Need help with decision

Discussion in 'Digital Photography' started by DDDD, Oct 25, 2004.

  1. DDDD

    DDDD Guest

    I currently have an Epson 3100Z with 3.3 Megapixels and it is a surprisingly
    good camera. I take many pictures of my wife's orchids and have a problem
    getting true color on reds and some shades of purple/violet.

    I am going to buy a new camera and plan on spending less than $1000. So
    far, I have narrowed the choices down to a Canon 300D, Sony DSC F828, and a
    Konica/Minolta DiMage A2.

    I also have a film Canon Rebel and have three lenses - an EF 75-300 mm, an
    EF 50 mm, and an EF 35-80 mm. I am assuming that these lens will work on
    the 300D and I really like this camera but am concerned about not having the
    macro settings like the other two cameras. I don't really want to buy
    another lens. I am also a little concerned with the distortion that is
    reported using the macro setting on the F828. I get most of my facts from
    the dpreview.com web site.

    Does anyone on the forum use their camera for a lot of photos of flowers and
    can cite any problems with these cameras or have any solid recommendations
    pro or con.

    Thanks
    DDDD
     
    DDDD, Oct 25, 2004
    #1
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  2. DDDD

    GT40 Guest

    On Mon, 25 Oct 2004 11:01:13 -0400, "DDDD" <> wrote:

    >I currently have an Epson 3100Z with 3.3 Megapixels and it is a surprisingly
    >good camera. I take many pictures of my wife's orchids and have a problem
    >getting true color on reds and some shades of purple/violet.
    >
    >I am going to buy a new camera and plan on spending less than $1000. So
    >far, I have narrowed the choices down to a Canon 300D, Sony DSC F828, and a
    >Konica/Minolta DiMage A2.
    >
    >I also have a film Canon Rebel and have three lenses - an EF 75-300 mm, an
    >EF 50 mm, and an EF 35-80 mm. I am assuming that these lens will work on
    >the 300D and I really like this camera but am concerned about not having the
    >macro settings like the other two cameras. I don't really want to buy
    >another lens. I am also a little concerned with the distortion that is
    >reported using the macro setting on the F828. I get most of my facts from
    >the dpreview.com web site.


    I would get the Canon 300D, you dont have to get a true macro lens,
    you can buy close-up filters or extension tubes, that will give you a
    quasi macro effect.
     
    GT40, Oct 25, 2004
    #2
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  3. DDDD

    bmoag Guest

    If you are comfortable using an SLR then the dSLR will be the most
    versatile, particularly since you already have additional lenses. If one of
    your main interests is flower photography then the longer lenses will be
    very useful.
     
    bmoag, Oct 25, 2004
    #3
  4. "DDDD" <> wrote in message
    news:6b9c0$417d151c$45234f78$...
    >I currently have an Epson 3100Z with 3.3 Megapixels and it is a
    >surprisingly good camera. I take many pictures of my wife's orchids and
    >have a problem getting true color on reds and some shades of purple/violet.


    The colors you see on your computer screen, or in prints, depends on more
    than the camera. If oyu are using an image editing program, check to see if
    iyt has provision to adjust the monitor and to setup the printer. If not,
    check the Web site of the company that made the software. Them ask about it
    again on this site, if thnecessary. If you just take the files to a local
    store for printing, or send them to an online printer, you depend on how
    well they do the job. Buying a new camera may not solve your problem.

    When I set up my daughter's computer for accurate clor rendition, I checked
    how well it worked by taking a picture of some flowers in here graden,
    printing the picture on her printer, and taking it out to compare with the
    flowers. The match was excellent.
    >
    > I am going to buy a new camera and plan on spending less than $1000. So
    > far, I have narrowed the choices down to a Canon 300D, Sony DSC F828, and
    > a Konica/Minolta DiMage A2.
    >
    > I also have a film Canon Rebel and have three lenses - an EF 75-300 mm, an
    > EF 50 mm, and an EF 35-80 mm. I am assuming that these lens will work on
    > the 300D and I really like this camera but am concerned about not having
    > the macro settings like the other two cameras. I don't really want to buy
    > another lens. I am also a little concerned with the distortion that is
    > reported using the macro setting on the F828. I get most of my facts from
    > the dpreview.com web site.
    >
    > Does anyone on the forum use their camera for a lot of photos of flowers
    > and can cite any problems with these cameras or have any solid
    > recommendations pro or con.
    >
    > Thanks
    > DDDD
    >
    >
    >
     
    Marvin Margoshes, Oct 25, 2004
    #4
  5. DDDD

    C J Campbell Guest

    I have the Minolta Dimage A1 and it has many glaring weaknesses, not least
    of which is a considerable amount of digital noise, but this is supposed to
    be not as bad on the A2. It is also fragile, but then I am rough on
    equipment.

    I would go with the Canon 300D. The 'macro' settings on the other cameras
    are really just a type of extension ring; they move a lens element a little
    bit, but the quality is not that of a true macro lens. The advantages of the
    Canon that I can see are that it is easier to get accessories, like extra
    batteries, when you need them, better lenses, and I think a better imaging
    chip.
     
    C J Campbell, Oct 25, 2004
    #5
  6. DDDD

    DDDD Guest

    "Marvin Margoshes" <> wrote in message
    news:...
    >
    > "DDDD" <> wrote in message
    > news:6b9c0$417d151c$45234f78$...
    >>I currently have an Epson 3100Z with 3.3 Megapixels and it is a
    >>surprisingly good camera. I take many pictures of my wife's orchids and
    >>have a problem getting true color on reds and some shades of
    >>purple/violet.

    >
    > The colors you see on your computer screen, or in prints, depends on more
    > than the camera. If oyu are using an image editing program, check to see
    > if iyt has provision to adjust the monitor and to setup the printer. If
    > not, check the Web site of the company that made the software. Them ask
    > about it again on this site, if thnecessary. If you just take the files
    > to a local store for printing, or send them to an online printer, you
    > depend on how well they do the job. Buying a new camera may not solve
    > your problem.
    >
    > When I set up my daughter's computer for accurate clor rendition, I
    > checked how well it worked by taking a picture of some flowers in here
    > graden, printing the picture on her printer, and taking it out to compare
    > with the flowers. The match was excellent.


    I use Photoshop Elements to manipulate photos. I have done what you suggest
    and still have problem, mainly with the reds. Orchids can produce very
    subtle color hues and the deep reds are extra difficult, maybe impossible to
    get a 'true' color match. I never take the files to a store for printing,
    knowing that they can't do the job that I can with the plant available to
    match. I might get an older version of Photoshop to use the tools available
    there, but I just can't see paying the going price for up-to-date versions.
    >>

    snip snip.
    >>
    >> Thanks
    >> DDDD
    >>
    >>
    >>

    >
    >
     
    DDDD, Oct 25, 2004
    #6
  7. DDDD

    DDDD Guest

    "bmoag" <> wrote in message
    news:GV8fd.9851$...
    > If you are comfortable using an SLR then the dSLR will be the most
    > versatile, particularly since you already have additional lenses. If one
    > of your main interests is flower photography then the longer lenses will
    > be very useful.
    >

    When you say the "longer lenses", are you referring to the 75-300 mm? That
    is very awkward to use without the tripos and I am concerned with the
    plastic construction of the 300D bearing the weight of the lens.

    DDDD
     
    DDDD, Oct 25, 2004
    #7
  8. DDDD wrote:
    []
    > I use Photoshop Elements to manipulate photos. I have done what you
    > suggest and still have problem, mainly with the reds. Orchids can
    > produce very subtle color hues and the deep reds are extra difficult,
    > maybe impossible to get a 'true' color match.


    Part of the problem is that the spectral response of our eyes and the
    camera/screen/printer differ, so some colours will not reproduce
    correctly. Some more expensive cameras may do better than cheaper models,
    but you need to check with subjects that matter to you.

    Cheers,
    David
     
    David J Taylor, Oct 25, 2004
    #8
  9. DDDD

    DDDD Guest

    I seem to be slightly leaning in that direction - the 300D I mean. I would
    have the use of the 3 lens that I have and maybe the macro problem can be
    resolved. I just wish that the 300D was black instead of that cheap looking
    silver.

    DDDD

    "C J Campbell" <> wrote in message
    news:...
    >I have the Minolta Dimage A1 and it has many glaring weaknesses, not least
    > of which is a considerable amount of digital noise, but this is supposed
    > to
    > be not as bad on the A2. It is also fragile, but then I am rough on
    > equipment.
    >
    > I would go with the Canon 300D. The 'macro' settings on the other cameras
    > are really just a type of extension ring; they move a lens element a
    > little
    > bit, but the quality is not that of a true macro lens. The advantages of
    > the
    > Canon that I can see are that it is easier to get accessories, like extra
    > batteries, when you need them, better lenses, and I think a better imaging
    > chip.
    >
    >
     
    DDDD, Oct 25, 2004
    #9
  10. DDDD

    George Guest

    "David J Taylor" <-this-bit.nor-this-part.uk>
    wrote in message news:zbbfd.14940$...
    > DDDD wrote:
    > []
    > > I use Photoshop Elements to manipulate photos. I have done what you
    > > suggest and still have problem, mainly with the reds. Orchids can
    > > produce very subtle color hues and the deep reds are extra difficult,
    > > maybe impossible to get a 'true' color match.

    >
    > Part of the problem is that the spectral response of our eyes and the
    > camera/screen/printer differ, so some colours will not reproduce
    > correctly. Some more expensive cameras may do better than cheaper models,
    > but you need to check with subjects that matter to you.
    >
    > Cheers,
    > David
    >
    >

    Before you just start throwing money at your problem, why don't you check it
    out a bit more thoroughly? From what you said in an earlier posting, I
    assume
    that you are printing at home on an inkjet printer. Why don't you give
    Ofoto.com
    and Wal-Mart a try? That way you'll get to see how digital silver halide
    and dye
    sublimation prints look. I'd suspect that the digital camera probably has
    the least
    effect on your prints of almost anything in the chain...there are only a few
    companies
    making the sensors that the camera manufacturers use in their cameras.
     
    George, Nov 1, 2004
    #10
  11. DDDD

    DDDD Guest

    "George" <> wrote in message
    news:...
    >
    > "David J Taylor"
    > <-this-bit.nor-this-part.uk>
    > wrote in message news:zbbfd.14940$...
    >> DDDD wrote:
    >> []
    >> > I use Photoshop Elements to manipulate photos. I have done what you
    >> > suggest and still have problem, mainly with the reds. Orchids can
    >> > produce very subtle color hues and the deep reds are extra difficult,
    >> > maybe impossible to get a 'true' color match.

    >>
    >> Part of the problem is that the spectral response of our eyes and the
    >> camera/screen/printer differ, so some colours will not reproduce
    >> correctly. Some more expensive cameras may do better than cheaper
    >> models,
    >> but you need to check with subjects that matter to you.
    >>
    >> Cheers,
    >> David
    >>
    >>

    > Before you just start throwing money at your problem, why don't you check
    > it
    > out a bit more thoroughly? From what you said in an earlier posting, I
    > assume
    > that you are printing at home on an inkjet printer. Why don't you give
    > Ofoto.com
    > and Wal-Mart a try? That way you'll get to see how digital silver halide
    > and dye
    > sublimation prints look. I'd suspect that the digital camera probably has
    > the least
    > effect on your prints of almost anything in the chain...there are only a
    > few
    > companies
    > making the sensors that the camera manufacturers use in their cameras.
    >
    >


    Thanks, I'll try a couple of prints there.

    DDDD
     
    DDDD, Nov 1, 2004
    #11
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