Need a way to see employeed surfing habits

Discussion in 'Wireless Networking' started by Paul, May 11, 2009.

  1. Paul

    Paul Guest

    Hi, sorry if this in't the best the wrong group for this query. I've
    been asked to find software that will see what websites our 25
    employees are going to. Does anyone know any software that's good for
    this purpose?

    I do not want to have to install anything on the workstations
    themselves unless absolutely neccessary. I don't need full on
    keylogging or anything either - just simply websites viewed.

    Also just to complicate things further, the workstations are XP,
    Vista, and OSx too. Is there something that just scans port 80
    perhaps that would do the job? I'm using a BT Business router that
    can't log websites vistied. I don't want to install ISA either
    really.

    Any help would be greatly appreciated. Thanks
     
    Paul, May 11, 2009
    #1
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  2. Paul

    Rob Moir Guest

    "Paul" <> wrote in message
    news:...
    > Hi, sorry if this in't the best the wrong group for this query. I've
    > been asked to find software that will see what websites our 25
    > employees are going to. Does anyone know any software that's good for
    > this purpose?
    >
    > I do not want to have to install anything on the workstations
    > themselves unless absolutely neccessary. I don't need full on
    > keylogging or anything either - just simply websites viewed.
    >
    > Also just to complicate things further, the workstations are XP,
    > Vista, and OSx too. Is there something that just scans port 80
    > perhaps that would do the job? I'm using a BT Business router that
    > can't log websites vistied. I don't want to install ISA either
    > really.
    >
    > Any help would be greatly appreciated. Thanks


    It really does sound like you need a proxy of some kind.
    Squid is still free, I think.
     
    Rob Moir, May 11, 2009
    #2
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  3. Paul

    smlunatick Guest

    On May 11, 5:22 pm, Paul <> wrote:
    > Hi, sorry if this in't the best the wrong group for this query.  I've
    > been asked to find software that will see what websites our 25
    > employees are going to.  Does anyone know any software that's good for
    > this purpose?
    >
    > I do not want to have to install anything on the workstations
    > themselves unless absolutely neccessary.  I don't need full on
    > keylogging or anything either - just simply websites viewed.
    >
    > Also just to complicate things further, the workstations are XP,
    > Vista, and OSx too.  Is there something that just scans port 80
    > perhaps that would do the job?  I'm using a BT Business router that
    > can't log websites vistied.  I don't want to install ISA either
    > really.
    >
    > Any help would be greatly appreciated.   Thanks


    I do not know of any softeare but I do know of a hardware device that
    will monitor all Internet activity. The freeGuard Capture line of
    products, from Freedom9, will monitor all"

    web urls
    emails sent / received -- POP, IMAP, SMTP
    instant messenger sessions.
    telnet "login" sessions
    FTP transfers

    No software required.
    Not a "proxy" -- can be set up as a "transparent" pass-thorough
    monitor.

    Not sure what is your "budget."
     
    smlunatick, May 11, 2009
    #3
  4. "Paul" <> wrote in message
    news:...
    > perhaps that would do the job? I'm using a BT Business router that


    Not much of a "business router" then. Actually if it was really a
    "commercial grade" product they wouldn't be calling it a "router" since that
    is the "home user" abuse of the term. They are not "routers".

    > can't log websites vistied. I don't want to install ISA either
    > really.


    ISA does not do that either,...not in the kind of "big brother" details you
    want. The logging does contain all the information,...but the Reporting
    Features just aren't designed in that way,...they are design for creating
    Summaries (like Top 10 Users,...Top 10 Visited Sites, etc.)

    To get detailed reporting with ISA requires buying third party add-ons
    ($,$$$.$$) to perform that. There are serveral out there, but they all have
    their problems and deficiencies, and they all can make a mess out of your
    ISA if you aren't carefull.

    All commerical level Firewalls log everything,...but the ability to create a
    report from the logs and the details of such a report will vary greatly
    between products. But I cannot speak for any other than ISA Server.

    --
    Phillip Windell
    www.wandtv.com

    The views expressed, are my own and not those of my employer, or Microsoft,
    or anyone else associated with me, including my cats.
    -----------------------------------------------------
    Technet Library
    ISA2004
    http://technet.microsoft.com/en-us/library/cc302436(TechNet.10).aspx
    ISA2006
    http://technet.microsoft.com/en-us/library/bb898433(TechNet.10).aspx

    Understanding the ISA 2004 Access Rule Processing
    http://www.isaserver.org/articles/ISA2004_AccessRules.html

    Troubleshooting Client Authentication on Access Rules in ISA Server 2004
    http://download.microsoft.com/download/9/1/8/918ed2d3-71d0-40ed-8e6d-fd6eeb6cfa07/ts_rules.doc

    Microsoft Internet Security & Acceleration Server: Partners
    http://www.microsoft.com/isaserver/partners/default.mspx

    Microsoft ISA Server Partners: Partner Hardware Solutions
    http://www.microsoft.com/forefront/edgesecurity/partners/hardwarepartners.mspx
    -----------------------------------------------------
     
    Phillip Windell, May 11, 2009
    #4
  5. Paul

    Leroy Guest

    IamBigBrother Internet Monitoring Software:
    http://www.iambigbrother.com/


    Paul wrote:
    > Hi, sorry if this in't the best the wrong group for this query. I've
    > been asked to find software that will see what websites our 25
    > employees are going to. Does anyone know any software that's good for
    > this purpose?
    >
    > I do not want to have to install anything on the workstations
    > themselves unless absolutely neccessary. I don't need full on
    > keylogging or anything either - just simply websites viewed.
    >
    > Also just to complicate things further, the workstations are XP,
    > Vista, and OSx too. Is there something that just scans port 80
    > perhaps that would do the job? I'm using a BT Business router that
    > can't log websites vistied. I don't want to install ISA either
    > really.
    >
    > Any help would be greatly appreciated. Thanks
     
    Leroy, May 11, 2009
    #5
  6. Paul

    Malke Guest

    Paul wrote:

    > Hi, sorry if this in't the best the wrong group for this query. I've
    > been asked to find software that will see what websites our 25
    > employees are going to. Does anyone know any software that's good for
    > this purpose?
    >
    > I do not want to have to install anything on the workstations
    > themselves unless absolutely neccessary. I don't need full on
    > keylogging or anything either - just simply websites viewed.
    >
    > Also just to complicate things further, the workstations are XP,
    > Vista, and OSx too. Is there something that just scans port 80
    > perhaps that would do the job? I'm using a BT Business router that
    > can't log websites vistied. I don't want to install ISA either
    > really.
    >
    > Any help would be greatly appreciated. Thanks


    eBlaster
    http://www.spectorsoft.com/

    Malke
    --
    MS-MVP
    Elephant Boy Computers - Don't Panic!
    http://www.elephantboycomputers.com/#FAQ
     
    Malke, May 11, 2009
    #6
  7. Paul

    Mel K. Guest

    You need to install a Web filter system/appliance. Also, note that there are
    some issues with filtering https traffic (because https is encrypted). There
    are several systems available, so just review some of them. Search for "web
    filter."

    If all you want to do is see which Web sites employees are visiting, you
    could view your DNS server cache, but that doesn't tell you which user went
    to which site, and trying to come up with a meaning report could be very
    time consuming.

    --
    Thank you,
    Mel K.
    MCSA: M

    "Paul" <> wrote in message
    news:...
    > Hi, sorry if this in't the best the wrong group for this query. I've
    > been asked to find software that will see what websites our 25
    > employees are going to. Does anyone know any software that's good for
    > this purpose?
    >
    > I do not want to have to install anything on the workstations
    > themselves unless absolutely neccessary. I don't need full on
    > keylogging or anything either - just simply websites viewed.
    >
    > Also just to complicate things further, the workstations are XP,
    > Vista, and OSx too. Is there something that just scans port 80
    > perhaps that would do the job? I'm using a BT Business router that
    > can't log websites vistied. I don't want to install ISA either
    > really.
    >
    > Any help would be greatly appreciated. Thanks
     
    Mel K., May 11, 2009
    #7
  8. In article <>,
    Mel K. <> wrote:
    >You need to install a Web filter system/appliance. Also, note that there are


    He could use Snort for this.
     
    the wharf rat, May 11, 2009
    #8
  9. Paul

    Peter Foldes Guest

    Paul

    I have used the following before with good results

    http://www.squid-cache.org/Download/

    --
    Peter

    Please Reply to Newsgroup for the benefit of others
    Requests for assistance by email can not and will not be acknowledged.

    "Paul" <> wrote in message
    news:...
    > Hi, sorry if this in't the best the wrong group for this query. I've
    > been asked to find software that will see what websites our 25
    > employees are going to. Does anyone know any software that's good for
    > this purpose?
    >
    > I do not want to have to install anything on the workstations
    > themselves unless absolutely neccessary. I don't need full on
    > keylogging or anything either - just simply websites viewed.
    >
    > Also just to complicate things further, the workstations are XP,
    > Vista, and OSx too. Is there something that just scans port 80
    > perhaps that would do the job? I'm using a BT Business router that
    > can't log websites vistied. I don't want to install ISA either
    > really.
    >
    > Any help would be greatly appreciated. Thanks
     
    Peter Foldes, May 12, 2009
    #9
  10. Paul wrote:
    > Hi, sorry if this in't the best the wrong group for this query. I've
    > been asked to find software that will see what websites our 25
    > employees are going to. Does anyone know any software that's good for
    > this purpose?
    >
    > I do not want to have to install anything on the workstations
    > themselves unless absolutely neccessary. I don't need full on
    > keylogging or anything either - just simply websites viewed.
    >
    > Also just to complicate things further, the workstations are XP,
    > Vista, and OSx too. Is there something that just scans port 80
    > perhaps that would do the job? I'm using a BT Business router that
    > can't log websites vistied. I don't want to install ISA either
    > really.
    >
    > Any help would be greatly appreciated. Thanks



    Your proxy server should include this capability; it's a fairly
    standard feature.


    --

    Bruce Chambers

    Help us help you:
    http://www.catb.org/~esr/faqs/smart-questions.html

    http://support.microsoft.com/default.aspx/kb/555375

    They that can give up essential liberty to obtain a little temporary
    safety deserve neither liberty nor safety. ~Benjamin Franklin

    Many people would rather die than think; in fact, most do. ~Bertrand Russell

    The philosopher has never killed any priests, whereas the priest has
    killed a great many philosophers.
    ~ Denis Diderot
     
    Bruce Chambers, May 12, 2009
    #10
  11. Paul

    Guest

    We use SafeSquid as content filtering proxy at our office. To get
    detailed per-user usage reports, we have installed the open source log
    analyzer - Sarg. You can generate daily / weekly / monthly log reports
    that displays the websites visited by each user (ID or IP), total time
    & bytes consumed, time & bytes consumed on each site, files
    downloaded, top users, top sites, etc. etc. There are lots of other
    open source log analyzers, but I don't know if they work on Windows,
    except Sarg, Calamaris & AWStats.
     
    , May 12, 2009
    #11
  12. Paul

    Jon Guest

    Start by showing all your employees exactly which websites *YOU* have been
    visiting over the last month - warts n all. Accountable leadership I believe
    it's called.

    --
    Jon

    Just Say No
    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=EehZHNvLJuo





    "Paul" <> wrote in message
    news:...
    > Hi, sorry if this in't the best the wrong group for this query. I've
    > been asked to find software that will see what websites our 25
    > employees are going to. Does anyone know any software that's good for
    > this purpose?
    >
    > I do not want to have to install anything on the workstations
    > themselves unless absolutely neccessary. I don't need full on
    > keylogging or anything either - just simply websites viewed.
    >
    > Also just to complicate things further, the workstations are XP,
    > Vista, and OSx too. Is there something that just scans port 80
    > perhaps that would do the job? I'm using a BT Business router that
    > can't log websites vistied. I don't want to install ISA either
    > really.
    >
    > Any help would be greatly appreciated. Thanks
     
    Jon, May 12, 2009
    #12
  13. Paul

    Default Guest

    "Phillip Windell" <> wrote in message
    news:%...
    > "Paul" <> wrote in message
    > news:...
    > > perhaps that would do the job? I'm using a BT Business router that

    >
    > Not much of a "business router" then. Actually if it was really a
    > "commercial grade" product they wouldn't be calling it a "router" since

    that
    > is the "home user" abuse of the term. They are not "routers".
    >


    Bollocks - http://www.cisco.com/en/US/products/hw/routers/ps368/index.html
     
    Default, May 12, 2009
    #13
  14. Paul

    +Bob+ Guest

    On Tue, 12 May 2009 09:04:34 +0100, "Jon"
    <> wrote:

    >Start by showing all your employees exactly which websites *YOU* have been
    >visiting over the last month - warts n all. Accountable leadership I believe
    >it's called.
    >
    >--
    >Jon


    I'd go a little further.

    1. Start by telling management that they are using an archaic
    management style generally known as "theory X". With that style of
    management, managers believe that employees are generally lazy and
    won't work hard unless strictly supervised under a narrow set of rules
    designed to keep their noses to the grindstone. Suggest that they go
    look up "Theory Y" and learn what most smart companies figured out
    about 40 years ago regarding motivating employees and obtaining
    maximum performance.

    2. Go prepare your resume. You don't want to work for a bunch of dolts
    that spend their time worrying about what web sites employees are
    browsing instead of concentrating on serving the company's customers.
     
    +Bob+, May 12, 2009
    #14
  15. "+Bob+" <> wrote in message
    news:...
    > On Tue, 12 May 2009 09:04:34 +0100, "Jon"
    > <> wrote:
    >
    >>Start by showing all your employees exactly which websites *YOU* have been
    >>visiting over the last month - warts n all. Accountable leadership I
    >>believe
    >>it's called.
    >>
    >>--
    >>Jon

    >
    > I'd go a little further.
    >
    > 1. Start by telling management that they are using an archaic
    > management style generally known as "theory X". With that style of
    > management, managers believe that employees are generally lazy and
    > won't work hard unless strictly supervised under a narrow set of rules
    > designed to keep their noses to the grindstone. Suggest that they go
    > look up "Theory Y" and learn what most smart companies figured out
    > about 40 years ago regarding motivating employees and obtaining
    > maximum performance.
    >
    > 2. Go prepare your resume. You don't want to work for a bunch of dolts
    > that spend their time worrying about what web sites employees are
    > browsing instead of concentrating on serving the company's customers.
    >
    >
    >


    +BOB+ - I'll bet you don't have that problem at Jack-In-The-Box, do you?
    All you need to know is when to remove the fries from the fryer. LOL!
     
    measekite Da Monkey, May 12, 2009
    #15
  16. Paul

    Jon Guest

    "+Bob+" <> wrote in message
    news:...

    > I'd go a little further.
    >
    > 1. Start by telling management that they are using an archaic
    > management style generally known as "theory X". With that style of
    > management, managers believe that employees are generally lazy and
    > won't work hard unless strictly supervised under a narrow set of rules
    > designed to keep their noses to the grindstone. Suggest that they go
    > look up "Theory Y" and learn what most smart companies figured out
    > about 40 years ago regarding motivating employees and obtaining
    > maximum performance.
    >
    > 2. Go prepare your resume. You don't want to work for a bunch of dolts
    > that spend their time worrying about what web sites employees are
    > browsing instead of concentrating on serving the company's customers.
    >




    Yep, it's tyrannical 'Henry Ford style' 'theory x' "you can have any website
    you like as long we approve of it" management at its worst. Penalising any
    bright sparks who decide to think outside of the box; who find solutions in
    obscure portions of the www that management doesn't anticipate.

    In times gone by such non-brainwashed people would be hailed as a heros /
    heroines. Now, they're labelled as 'dangerous', and wheeled off to the
    dismissal room as an 'enemies of the corporation'.

    Judge employees by their *performance* and by who gets *results*, rather
    than seeking to stifle their mental freedom. The more intelligent and
    valuable employees will be thinking outside of the box anyway.

    I'd certainly be preparing my resume, and looking longingly at the exit
    door, if I were working there.

    Poor employees.

    --
    Jon

    Just Say No
    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=EehZHNvLJuo
     
    Jon, May 12, 2009
    #16
  17. Paul

    Mel K. Guest

    Yeah, that would work too.

    --
    Thank you,
    Mel K.
    MCSA: M
    "the wharf rat" <> wrote in message
    news:gu9vdp$im4$...
    > In article <>,
    > Mel K. <> wrote:
    >>You need to install a Web filter system/appliance. Also, note that there
    >>are

    >
    > He could use Snort for this.
    >
     
    Mel K., May 12, 2009
    #17
  18. In article <>,
    Jon <> wrote:
    >
    >Yep, it's tyrannical 'Henry Ford style' 'theory x' "you can have any website
    >you like as long we approve of it" management at its worst. Penalising any
    >bright sparks who decide to think outside of the box; who find solutions in
    >obscure portions of the www that management doesn't anticipate.


    That's nonsense. First of all, you have no right as an employee
    to use the employer network for any purpose not specifically allowed,
    nor do you have an automatic right of privacy. If I lend you my car
    on the condition that you only use premium gas am I being a tyrannical
    manager? You're free to go borrow someone else's car you know.

    Secondly, in today's legal climate if I accidentally glimpse
    you accidentally viewing a website I consider offensive it can leave the
    employer liable for the subsequent civil suit. Don't blame your
    management. Blame the people who insist on legislating your right to profit
    from being offended.

    Lastly, depending on the nature of the work there may be real
    security issues involved. Think of working for one of those three letter
    government agencies.

    The bottom line is that unless you're a star or a relative you work
    for someone on their terms, and those terms are niether good nor evil but
    simply their control of their own private property.
     
    the wharf rat, May 12, 2009
    #18
  19. Paul

    Jon Guest

    "the wharf rat" <> wrote in message
    news:gucrjf$bkr$...
    > In article <>,
    > Jon <> wrote:


    > That's nonsense. First of all, you have no right as an employee
    > to use the employer network for any purpose not specifically allowed,
    > nor do you have an automatic right of privacy. If I lend you my car
    > on the condition that you only use premium gas am I being a tyrannical
    > manager? You're free to go borrow someone else's car you know.



    'Tyranny', using your car analogy, would go beyond following basic
    instructions like deciding which fuel is put into the vehicle. It would be
    putting tracking devices that log every movement of that driver + car
    (conditions under which many work today). Big difference.

    People have been driving goods + people successfully from A to B since the
    invention of the motor car without such Big Brother devices. And yes you do
    have a right to basic human privacy, which isn't something given to you by
    your employer, nor something for which you need to ask their permission.


    >
    > Secondly, in today's legal climate if I accidentally glimpse
    > you accidentally viewing a website I consider offensive it can leave the
    > employer liable for the subsequent civil suit. Don't blame your
    > management. Blame the people who insist on legislating your right to
    > profit
    > from being offended.
    >
    > Lastly, depending on the nature of the work there may be real
    > security issues involved. Think of working for one of those three letter
    > government agencies.
    >
    > The bottom line is that unless you're a star or a relative you work
    > for someone on their terms, and those terms are niether good nor evil but
    > simply their control of their own private property.
    >



    A crime is a crime anywhere, whether it's committed in the workplace or not.

    Whose property is used isn't the issue. If an employee murders a colleague
    in the workplace using a knife from the employer's kitchen, it's that
    employee who is held accountable, and not the employer.

    The only 100% way to protect from workplace crimes would be to not employ
    anyone in the first place. It comes down to trust and employing the right
    people .

    --
    Jon

    Just Say No
    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=EehZHNvLJuo
     
    Jon, May 12, 2009
    #19
  20. In article <#>,
    Jon <> wrote:
    >
    >'Tyranny', using your car analogy, would go beyond following basic
    >instructions like deciding which fuel is put into the vehicle. It would be
    >putting tracking devices that log every movement of that driver + car


    How can that be tyrannical? It's my car! Tyrannical would be
    putting those things in YOUR car.

    >A crime is a crime anywhere, whether it's committed in the workplace or not.


    No, for instance, you can't breach your fiduciary responsibiliy
    to your cat... Well, assuming that your cat isn't a stockholder...

    >Whose property is used isn't the issue. If an employee murders a colleague
    >in the workplace using a knife from the employer's kitchen, it's that
    >employee who is held accountable, and not the employer.


    Actually that's less than completely true. The legal
    principle involved is called "respondeat superior" and imposes
    a certain amount of vicarious liability on an employer.
     
    the wharf rat, May 13, 2009
    #20
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