions for connecting a Woosh
    > > modem to their XH1151 roadband router linked from the product
    > > page at http://www.dse.co.nz/cgi-bin/dse.storefront/en/product/XH1151

    >
    > > It should work much the same for any router with a WAN port.
    > > Let us know how it goes though.

    >
    > Thanks for the info. That got me working the modem through the WAN
    > port, but I can now only use the Win98 machine.


    Got it all sussed now, thanks. I had to set all machines to fixed IPs,
    get them loading the router admin page, then set them to 'get IP
    automatically' one at a time. Now they're all rebooted and all on the
    internet. What a lot of bother, but worth it in the end.
    , Nov 2, 2005
    #18
  19. Phstpok Guest

    stubbed out the damp squib on 3/11/2005 12:18
    a.m.and tried to bring to our attention, this pearl of wisdom:
    > wrote:
    >
    >>>Dick Smith has the setup instructions for connecting a Woosh
    >>>modem to their XH1151 roadband router linked from the product
    >>>page at http://www.dse.co.nz/cgi-bin/dse.storefront/en/product/XH1151

    >>
    >>>It should work much the same for any router with a WAN port.
    >>>Let us know how it goes though.

    >>
    >>Thanks for the info. That got me working the modem through the WAN
    >>port, but I can now only use the Win98 machine.

    >
    >
    > Got it all sussed now, thanks. I had to set all machines to fixed IPs,
    > get them loading the router admin page, then set them to 'get IP
    > automatically' one at a time. Now they're all rebooted and all on the
    > internet. What a lot of bother, but worth it in the end.
    >

    For future reference

    www.wown.com

    TRob

    --
    Phstpok, the friendly alien
    Phstpok, Nov 2, 2005
    #19
  20. shannon Guest

    On Wed, 02 Nov 2005 03:18:56 -0800, hog.badger wrote:

    >
    > wrote:
    >> > Dick Smith has the setup instructions for connecting a Woosh
    >> > modem to their XH1151 roadband router linked from the product
    >> > page at http://www.dse.co.nz/cgi-bin/dse.storefront/en/product/XH1151

    >>
    >> > It should work much the same for any router with a WAN port.
    >> > Let us know how it goes though.

    >>
    >> Thanks for the info. That got me working the modem through the WAN
    >> port, but I can now only use the Win98 machine.

    >
    > Got it all sussed now, thanks. I had to set all machines to fixed IPs,
    > get them loading the router admin page, then set them to 'get IP
    > automatically' one at a time. Now they're all rebooted and all on the
    > internet. What a lot of bother, but worth it in the end.


    I have used fixed IPs with the DSE router, they still work if they are in
    the same subnet range as the router internal address.
    shannon, Nov 2, 2005
    #20
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