Need small, light camera for travel

Discussion in 'Digital Photography' started by anne, Aug 23, 2004.

  1. anne

    anne Guest

    I have a Canon A20 which I like very much. However I want a reliable camera
    that is smaller, lightweight, and good for traveling. A good point-and-shoot
    is OK. Any suggestions?
    anne, Aug 23, 2004
    #1
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  2. anne

    Nostrobino Guest

    "anne" <> wrote in message
    news:AepWc.1461$Y%...
    > I have a Canon A20 which I like very much. However I want a reliable

    camera
    > that is smaller, lightweight, and good for traveling. A good

    point-and-shoot
    > is OK. Any suggestions?


    Almost anything in the Minolta X series. They're very light, smaller in
    height and width than a 3½-inch floppy and less than an inch thick. My
    suggestion would be the Xg model (which I have, along with its predecessor
    the Xt), provided its lithium-ion battery and charger would not be a problem
    for you when traveling. If you need something that takes standard or
    rechargeable AA cells instead, take a look at the X20 or the new X31.

    These are great little cameras. As with any ultracompact, just don't expect
    great flash range. And be careful not to get your finger in front of the
    lens, which is in the upper left corner and never extends from the camera
    (Minolta's unique design has the 3x zoom lens "folded" inside the left side
    of the camera).

    I get nice sharp, well-exposed 8½ x 11 prints from my Xt and Xg. These
    models are 3.2 megapixel. (The original X and the X20 are 2.0 megapixels.)
    They also have a feature which allows you to copy any photo on the card to a
    smaller, more compressed file in another folder on the card for e-mailing.
    At first I thought this was kind of a hokey feature, but I've found it
    actually very useful for that purpose. Copied as a 640 x 480 image a typical
    photo takes up only about 70K, so e-mails very fast even over a 56K dial-up
    connection. All the current X series have this feature.

    You can find very complete reviews on these cameras at Steve's Digicams. For
    example,
    http://steves-digicams.com/2004_reviews/dimagexg.html

    N.
    Nostrobino, Aug 23, 2004
    #2
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  3. anne

    Hunt Guest

    In article <AepWc.1461$Y%>, ruanne24
    @earthlink.net says...
    >
    >I have a Canon A20 which I like very much. However I want a reliable camera
    >that is smaller, lightweight, and good for traveling. A good point-and-shoot
    >is OK. Any suggestions?


    With similar needs in mind, I just purchased a Canon S60 for my wife. So far,
    she loves the camera, and it seems to work nicely for just this type of
    shooting. One aspect that I wanted for her was a good WA, and the Canon gets
    her to ~28mm eq. After making tons of comparisons, I (a confirmed Nikon owner
    for decades) opted for the Canon. As of yet, my wife is very pleased with the
    unit, and, looking at her shots in PS, so am I.

    For your needs, however, actually holding and using the camera, might be far
    more important, than sheer specs.

    Hunt
    Hunt, Aug 23, 2004
    #3
  4. On Mon, 23 Aug 2004 16:49:36 GMT, "anne" <>
    wrote:

    >I have a Canon A20 which I like very much. However I want a reliable camera
    >that is smaller, lightweight, and good for traveling. A good point-and-shoot
    >is OK. Any suggestions?


    Pentax Optio S4i is very small, very light, 4 Megapixel and not
    terribly expensive at around $400.
    Tee
    --
    Verba volant, scripta manent.
    Tee Doubleyou, Aug 23, 2004
    #4
  5. anne

    Tom Scales Guest

    "Tee Doubleyou" <> wrote in message
    news:...
    > On Mon, 23 Aug 2004 16:49:36 GMT, "anne" <>
    > wrote:
    >
    >>I have a Canon A20 which I like very much. However I want a reliable
    >>camera
    >>that is smaller, lightweight, and good for traveling. A good
    >>point-and-shoot
    >>is OK. Any suggestions?

    >
    > Pentax Optio S4i is very small, very light, 4 Megapixel and not
    > terribly expensive at around $400.
    > Tee


    I've seen criticism here for the S4i but I love mine. It is tiny!

    Tom
    Tom Scales, Aug 23, 2004
    #5
  6. anne

    Mike S. Guest

    In article <AepWc.1461$Y%>,
    anne <> wrote:
    >I have a Canon A20 which I like very much. However I want a reliable camera
    >that is smaller, lightweight, and good for traveling. A good point-and-shoot
    >is OK. Any suggestions?


    I had the same dilemma with respect to my big, bulky C5050 and my wife. I
    went looking for something adequate for 4x6 prints and an occasional
    enlargement, and the two essential conditions I look for:

    - non-proprietary batteries
    - cheap, non-proprietary, readily-available memory

    I settled on the Panasonic ("Lumix") DMC-LC70 which uses two "AA" cells
    and SD cards. It is small enough to carry on the hip, has 4 MP sensor
    adequate for her needs, a decent lens without significant geometric
    distortion at the extremes of zoom, and a CCD which is not excessively
    noisy.
    Mike S., Aug 25, 2004
    #6
  7. "anne" <> writes:

    >I have a Canon A20 which I like very much. However I want a reliable camera
    >that is smaller, lightweight, and good for traveling. A good point-and-shoot
    >is OK. Any suggestions?


    Sony has several similar cameras in their DSC series. The DSC-W1 and DSC-P100
    are both 5.1MP, good picture and quite small, should be around $400. The
    DSC-T1 is even smaller but compromises in flash range a bit, costs around
    $500. I just got a P100 and am quite happy (previously had an Optio S, I can
    recommend that series as well).

    Bill
    --
    @@@@@@@ If my laptop battery is almost empty,
    * @@@ * shouldn't my laptop be lighter?
    *@@*
    -\*
    Bill Sheppard, Aug 31, 2004
    #7
  8. anne

    Roger Guest

    On 23 Aug 2004 18:56:21 GMT, (Hunt) wrote:

    >In article <AepWc.1461$Y%>, ruanne24
    >@earthlink.net says...
    >>
    >>I have a Canon A20 which I like very much. However I want a reliable camera
    >>that is smaller, lightweight, and good for traveling. A good point-and-shoot
    >>is OK. Any suggestions?

    >
    >With similar needs in mind, I just purchased a Canon S60 for my wife. So far,
    >she loves the camera, and it seems to work nicely for just this type of
    >shooting. One aspect that I wanted for her was a good WA, and the Canon gets
    >her to ~28mm eq. After making tons of comparisons, I (a confirmed Nikon owner
    >for decades) opted for the Canon. As of yet, my wife is very pleased with the
    >unit, and, looking at her shots in PS, so am I.
    >
    >For your needs, however, actually holding and using the camera, might be far
    >more important, than sheer specs.
    >
    >Hunt


    I'll echo the support for the Canon S60 for travel with one exception,
    the proprietary battery. The battery may not be appropriate for some,
    however I swallowed the ~$50US cost for a second high capacity battery
    and I'm very pleased. So far it's been on a couple of trips to Asia
    and with me constantly otherwise. Charging of batteries has not been a
    problem and although you can get 200+ pictures on a batter, a second
    is great security.

    For me the 28mm lens equivalent was a necessity. I also have the
    custom function set for "snap" mode with the lens manual focused at
    about 10 feet and f-stop=5.6. When I want to take pictures without
    raising the camera to my eye, I just rotate the dial to the "c"
    picture mode and snap from the waist or hip. It allows for unobtrusive
    snapshots and with 5MP there is some cropping margin if you are not
    planning on a large final print.

    It is still a point and shoot - for me that means that taking fast
    action dance floor pictures at a dark wedding reception will drive
    you/me nuts. Not the camera for that, but for most everything else - I
    find it to be a great street, travel and general purpose snapshot
    camera. It is versatile enough to give you work around's for most any
    situation excepting the very low light photos that require a timely
    shutter release. For the night architectural shots, etc it does just
    fine, it's the "timely" part sometimes called focus or exposure lag
    that prevents you from capturing the precise moment of a low-light
    photo. The "lag" while measurable is usually not a problem for me in
    well lighted photos.

    I find the menus to be very well constructed and with a little
    practice I find myself visiting the menu system very little. I use the
    "auto" mode for when I need a flash. I use the "Av" mode for almost
    everything else and the "C" mode is pre-set to snapshot for no-lag
    street work.

    I sometimes use the strobe compensation when the situation warrants.
    It overexposes a bit (for me) at close range.

    The RAW mode is excellent when you really are trying to crank as much
    detail as possible. I consider RAW my viewfinder mode - when I taking
    the time and effort to make a good photograph. I don't use it for my
    "snap" mode of operation.

    Regards,
    Roger
    Roger, Sep 1, 2004
    #8
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