Netflix, WalMart and Blockbuster comparison questions

Discussion in 'DVD Video' started by Pumping Ice, Jan 1, 2004.

  1. Pumping Ice

    Pumping Ice Guest

    I'm interested in knowing exactly what the differences are between the
    services run by these three companies. If anyone can tell me i'd appreciate
    it.

    I've been so impressed with Netflix that I actually worry a bit about
    WalMart getting into this arena. They seem to lowball all their competitors
    and then, after forcing out the competition, make everyone get accustomed to
    poor service. I checked out WalMart's website and all I could really gleam
    from it was that you could rent 2, 3 or 4 movies for as little as $15.54 a
    month. They do not display their pricing plans on the site. Neither does
    Netflix or FilmCaddy (owned by Blockbuster).

    What also annoys me about WalMart is that this DVD rental business they've
    gone into seems, at least on the outside, to be a knee-jerk reaction to
    Netflix, and it really doesn't speak to or have any relevance to the core
    business functions that WalMart has performed in the past that have helped
    get it where it is today. It's almost as if Wal-Mart can't stand to see
    other companies make money without asking for or receiving Wal-Mart's help,
    so they go out and undercut the competitor. Can any entrepeneur have an idea
    in this country that they nurture to success without Wal-Mart immediately
    coming in and trying to rip off? I've often said that WalMart would open a
    neighborhood lemonade stand at 10 cents and undercut the local kids who have
    been running one at 25 cents a cup in order to gain market share. Wal-Mart
    selling Girl Scout Cookies can't be too far behind.

    I really don't want to be at the mercy of Wal-Mart employees to pick and
    package my movies and manage my account. I can't imagine that their
    selection of films is better than Netflix. Considering the fact that
    Wal-Mart won't sell FHM, Maxim or Stuff Magazine, and routinely will not
    sell certain CDs, I wouldn't expect to find commercially interesting, as
    well as quirky and older films and tv series, on their website. The same can
    be said of Blockbuster. One of the main reasons why I finally gave Netflix a
    shot was that my local Blockbusters didn't have one single copy of Hollywood
    Shuffle to rent because they didn't own one copy of Hollywood Shuffle. And
    they'd only rent the "R" rated version of Y Tu Mama Tambien, whereas
    Netflix rents out the unedited, unrated version. I found this delightfully
    hypocritical disclaimer at the Blockbuster.com website:

    "All films carried at blockbuster.com carry ratings that have been
    established by the Motion Picture Association of America, Inc. In order to
    provide a wholesome environment for you and your family, we do not carry
    films with ratings of NC-17 or X.

    YRP = YOUTH RESTRICTED PRODUCT
    Unrated films not containing material suitable for all audiences are
    designated by BLOCKBUSTER as restricted and marked with a YRP sticker.

    YRP product is suitable to Blockbuster's YOUTH RESTRICTED VIEWING® policy,
    which requires parental consent for the rental of "R" rated and "YRP"
    labeled movies and "M" rated games to youths under the age of 17."

    This is a slight change in their policy, as they used to refuse to allow
    anyone under 17 to rent the Youth Restricted movies. Now they can as long as
    they have parental permission. What i'd like to know is where is the
    distinction between an NC-17 film and a Youth Restricted Film-No One Under
    17?

    At this time i'd like to thank Blockbuster for protecting me from NC-17
    films, but having plenty of copies of Bad Boys II, chock full of violent
    goodness, on hand for my rental pleasure.

    Clearly i'm no fan of either WalMart or Blockbuster. I've had my fill of
    both of their hypocrisy. I just am hoping someone will tell me it's going to
    be okay and that even though WalMart is trying to breathe down Netflix's
    neck, Netflix will survive and thrive in spite of Wal-Marts attempts.

    Any comments?


    --

    ----------------------------------
    ICEBREAKER
    "You don't want to beat me or screw me? What kind of a marriage is this?
    Bring a book."
    Pumping Ice, Jan 1, 2004
    #1
    1. Advertising

  2. Pumping Ice

    Mike Davis Guest

    Geez Ice, don't get yer' undies in a bundle..
    "Pumping Ice" <> wrote in message
    news:...
    > I'm interested in knowing exactly what the differences are between the
    > services run by these three companies. If anyone can tell me i'd

    appreciate
    > it.
    >
    > I've been so impressed with Netflix that I actually worry a bit about
    > WalMart getting into this arena. They seem to lowball all their

    competitors
    > and then, after forcing out the competition, make everyone get accustomed

    to
    > poor service. I checked out WalMart's website and all I could really gleam
    > from it was that you could rent 2, 3 or 4 movies for as little as $15.54 a
    > month. They do not display their pricing plans on the site. Neither does
    > Netflix or FilmCaddy (owned by Blockbuster).
    >

    You're right on this one...you missed the part about eight out and
    possible rentals of twenty a month, obviously only if you live in the righta
    area, hey wait, that sounds like... Netflix!

    > What also annoys me about WalMart is that this DVD rental business they've
    > gone into seems, at least on the outside, to be a knee-jerk reaction to
    > Netflix, and it really doesn't speak to or have any relevance to the core
    > business functions that WalMart has performed in the past that have helped
    > get it where it is today. It's almost as if Wal-Mart can't stand to see
    > other companies make money without asking for or receiving Wal-Mart's

    help,
    > so they go out and undercut the competitor. Can any entrepeneur have an

    idea
    > in this country that they nurture to success without Wal-Mart immediately
    > coming in and trying to rip off? I've often said that WalMart would open a
    > neighborhood lemonade stand at 10 cents and undercut the local kids who

    have
    > been running one at 25 cents a cup in order to gain market share. Wal-Mart
    > selling Girl Scout Cookies can't be too far behind.


    Remember though that Wal-Mart _is_ the largest retailer in the world, they
    don't really need to worry about rivals. It's not like Netflix owned the
    rental breed, lots of folks, Wal-Mart included simply jumped on the
    bandwagon.
    >
    > I really don't want to be at the mercy of Wal-Mart employees to pick and
    > package my movies and manage my account. I can't imagine that their
    > selection of films is better than Netflix. Considering the fact that
    > Wal-Mart won't sell FHM, Maxim or Stuff Magazine, and routinely will not
    > sell certain CDs, I wouldn't expect to find commercially interesting, as
    > well as quirky and older films and tv series, on their website. The same

    can
    > be said of Blockbuster. One of the main reasons why I finally gave Netflix

    a
    > shot was that my local Blockbusters didn't have one single copy of

    Hollywood
    > Shuffle to rent because they didn't own one copy of Hollywood Shuffle. And
    > they'd only rent the "R" rated version of Y Tu Mama Tambien, whereas
    > Netflix rents out the unedited, unrated version. I found this

    delightfully
    > hypocritical disclaimer at the Blockbuster.com website:


    You're _never_ at the mercy of Wal-Mart (LOL.) You can always go someplace
    else or break down and actually buy films <ggg.> Your local Library may well
    carry quite a few.

    > "All films carried at blockbuster.com carry ratings that have been
    > established by the Motion Picture Association of America, Inc. In order to
    > provide a wholesome environment for you and your family, we do not carry
    > films with ratings of NC-17 or X.


    Who really cares about NC-17 or X? To be fair, most popular films are either
    G, PG or R, not NC-17 or the death blow of X. If you want to watch some
    wierd french film about animal husbandry that is fine with me, just not with
    Wal-Mart <ggg.>
    >
    > YRP = YOUTH RESTRICTED PRODUCT
    > Unrated films not containing material suitable for all audiences are
    > designated by BLOCKBUSTER as restricted and marked with a YRP sticker.
    >
    > YRP product is suitable to Blockbuster's YOUTH RESTRICTED VIEWING® policy,
    > which requires parental consent for the rental of "R" rated and "YRP"
    > labeled movies and "M" rated games to youths under the age of 17."
    >
    > This is a slight change in their policy, as they used to refuse to allow
    > anyone under 17 to rent the Youth Restricted movies. Now they can as long

    as
    > they have parental permission. What i'd like to know is where is the
    > distinction between an NC-17 film and a Youth Restricted Film-No One Under
    > 17?
    >
    > At this time i'd like to thank Blockbuster for protecting me from NC-17
    > films, but having plenty of copies of Bad Boys II, chock full of violent
    > goodness, on hand for my rental pleasure.
    >
    > Clearly i'm no fan of either WalMart or Blockbuster. I've had my fill of
    > both of their hypocrisy. I just am hoping someone will tell me it's going

    to
    > be okay and that even though WalMart is trying to breathe down Netflix's
    > neck, Netflix will survive and thrive in spite of Wal-Marts attempts.
    >
    > Any comments?
    >
    >
    > --
    >
    > ----------------------------------
    > ICEBREAKER
    > "You don't want to beat me or screw me? What kind of a marriage is this?
    > Bring a book."


    Well Ice, there's the full encilada as we say.
    C'mon, you're not going to get any sympathy votes with that little
    diatribe. Hell, my four year old does better than that at breakfast <gggg.>
    Wal-Mart is huge, and can do whatever they want, _any_ rinky-dink little
    company like Netflix is going to get eaten up in the storm.
    Happy new year, all the best, Mike
    Mike Davis, Jan 1, 2004
    #2
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  3. Pumping Ice

    Nonymous Guest

    > Wal-Mart won't sell FHM, Maxim or Stuff Magazine, and routinely will not
    > sell certain CDs,


    > "All films carried at blockbuster.com carry ratings that have been
    > established by the Motion Picture Association of America, Inc. In order to
    > provide a wholesome environment for you and your family, we do not carry
    > films with ratings of NC-17 or X.


    Well, Walmart doesn't carry very many magazines in the first place. So why
    is them not carrying these three rags (i'm a virile male yet I admit these
    are rags) amount to censorship versus they have to limit their choices given
    the number of low titles they're only willing to carry? I bet if it was a
    mom&pop store not selling FHM, you wouldn't care so much. But when
    corporations choose to sell something we call it 'censorship'? Hey, it's
    their choice, just like it's mom & pop's choice; we are free to shop
    elsewhere.
    Yes, Walmart won't sell certain CDs, but more commonly, they're criticized
    for selling censored versions of CDs that they get the record companies to
    make for them and don't label the CDs as being censored. *That* practice is
    what pisses people off.

    With DVDs, Walmart is being a little more liberal. Probably because
    children dont go around buying DVDs like they do CDs. Walmart isn't selling
    censored DVDs. In fact you'll find they sell titles such as Scarface,
    Apocalypse Now, etc. They *do* have a policy of not selling *unrated*
    titles, though; same as Blockbuster. So they don't carry the unrated DVD cut
    of "Requiem for a Dream", for example. It sucks, but oh well, that's their
    choice.
    Nonymous, Jan 1, 2004
    #3
  4. Pumping Ice

    Nonymous Guest

    > > "All films carried at blockbuster.com carry ratings that have been
    > > established by the Motion Picture Association of America, Inc. In order

    to
    > > provide a wholesome environment for you and your family, we do not carry
    > > films with ratings of NC-17 or X.

    >
    > Who really cares about NC-17 or X? To be fair, most popular films are

    either
    > G, PG or R, not NC-17 or the death blow of X. If you want to watch some
    > wierd french film about animal husbandry that is fine with me, just not

    with
    > Wal-Mart <ggg.>


    But many DVDs are released as 'unrated cuts' such as the 'American Pie'
    films or 'Requiem for a Dream' for example.
    Nonymous, Jan 1, 2004
    #4
  5. In article <>,
    "Pumping Ice" <> wrote:

    > I really don't want to be at the mercy of Wal-Mart employees to pick and
    > package my movies and manage my account.


    Then don't use them. You know what will ultimately happen and you know
    that the service will be subpar.

    I hope that people realize the blight that WalMart is and will avoid
    them despite the fact they save you a few pennies as a tradeoff for real
    service.
    Urra Dipschitt, Jan 1, 2004
    #5
  6. Pumping Ice

    Pumping Ice Guest

    "Nonymous" <> wrote in message
    news:...

    > I bet if it was a mom&pop store not selling FHM, you wouldn't care so

    much. But when
    > corporations choose to sell something we call it 'censorship'? Hey, it's
    > their choice, just like it's mom & pop's choice; we are free to shop
    > elsewhere.


    Which I do. I only use the issue of Maxim, FHM and Stuff to illustrate that
    their policy could theoretically apply to DVDs as well. On their website
    they say they have over 14,000 different titles. Netflix says they have over
    15,000 titles (and they've been saying that for a while. Haven't they, like,
    crossed the 16,000 title marker by now or something?). So I guess by
    WalMart's own admission they rent fewer titles, which means they have a
    smaller selection.

    > With DVDs, Walmart is being a little more liberal. Probably because
    > children dont go around buying DVDs like they do CDs.


    USA Today, on Tuesday, mentioned that DVDs are so enormously popular now
    that WalMart is using them as loss-leadres. That could explain the "more
    liberal" attitude. Whereas the music industry sales have been in decline,
    DVD continues to go up. So I guess we can expect WalMart to be liberal
    towards DVDs until the trends begin to reverse.

    > So they don't carry the unrated DVD cut of "Requiem for a Dream", for

    example. It sucks, but oh well, that's their
    > choice.


    Funny you should mention 'Requiem'. A girl I talk to at the local deli, who
    is also a member of Netflix, recommended that movie. But of course we both
    know we wouldn't be able to rent the really good edition through WalMart or
    Blockbuster's rental services.

    ----------------------------------
    ICEBREAKER
    "You don't want to beat me or screw me? What kind of a marriage is this?
    Bring a book."
    Pumping Ice, Jan 1, 2004
    #6
  7. Pumping Ice

    Phil Guest

    Just for fun, go to your favorite search engine (like Google.com) and type
    in trouble Walmart and learn what unbridled greed will do to us (US?).
    You've got to wonder how they can "roll back prices" and still make those
    four brothers BILLIONAIRES?????

    It's simple, there is a difference between the price of merchandise and the
    cost of it.


    "Urra Dipschitt" <> wrote in message
    news:...
    > In article <>,
    > "Pumping Ice" <> wrote:
    >
    > > I really don't want to be at the mercy of Wal-Mart employees to pick and
    > > package my movies and manage my account.

    >
    > Then don't use them. You know what will ultimately happen and you know
    > that the service will be subpar.
    >
    > I hope that people realize the blight that WalMart is and will avoid
    > them despite the fact they save you a few pennies as a tradeoff for real
    > service.
    Phil, Jan 3, 2004
    #7
  8. Pumping Ice

    sunsunbear Guest

    The sister ain't doin' too shabby either...
    sunsunbear, Jan 24, 2004
    #8
  9. Pumping Ice wrote:

    > I'm interested in knowing exactly what the differences are between the
    > services run by these three companies. If anyone can tell me i'd appreciate
    > it.
    >
    > I've been so impressed with Netflix that I actually worry a bit about
    > WalMart getting into this arena.


    That's when they know what they're doing.
    Would it make you feel any better to know that their sideline's
    currently hemmoraging money, and posing, er...no *immediate* threat to
    Netflix in the Availability arena?

    Derek Janssen (who *doesn't* panic at every single thing he reads in the
    WSJ)
    Derek Janssen, Jan 24, 2004
    #9
  10. Pumping Ice

    Justin Guest

    sunsunbear wrote on [Fri, 23 Jan 2004 20:02:14 -0600]:
    > The sister ain't doin' too shabby either...
    >


    Well done. This post makes no sense at all
    Justin, Jan 25, 2004
    #10
  11. Pumping Ice

    sunsunbear Guest

    Apparently you are totally unaware that Mr. Sam doesn't just have 'sons'...
    he has a daughter. And she is the creative mind behind Wal-mart
    Supermarkets (the Wal-marts that are Grocery/Pharmacy only). I wasn't aware
    that commenting on how she, too, is existent in the Walton family didn't
    make sense. Perhaps you need a dictionary?
    sunsunbear, Jan 27, 2004
    #11
  12. In article <GJnRb.265$EW.20@okepread02>,
    "sunsunbear" <> wrote:

    > And she is the creative mind behind Wal-mart
    > Supermarkets


    Fucking with people's lives is "creative". Cool.
    Urra Dipschitt, Jan 27, 2004
    #12
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