Network client boot disks?

Discussion in 'MCSE' started by Kayne, Jun 18, 2007.

  1. Kayne

    Kayne Guest

    I just can't understand why it is seems so difficult to create a
    client boot disk. I'm studying for the 70-270 Windows XP exam. I'm
    using the Microsoft Press self paced training book. It lists the
    steps for installing XP across the network using both attended and
    unattended installations. In both cases the book goes something
    like... Step 1 create a client boot disk, step 2 map to the resources
    containing the installation files, step 3 run the Winnt32.exe file
    with such and such parameters, etc.

    The kicker is that step 1. The book is just so damn blase' about it.
    At work I use Altiris to push images to client machines, and I always
    took the boot disk a bit for granted. I mean sometimes it's a pain to
    get the dos drivers, but other than that Altiris just creates the boot
    disk for you.

    I know that I could just use Altiris to create a boot disk for myself
    then use it for the over the network installations. Simple enough.
    But the point is that I'm trying to learn how to do it myself, from
    scratch.

    Now that I'm trying to learn how to do it from scratch I'm beginning
    to realize that Microsoft has made no simple provisions for this, and
    that their training materials take it for granted that everybody has
    this job well in hand.

    I've found several websites that actually sell generic boot disks that
    are loaded down with a lot of pre-loaded dos drivers for various
    NICs. I've found a website that tells how to create a boot disk using
    some utility that was found on Windows NT server and then modify it so
    that it will work with Windows XP and 2003. I have found several
    websites that say in order to do this you must format a disk with
    Windows 98, ME, or 2000, then load various and sundry drivers because
    Windows XP can't, for some reason, do over the network installations
    with it's own formatted bootable floppies.

    Am I missing something? Is the book so blase' about this because
    there actually is a very simple way to do it and I've completely
    overlooked it, or is this some sort of perverse joke that Microsoft is
    playing on those of us who are trying to certify our knowledge of
    their systems? Have they come back and addressed this issue for over
    the network installations on the Vista and 2007 platforms?

    Could somone elaborate on this for me, because I'm experiencing a lot
    of frustartion?

    Thanks in advance for any light shed on this topic.
    Kayne, Jun 18, 2007
    #1
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  2. Kayne

    catwalker63 Guest

    Kayne piffled away vaguely:

    <snip>
    > Could somone elaborate on this for me, because I'm experiencing a lot
    > of frustartion?


    You are doing exactly what you are supposed to be doing. MS will not
    hold your hand through this process. You may find some help here:

    http://bootdisk.com/

    I would also continue your search in the KB and Technet as well as
    Google. It can be done. It is a pain. That's why there are products
    like Ghost and Altirus. Learn it for the exam but don't use it in
    real life.

    --

    Catwalker
    MCNGP #43
    www.mcngp.com
    "I have a gun. It's loaded. Shut up."
    catwalker63, Jun 18, 2007
    #2
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  3. Kayne

    Kayne Guest

    On Jun 17, 10:25 pm, catwalker63 <>
    wrote:
    > Kayne piffled away vaguely:
    >
    > <snip>
    >
    > > Could somone elaborate on this for me, because I'm experiencing a lot
    > > of frustartion?

    >
    > You are doing exactly what you are supposed to be doing. MS will not
    > hold your hand through this process. You may find some help here:
    >
    > http://bootdisk.com/
    >
    > I would also continue your search in the KB and Technet as well as
    > Google. It can be done. It is a pain. That's why there are products
    > like Ghost and Altirus. Learn it for the exam but don't use it in
    > real life.
    >
    > --
    >
    > Catwalker
    > MCNGP #43www.mcngp.com
    > "I have a gun. It's loaded. Shut up."



    Thanks for the reply. Yes, I *thought* that I had a deep appreciation
    for Altiris, but now more than ever. What about the second part of my
    question. Has MS revisited any of this for the Vista and 2007
    rollouts? I wonder if MS is in some sort of formal or informal
    agreement with Symantec and/or Norton and that is why they are leaving
    out any real support for creating boot disks. I mean, apparantly they
    used to have a mechanised way of doing it back in the NT server days,
    and it seems that this would be something highly desirable.
    Kayne, Jun 18, 2007
    #3
  4. "Kayne" <> wrote in message
    news:...
    >I just can't understand why it is seems so difficult to create a
    > client boot disk. I'm studying for the 70-270 Windows XP exam. I'm
    > using the Microsoft Press self paced training book. It lists the
    > steps for installing XP across the network using both attended and
    > unattended installations. In both cases the book goes something
    > like... Step 1 create a client boot disk, step 2 map to the resources
    > containing the installation files, step 3 run the Winnt32.exe file
    > with such and such parameters, etc.
    >
    > The kicker is that step 1. The book is just so damn blase' about it.
    > At work I use Altiris to push images to client machines, and I always
    > took the boot disk a bit for granted. I mean sometimes it's a pain to
    > get the dos drivers, but other than that Altiris just creates the boot
    > disk for you.
    >
    > I know that I could just use Altiris to create a boot disk for myself
    > then use it for the over the network installations. Simple enough.
    > But the point is that I'm trying to learn how to do it myself, from
    > scratch.
    >
    > Now that I'm trying to learn how to do it from scratch I'm beginning
    > to realize that Microsoft has made no simple provisions for this, and
    > that their training materials take it for granted that everybody has
    > this job well in hand.
    >
    > I've found several websites that actually sell generic boot disks that
    > are loaded down with a lot of pre-loaded dos drivers for various
    > NICs. I've found a website that tells how to create a boot disk using
    > some utility that was found on Windows NT server and then modify it so
    > that it will work with Windows XP and 2003. I have found several
    > websites that say in order to do this you must format a disk with
    > Windows 98, ME, or 2000, then load various and sundry drivers because
    > Windows XP can't, for some reason, do over the network installations
    > with it's own formatted bootable floppies.
    >
    > Am I missing something? Is the book so blase' about this because
    > there actually is a very simple way to do it and I've completely
    > overlooked it, or is this some sort of perverse joke that Microsoft is
    > playing on those of us who are trying to certify our knowledge of
    > their systems? Have they come back and addressed this issue for over
    > the network installations on the Vista and 2007 platforms?
    >
    > Could somone elaborate on this for me, because I'm experiencing a lot
    > of frustartion?
    >
    > Thanks in advance for any light shed on this topic.
    >



    I feel an extreme reluctance to articulate on this topic for fear of
    deviating from the truth.
    Pluto Platter, Jun 18, 2007
    #4
  5. Kayne

    catwalker63 Guest

    Kayne piffled away vaguely:

    > On Jun 17, 10:25 pm, catwalker63 <>
    > wrote:
    >> Kayne piffled away vaguely:
    >>
    >> <snip>
    >>
    >> > Could somone elaborate on this for me, because I'm experiencing a lot
    >> > of frustartion?

    >>
    >> You are doing exactly what you are supposed to be doing. MS will not
    >> hold your hand through this process. You may find some help here:
    >>
    >> http://bootdisk.com/
    >>
    >> I would also continue your search in the KB and Technet as well as
    >> Google. It can be done. It is a pain. That's why there are products
    >> like Ghost and Altirus. Learn it for the exam but don't use it in
    >> real life.
    >>
    >> --
    >>
    >> Catwalker
    >> MCNGP #43www.mcngp.com
    >> "I have a gun. It's loaded. Shut up."

    >
    >
    > Thanks for the reply. Yes, I *thought* that I had a deep appreciation
    > for Altiris, but now more than ever. What about the second part of my
    > question. Has MS revisited any of this for the Vista and 2007
    > rollouts? I wonder if MS is in some sort of formal or informal
    > agreement with Symantec and/or Norton and that is why they are leaving
    > out any real support for creating boot disks. I mean, apparantly they
    > used to have a mechanised way of doing it back in the NT server days,
    > and it seems that this would be something highly desirable.


    This has been supplanted by imaging software. It is a nice historical
    footnote but there is not need for it. I'm sure MS is working on
    developing or buying their own imaging software system.
    --

    Catwalker
    MCNGP #43
    www.mcngp.com
    "I have a gun. It's loaded. Shut up."
    catwalker63, Jun 18, 2007
    #5
  6. Kayne

    kpg Guest

    "Pluto Platter" <> wrote in news:#XwC2qVsHHA.3468
    @TK2MSFTNGP05.phx.gbl:

    > I feel an extreme reluctance to articulate on this topic for fear of
    > deviating from the truth.



    ahhh. An honest man, um, platter.
    kpg, Jun 18, 2007
    #6
  7. Kayne

    2feral Guest

    I would not get to involved in that, things like NTFS permissions etc
    more important as well as differences between backup jobs.

    Just use xp and the use xp and the use xp, looking at every option
    when doing what the press book says to do i think is more important.

    These more advanced topics might be roughly 1 out of 50 questions so
    lets says 2% per advanced question so make sure you understand all the
    bread n butter topics if you want to pass this exam as permissions
    will be like 20-30 questions or 50% or so.
    2feral, Jun 27, 2007
    #7
  8. Kayne

    Kayne Guest

    2feral wrote:
    > I would not get to involved in that, things like NTFS permissions etc
    > more important as well as differences between backup jobs.
    >
    > Just use xp and the use xp and the use xp, looking at every option
    > when doing what the press book says to do i think is more important.
    >
    > These more advanced topics might be roughly 1 out of 50 questions so
    > lets says 2% per advanced question so make sure you understand all the
    > bread n butter topics if you want to pass this exam as permissions
    > will be like 20-30 questions or 50% or so.


    That is good advice purely from the standpoint of passing a
    certification exam. However, in my case, that really isn't my big
    concern. I am already an IT professional and as for the 70-270 exam,
    a great many of the things covered by this study guide, the majority
    in fact, I work with on a daily basis such as NTFS file, folder, and
    share persmissions. My main goal is to become familiar with the less
    used, more esoteric concepts covered. Not really as much for passing
    the exam as just for having an understanding of them.

    The issue at hand is a perfect case in point. At my company we have
    always used Altiris for imaging and deployment. I have been to the
    Altiris Deployment Solution training class, and I rely very heavily on
    the product. Altiris, in point of fact, has the native ability to
    create a network client boot disk, exactly like the one we are
    discussing. I don't really *have* to know how to do it. I have a
    product that does it. The problem is, I've used this product so
    heavily that I've never really bothered to learn the principles of
    creating a network client boot disk and installing an OS or deploying
    an image via RIS (or any other method for that matter), myself.
    Truthfully, once I learn these principles, I'll probably go right back
    to Altiris and never use them again, but I'll have the knowledge and
    be a more well rounded and thoroughly knowledgable IT professional.
    Which, I think, should be the true goal.

    Truthfully, in the IT industry, you can not get along without a
    thorough understanding NTFS permissions, which is why the exam focuses
    so heavily on them. You *can* get along without knowing how to create
    a client boot disk. But it is those rare moments that such esoteric
    knowledge comes into play that you really come out looking like hero.

    At any rate, your advise is sound and I do appreciate it, but I still
    want/need to know how to do this myself.
    Kayne, Jun 28, 2007
    #8
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