Network topography

Discussion in 'NZ Computing' started by Philip, Jul 26, 2005.

  1. Philip

    Philip Guest

    Looking at wiring the house and wondering what's the best configuration
    to use.
    Way back in my Novell Ethernet days we ran long cables around with BNC
    T-junctions at every computer. That meant effectively a single run of
    cable with a terminator at the far end.

    Good for not having a lot of cable, bad in that any break blocked off
    all the computers on the far side, and usually dragged that side of the
    network down completely.

    Everything I've read lately on small home networks - say ten or twelve
    access points, three or four machines normally connected, possible use
    of the system for audio as well, suggests a star system. At our place
    adsl modem and router will be best placed at one end of the house, which
    will mean several long (30-40 metre) runs of cable.

    Second point: can a simple router like the DSE XH 1169 cope with two
    devices paralleled connected into one output point - so if we had two
    wall jack sockets a metre or two apart, could I connect two different
    computers to them and expect each to work and get its own address?

    It's ten years since I looked seriously at networking, so will
    appreciate all advice and pointers.

    3 Computers all running Windows XP SP2, one running Suse Linux 9.
    Current broadband is Orcon USB, thinking of going for something faster
    but waiting to see if prices will drop. We live in a bush clearing with
    one phone line and no neighbors closer than 500 metres, so choices are
    limited.


    Philip
     
    Philip, Jul 26, 2005
    #1
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  2. Philip

    PAM. Guest

    "Philip" <> wrote in message

    > Looking at wiring the house and wondering what's the best configuration
    > to use.
    > Way back in my Novell Ethernet days we ran long cables around with BNC
    > T-junctions at every computer. That meant effectively a single run of
    > cable with a terminator at the far end.
    >
    > Good for not having a lot of cable, bad in that any break blocked off
    > all the computers on the far side, and usually dragged that side of the
    > network down completely.
    >
    > Everything I've read lately on small home networks - say ten or twelve
    > access points, three or four machines normally connected, possible use
    > of the system for audio as well, suggests a star system. At our place
    > adsl modem and router will be best placed at one end of the house, which
    > will mean several long (30-40 metre) runs of cable.
    >
    > Second point: can a simple router like the DSE XH 1169 cope with two
    > devices paralleled connected into one output point - so if we had two
    > wall jack sockets a metre or two apart, could I connect two different
    > computers to them and expect each to work and get its own address?
    >
    > It's ten years since I looked seriously at networking, so will
    > appreciate all advice and pointers.
    >
    > 3 Computers all running Windows XP SP2, one running Suse Linux 9.
    > Current broadband is Orcon USB, thinking of going for something faster
    > but waiting to see if prices will drop. We live in a bush clearing with
    > one phone line and no neighbors closer than 500 metres, so choices are
    > limited.


    Is wireless not an option?

    PAM.
     
    PAM., Jul 27, 2005
    #2
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  3. Philip

    Philip Guest

    PAM. wrote:
    > "Philip" <> wrote in message
    >
    >
    >>Looking at wiring the house and wondering what's the best configuration
    >>to use.
    >>Way back in my Novell Ethernet days we ran long cables around with BNC
    >>T-junctions at every computer. That meant effectively a single run of
    >>cable with a terminator at the far end.
    >>
    >>Good for not having a lot of cable, bad in that any break blocked off
    >>all the computers on the far side, and usually dragged that side of the
    >>network down completely.
    >>
    >>Everything I've read lately on small home networks - say ten or twelve
    >>access points, three or four machines normally connected, possible use
    >>of the system for audio as well, suggests a star system. At our place
    >>adsl modem and router will be best placed at one end of the house, which
    >>will mean several long (30-40 metre) runs of cable.
    >>
    >>Second point: can a simple router like the DSE XH 1169 cope with two
    >>devices paralleled connected into one output point - so if we had two
    >>wall jack sockets a metre or two apart, could I connect two different
    >>computers to them and expect each to work and get its own address?
    >>
    >>It's ten years since I looked seriously at networking, so will
    >>appreciate all advice and pointers.
    >>
    >>3 Computers all running Windows XP SP2, one running Suse Linux 9.
    >>Current broadband is Orcon USB, thinking of going for something faster
    >>but waiting to see if prices will drop. We live in a bush clearing with
    >>one phone line and no neighbors closer than 500 metres, so choices are
    >>limited.

    >
    >
    > Is wireless not an option?
    >


    Too slow for video streaming, as far as I can see from experiments.
    People talk about 100Mbit wireless networks, but I haven't had that
    level of success here. It also buggers up the tv remote controls from
    the bedroom...

    Philip

    > PAM.
    >
    >
     
    Philip, Jul 27, 2005
    #3
  4. Philip

    Guest

    Install a switch (5-port/8-port/whatever your requirements are) at the
    opposite end of the house to the router, then you'll only need one
    30-40 metre cable run.
     
    , Jul 27, 2005
    #4
  5. On Wed, 27 Jul 2005 09:43:59 +1200, someone purporting to be Philip didst
    scrawl:

    *SNIP*
    > Everything I've read lately on small home networks - say ten or twelve
    > access points, three or four machines normally connected, possible use
    > of the system for audio as well, suggests a star system. At our place
    > adsl modem and router will be best placed at one end of the house, which
    > will mean several long (30-40 metre) runs of cable.
    >

    Get a proper switch, and place it in the middle of the house - floor or
    ceiling cavity, or in a closet.
    Try not to use the network ports on the DSL modem, except to uplink it to
    the master switch. Doing it that way means you don't have any really long
    cable runs, and it also means that you can put in multiple wall sockets
    and have them all live at once.

    > Second point: can a simple router like the DSE XH 1169 cope with two
    > devices paralleled connected into one output point - so if we had two
    > wall jack sockets a metre or two apart, could I connect two different
    > computers to them and expect each to work and get its own address?
    >

    Huh? RJ45 means one host per port (without delving into the evil that are
    cable splitters). I've absolutely NO idea what you're asking here.

    > It's ten years since I looked seriously at networking, so will
    > appreciate all advice and pointers.
    >
    > 3 Computers all running Windows XP SP2, one running Suse Linux 9.
    > Current broadband is Orcon USB, thinking of going for something faster
    > but waiting to see if prices will drop. We live in a bush clearing with
    > one phone line and no neighbors closer than 500 metres, so choices are
    > limited.
    >

    Ah, good luck. The star topology, centred around a reasonable switch,
    will allow you to easily put in a different connection method without
    having to do more than unplug one device and replace it with a new one.

    If you use the Linux server for DNS and DHCP, you can very easily drop in
    a Woosh modem or some other external connection and then everything will
    just work. No futzing around configuring the new device to do your DNS
    and DHCP, your internal network continues to work in the event that it
    catches a power spike, and you also have far more control.

    --
    Matthew Poole
    "Don't use force. Get a bigger hammer."
     
    Matthew Poole, Jul 27, 2005
    #5
  6. Philip

    Dave Taylor Guest

    wrote in news:1122423170.582005.93160
    @g47g2000cwa.googlegroups.com:

    > Install a switch (5-port/8-port/whatever your requirements are) at the
    > opposite end of the house to the router, then you'll only need one
    > 30-40 metre cable run.
    >


    Research Cat5E Cableing methods.


    --
    Ciao, Dave
     
    Dave Taylor, Jul 27, 2005
    #6
  7. Philip wrote:
    >> Is wireless not an option?
    >>

    >
    > Too slow for video streaming, as far as I can see from experiments.
    > People talk about 100Mbit wireless networks, but I haven't had that
    > level of success here. It also buggers up the tv remote controls from
    > the bedroom...


    Try 802.11N (Pre-N WiFi devices are available from several vendors)
    I'm using it at home to stream TV and video all over my house.
    PreN works where I couldn't get 802.11A, 802.11B or 802.11G to stream
    successfully or reliably

    Cheers
    Nathan
     
    Nathan Mercer, Jul 27, 2005
    #7
  8. Re: Network topology

    In article <42e6afbc$>,
    Philip <> wrote:

    >Current broadband is Orcon USB...


    USB-connected network interfaces tend to cause all kinds of problems
    (driver compatibility, platform restrictions etc). Better to get an
    Ethernet-connected one.
     
    Lawrence D¹Oliveiro, Jul 27, 2005
    #8
  9. Philip

    Steve Guest

    Re: Network topology

    On Wed, 27 Jul 2005 19:57:18 +1200, Lawrence D¹Oliveiro wrote:

    > In article <42e6afbc$>,
    > Philip <> wrote:
    >
    >>Current broadband is Orcon USB...

    >
    > USB-connected network interfaces tend to cause all kinds of problems
    > (driver compatibility, platform restrictions etc). Better to get an
    > Ethernet-connected one.

    Out of Hobsons choice[1] at work, I am now using one of those cheap
    dynalink thingies as the external interface to my IPCop firewall. It was a
    *real* b*tch to set up on Telstra, but now it is running it is working
    absolutely perfectly.

    I wouldn't recommend anyone ever to stuff one in the side of a Windoze PC
    - it'll be hacked in seconds - but this is a rock solid solution. Possibly
    overkill for your setup, but maybe not.

    Steve

    [1] The only other option at the time was a dedicated, telstra clear
    managed router that didn't work when we moved offices to a different make
    of dslam apparently.
     
    Steve, Jul 27, 2005
    #9
  10. Philip

    Robert Cooze Guest

    Re: Network topology Dynalink

    Steve wrote:
    8><
    >
    > Out of Hobsons choice[1] at work, I am now using one of those cheap
    > dynalink thingies as the external interface to my IPCop firewall. It was a
    > *real* b*tch to set up on Telstra, but now it is running it is working
    > absolutely perfectly.


    That Cheep dynalink Thingies?

    what model and what did you have to do to ipcop? I am looking at
    changing to UBS if the price is rite in the neer future? Dont want a
    rauter as an external red interface as It will make the rest of my setup
    too hard.


    --
    http://cooze.co.nz home of the RecyclerMan aka Robert Cooze

    / __/ / / / / /__ / / ___/ / __/ / / / |/ / /__ /
    / / / /_/ / / /_/ / _-' / __/ / / / /_/ / / /| / _-'
    ___\ ____/ ____/ /___/ /____/ /_/ ___\ ____/ /_/ /_/ |_/ /___/
     
    Robert Cooze, Jul 27, 2005
    #10
  11. Philip

    Dave Taylor Guest

    Re: Network topology Dynalink

    Robert Cooze <> wrote in
    news::

    > Dont want a
    > rauter as an external red interface as It will make the rest of my setup
    > too hard.
    >


    You set the router to bridge mode and it feeds you a real world IP you
    stick into the red interface of IPCop.

    --
    Ciao, Dave
     
    Dave Taylor, Jul 28, 2005
    #11
  12. Philip

    Robert Cooze Guest

    Re: Network topology Dynalink

    Dave Taylor wrote:
    > Robert Cooze <> wrote in
    > news::
    >
    >
    >>Dont want a
    >>rauter as an external red interface as It will make the rest of my setup
    >>too hard.
    >>

    >
    >
    > You set the router to bridge mode and it feeds you a real world IP you
    > stick into the red interface of IPCop.
    >

    That would work on the proviso that I can get extra network card in the
    firewall.

    The Current box a P100 has three pci and 4 isa it hangs big time if i
    put thre PCI card's in it :) it has usb headder pins from memory. If it
    doesent I have a 450Mhz mini ATX with two PCI and one ISA with onbord
    USB this box has a bout 128Mb Ram in it.

    At the moment I have two Network cards in my fire wall both pci as I am
    using the green and orrange (running some of my site from my local Box)

    This is not a rant the usb option looks like a workaball option.

    --
    http://cooze.co.nz home of the RecyclerMan aka Robert Cooze

    / __/ / / / / /__ / / ___/ / __/ / / / |/ / /__ /
    / / / /_/ / / /_/ / _-' / __/ / / / /_/ / / /| / _-'
    ___\ ____/ ____/ /___/ /____/ /_/ ___\ ____/ /_/ /_/ |_/ /___/
     
    Robert Cooze, Jul 28, 2005
    #12
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