Need Help Band Pictures Olympus C- 3020

Discussion in 'Digital Photography' started by Joni, Dec 19, 2003.

  1. Joni

    Joni Guest

    I need to take pictures of musicians in a band. This is indoor at
    night, in bars, with several difference low light sources, coming from
    different directions. I have tried turning off the flash and fixing
    with photo editing and that part is ok.

    My problem seems that the lens is open to long and I get lots of
    blurred pictures. I have tried steadying on a chair or table, but most
    pictures are taken with dancers around me, so I have to be able to
    move quickly. I also need to be able to move about and take individual
    shots of the players.

    I have read & re-read my instruction booklet and cannot find the right
    settings for this.

    Grateful for any help or comments.
    Joni
    Indianapolis, IN
     
    Joni, Dec 19, 2003
    #1
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  2. Joni

    Mike Guest

    1600-speed film

    or 3200-speed B&W film


    Joni wrote:
    > I need to take pictures of musicians in a band. This is indoor at
    > night, in bars, with several difference low light sources, coming from
    > different directions. I have tried turning off the flash and fixing
    > with photo editing and that part is ok.
    >
    > My problem seems that the lens is open to long and I get lots of
    > blurred pictures. I have tried steadying on a chair or table, but most
    > pictures are taken with dancers around me, so I have to be able to
    > move quickly. I also need to be able to move about and take individual
    > shots of the players.
    >
    > I have read & re-read my instruction booklet and cannot find the right
    > settings for this.
    >
    > Grateful for any help or comments.
    > Joni
    > Indianapolis, IN
     
    Mike, Dec 19, 2003
    #2
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  3. << My problem seems that the lens is open to long and I get lots of
    blurred pictures. I have tried steadying on a chair or table, but most
    pictures are taken with dancers around me, so I have to be able to
    move quickly. I also need to be able to move about and take individual
    shots of the players. >>

    Joni-

    I have the C-3040Z, which has an external flash connector on the side. I use
    the Olympus flash bracket and handle, with the Olympus FL-40 flash. With a
    more powerful flash located further from the lens axis, I can light a larger
    area and have a bit less trouble with red-eye. While I may not have any
    experience in your environment, some of my band shots have been OK, at least as
    far as exposure is concerned.

    For non-flash shots, try forcing the ISO rating to a higher value. However,
    slow shutter speeds and resulting blur are to be expected in low light. You
    might try using the effect creatively.

    I wonder if you aren't just being too critical of your results? Many pros get
    good results from only a fraction of their shots. If you continue trying
    different ideas, your percentage of good shots should increase, but not likely
    to 100%. Digital film is cheap!

    Fred
     
    Fred McKenzie, Dec 19, 2003
    #3
  4. "Joni" <> wrote in message
    news:...
    > I need to take pictures of musicians in a band. This is indoor at
    > night, in bars, with several difference low light sources, coming from
    > different directions. I have tried turning off the flash and fixing
    > with photo editing and that part is ok.
    >
    > My problem seems that the lens is open to long and I get lots of
    > blurred pictures. I have tried steadying on a chair or table, but most
    > pictures are taken with dancers around me, so I have to be able to
    > move quickly. I also need to be able to move about and take individual
    > shots of the players.
    >
    > I have read & re-read my instruction booklet and cannot find the right
    > settings for this.
    >
    > Grateful for any help or comments.
    > Joni
    > Indianapolis, IN


    A tripod seems not to be possible if you are standing in with dancers,
    unless you can get them to cooperate. A monopod might work. I've taken
    some OK low-light pictures with the help of a monopod.
     
    Marvin Margoshes, Dec 19, 2003
    #4
  5. Joni

    Jimmy Guest

    Cute!

    "Mike" <> wrote in message news:3fe33563$0$9097$...
    > 1600-speed film
    >
    > or 3200-speed B&W film
    >
    >
     
    Jimmy, Dec 19, 2003
    #5
  6. Joni

    jpc Guest

    On 19 Dec 2003 08:57:15 -0800, (Joni) wrote:

    >I need to take pictures of musicians in a band. This is indoor at
    >night, in bars, with several difference low light sources, coming from
    >different directions. I have tried turning off the flash and fixing
    >with photo editing and that part is ok.
    >
    >My problem seems that the lens is open to long and I get lots of
    >blurred pictures. I have tried steadying on a chair or table, but most
    >pictures are taken with dancers around me, so I have to be able to
    >move quickly. I also need to be able to move about and take individual
    >shots of the players.
    >


    I have 3020 and these are my settings for low light bar and band
    pictures

    ISO 400
    Manual mode
    aperture 2.8
    shutter speed as slow as I can get away with and not have totally
    unexceptable blurring
    Sometimes I also set the focus manually to about 2/3 the distance from
    where I am to the stage. Since the depth of field of the 3020 is very
    good and at these light levels I'm not going to take super sharp
    pictures anyway this cuts the shutter lag to almost nothing and avoids
    the problems of autofocusing at very low light levels.

    Usually I end up with some very dark pictures that I have to fix with
    photoediting by expanding the levels, adjusting the brightness and
    contrast, and using some noise reduction techniques. Then I usally
    convert them to black and white before printing.

    hope this helps

    jpc
     
    jpc, Dec 19, 2003
    #6
  7. Joni wrote:

    >I need to take pictures of musicians in a band. This is indoor at
    >night, in bars, with several difference low light sources, coming from
    >different directions. I have tried turning off the flash and fixing
    >with photo editing and that part is ok.
    >
    >My problem seems that the lens is open to long and I get lots of
    >blurred pictures. I have tried steadying on a chair or table, but most
    >pictures are taken with dancers around me, so I have to be able to
    >move quickly. I also need to be able to move about and take individual
    >shots of the players.
    >
    >I have read & re-read my instruction booklet and cannot find the right
    >settings for this.
    >
    >Grateful for any help or comments.
    >Joni
    >Indianapolis, IN
    >
    >

    I was trying to do band shots with my old Toshiba PDR-M4. It didn't have
    any controls whatsoever.Generally unacceptable shots IMHO. In September
    I purchased a Canon Digital Rebel. Since then I have been able to get
    some fantastic shots.

    Manual camera settings.
    ISO 1600
    f/2-f/4
    1/50-1/80 shutter
    EF 50mm 1.8 lens

    This has been by far the most difficult of situations for me to shoot
    in. Low light calls for high ISO which in turn gives noisy images. It
    also calls for wide open or near wide open lens aperature which lowers
    the sharpness of the lens and puts the depth of field at near 6 inches
    if I'm lucky. Any slower than 1/60 shutter speed and you get motion
    blur. I have found a tripod impossible to use and a monopod useable, but
    very limiting as I'm then fussing with the monopod for different angles.
    If light is extremely limited I've even had to focus manually.
    Check out what I've gotten so far.
    http://home.comcast.net/~thomasgarner2/
    <http://home.comcast.net/%7Ethomasgarner2/>
    Tom
     
    Thomas Garner, Dec 20, 2003
    #7
  8. Joni

    JK Guest

    You need a camera with better low light capabilities. A Digital Rebel
    using the 1600 ISO mode with a 50mm f1.8 lens would be good for
    shooting in low light.

    Joni wrote:

    > I need to take pictures of musicians in a band. This is indoor at
    > night, in bars, with several difference low light sources, coming from
    > different directions. I have tried turning off the flash and fixing
    > with photo editing and that part is ok.
    >
    > My problem seems that the lens is open to long and I get lots of
    > blurred pictures. I have tried steadying on a chair or table, but most
    > pictures are taken with dancers around me, so I have to be able to
    > move quickly. I also need to be able to move about and take individual
    > shots of the players.
    >
    > I have read & re-read my instruction booklet and cannot find the right
    > settings for this.
    >
    > Grateful for any help or comments.
    > Joni
    > Indianapolis, IN
     
    JK, Dec 20, 2003
    #8
  9. Joni

    VT Guest

    On 19 Dec 2003 08:57:15 -0800, (Joni) wrote:

    >I need to take pictures of musicians in a band. This is indoor at
    >night, in bars, with several difference low light sources, coming from
    >different directions. I have tried turning off the flash and fixing
    >with photo editing and that part is ok.
    >


    The main problem is the varying lighting levels - more importantly the
    low light.

    I'm assuming you don't particularly want to buy a whole new camera to
    do this......many have already given good advice.

    I do a lot of this stuff, initially I used a simple Canon S100 Digital
    ELPH (hardly any manual control/overrides) for over 3 years, and now
    with a Canon A70 (more versatile - but nothing that makes it better
    for this kind of photography over your digicam)

    (0) Camera Settings -
    If your camera has aperture priority - use that and set the lens to
    maximum aperture (f/2.8?) and set the highest acceptable quality ISO
    (ISO400?) the camera will then select the highest available shutter
    speed for the situation.......

    (1) Steady Camera hold -

    Simply because of mobility often a tripod or even monopod are just not
    practical - so one has to learn to to hold the camera very still
    including follow-through (ie: until one is certain the shutter has
    finally completely closed).

    This means the popular "cool" arms length hold pre-viewing via the LCD
    or even worse the "one hand" hold - are OUT.

    I use the optical eye-level viewfinder EXCLUSIVELY to take advantage
    of the third point of support of the camera pressed against my face.

    Then look for any support - like ther stage, monitor speakers etc and
    brace the elbows to form one's own "tripod" - if those are not
    avialable anything that helps support the body.

    This helps minimize camera movement......BUT

    (2) Subject Movement -
    musicans move and the best shots are often are animated - so there
    will often be some blur. Freezing the moment might be OK - you can do
    this with Flash if you're close enough - but that loses a lot of the
    stage "atmosphere". Some blur actually can make great photos since
    the photo is no longer static/frozen looking. One technique that I
    had a lot of success with is using "Slow-Sync" or "Night Portrait"
    Flash - which freezes an image of the closer subject but keeps the
    shutter open to expose for the background/stage. It is safer to use
    the steady camera hold - but sometimes when support is not available
    some camera movement may actually yield good results - like panning
    the subject (that is keep following the motion of the subject - so
    parts are sharp while brightly lit parts are blurred).

    (3) Blurred Pictures - more camera settings
    Hopefully the above will yeild higher percentage of sharper pictures -
    but if you really don't like the blurred effect (I love them, but I
    understand if YMMV) - try using Shutter Priority - set the shutter
    speed to the lowest you feel comfortable/confident in holding - try
    1/4sec and faster like 1/8, 1/15, 1/30....etc - and see if the images
    are less blurred - they may be UNDERexposed - but one may be able to
    help these by post-processing - by increasing brightness/contrast.

    Or simply get closer and resort to normal Flash - but I feel the
    images then are too static and don't really convey the dynamics of the
    scene.

    Here are some shots using above techniques (mostly Canon A70 - AutoISO
    = probably ISO50 - slow sync flash)

    Blind Boys of Alabama:
    http://blindboys.com/pictures/
    top row of photos (Canon S100)

    The Motet
    http://www.themotet.net/Oct_09_2003_Atlanta.htm

    Skeric (Les Claypool's Frog Brigade, Garage-A-Trois with Charlie
    Hunter and Stanton Moore)
    http://skerik.org/gallery/jake1115

    Greyhounds (East Texas Funk & Soul)
    http://greyhoundsmusic.com/atlanta pics.htm

    Captain Soular Cat
    http://www.brefrow.com/Soularcat/radio/

    Hope this helps a little
    --
    Vincent
    remove CLOTHES for e-mail

    http://UnknownVincent.cjb.net/
     
    VT, Dec 20, 2003
    #9
  10. Joni

    Mark Johnson Guest

    (Joni) wrote:

    >I need to take pictures of musicians in a band. This is indoor at
    >night, in bars, with several difference low light sources, coming from
    >different directions. I have tried turning off the flash and fixing
    >with photo editing and that part is ok.


    Went to a recent concert with a C4040 I'd had for just a day. Went
    with flash, ISO 200, s800 and f2.6, so it reads on the exif. And it
    came out great. Not much noise at all. The shot was probably 30 feet
    away at that, and the performers lit only by the spot and stage
    lights. Otherwise, it was dark in the arena.
     
    Mark Johnson, Dec 20, 2003
    #10
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