neat I want one....!

Discussion in 'NZ Computing' started by thingy, Jul 24, 2005.

  1. thingy

    thingy Guest

    thingy, Jul 24, 2005
    #1
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  2. thingy

    Enkidu Guest

    Enkidu, Jul 24, 2005
    #2
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  3. thingy

    riff Guest

    "Enkidu" <> wrote in message
    news:...
    > thingy wrote:
    > >
    >> http://www.msnbc.msn.com/id/8656746/
    >>

    > Didn't those appear on StarWars:
    >
    > http://www.ningyoushi.com/product/PO008
    >
    > Cheers,
    >
    > Cliff

    They would be awesome for people with muscle wasting illnesses or Multiple
    Sclerosis or any number of neurological/muscle type illnesses. Can't wait
    for Pharmac to pick up the tab lol.
    Riff
    riff, Jul 25, 2005
    #3
  4. thingy

    Ray Greene Guest

    Ray Greene, Jul 25, 2005
    #4
  5. thingy

    thing2 Guest

    riff wrote:
    > "Enkidu" <> wrote in message
    > news:...
    >
    >>thingy wrote:
    >>
    >>>http://www.msnbc.msn.com/id/8656746/
    >>>

    >>
    >>Didn't those appear on StarWars:
    >>
    >>http://www.ningyoushi.com/product/PO008
    >>
    >>Cheers,
    >>
    >>Cliff

    >
    > They would be awesome for people with muscle wasting illnesses or Multiple
    > Sclerosis or any number of neurological/muscle type illnesses. Can't wait
    > for Pharmac to pick up the tab lol.
    > Riff
    >
    >
    >


    Even using them in labour intensive applications to prevent back injury,
    or getting people with back injuries back into work....

    You could limit the suits multiplication for say a back suffers and
    decrease this as their problem corrects.

    regards

    Thing
    thing2, Jul 25, 2005
    #5
  6. In article <>,
    thing2 <> wrote:

    >Even using them in labour intensive applications to prevent back injury,
    >or getting people with back injuries back into work....


    Let me predict that, in keeping with the Law of Unintended Consequences,
    they would be likely to lead to _new_ kinds of injuries?

    I'm thinking the RSI kind. Since suits like these make it so easy to
    exert a great deal of strength, people will be more likely to do so over
    and over. Such repetition can lead to its own kinds of damage.
    Lawrence D'Oliveiro, Jul 26, 2005
    #6
  7. thingy

    thingy Guest

    Lawrence D'Oliveiro wrote:
    > In article <>,
    > thing2 <> wrote:
    >
    >
    >>Even using them in labour intensive applications to prevent back injury,
    >>or getting people with back injuries back into work....

    >
    >
    > Let me predict that, in keeping with the Law of Unintended Consequences,
    > they would be likely to lead to _new_ kinds of injuries?
    >
    > I'm thinking the RSI kind. Since suits like these make it so easy to
    > exert a great deal of strength, people will be more likely to do so over
    > and over. Such repetition can lead to its own kinds of damage.



    RSi is usually a small repetative movement suffered by office workers.
    While I guess this could cause that in Labourers I wouldnt think it
    unlikely. It appears to have advantages, in reducing injuries plus wear
    and tear labourers suffer from during their working life, especially
    after 40. It may also lead to people thinking they are invincible, which
    could be very bad.

    regards

    Thing
    thingy, Jul 30, 2005
    #7
  8. In article <>,
    thingy <> wrote:

    >Lawrence D'Oliveiro wrote:
    >> In article <>,
    >> thing2 <> wrote:
    >>
    >>>Even using them in labour intensive applications to prevent back injury,
    >>>or getting people with back injuries back into work....

    >>
    >> Let me predict that, in keeping with the Law of Unintended Consequences,
    >> they would be likely to lead to _new_ kinds of injuries?
    >>
    >> I'm thinking the RSI kind. Since suits like these make it so easy to
    >> exert a great deal of strength, people will be more likely to do so over
    >> and over. Such repetition can lead to its own kinds of damage.

    >
    >RSi is usually a small repetative movement suffered by office workers.
    >While I guess this could cause that in Labourers I wouldnt think it
    >unlikely. It appears to have advantages, in reducing injuries plus wear
    >and tear labourers suffer from during their working life, especially
    >after 40.


    RSI often happens when a movement requiring greater strength is replaced
    by one requiring less. For instance, the move from mechanical
    typewriters to computer keyboards. Physical labourers don't tend to get
    RSI because they use their strength a lot. (They can get back injuries,
    but that's a separate matter...)

    But this kind of suit precisely allows you to do things that previously
    required physical labour, with much less effort. Hence my prediction
    that it could lead to RSI-type injuries.

    >It may also lead to people thinking they are invincible, which
    >could be very bad.


    It's well-known that people have both an upper and lower pain threshold.
    If something is too difficult, they'll find something easier to do
    instead. But conversely, if something is too easy, they'll find
    something else to add to it. If this suit makes exerting power too easy,
    it will encourage people to exert more power.
    Lawrence D'Oliveiro, Aug 1, 2005
    #8
  9. thingy

    Dave Taylor Guest

    Dave Taylor, Aug 1, 2005
    #9
  10. In article <Xns96A5D3A6540E5daveytaynospamplshot@203.97.37.6>,
    Dave Taylor <> wrote:

    >Lawrence D'Oliveiro <_zealand> wrote in news:ldo-
    >:
    >
    >> RSI often happens when a movement requiring greater strength is replaced
    >> by one requiring less.

    >
    >I don't think so.
    >RSI = Repettive Strain Injury.


    And yet the mere repetition of movements requiring greater strength does
    not cause RSI. For instance, people did not get RSI from heavy use of
    mechanical typewriters. Yet they do get it from computer keyboards.
    Lawrence D¹Oliveiro, Aug 1, 2005
    #10
  11. thingy

    shannon Guest

    Lawrence D¹Oliveiro wrote:
    > In article <Xns96A5D3A6540E5daveytaynospamplshot@203.97.37.6>,
    > Dave Taylor <> wrote:
    >
    >
    >>Lawrence D'Oliveiro <_zealand> wrote in news:ldo-
    >>:
    >>
    >>
    >>>RSI often happens when a movement requiring greater strength is replaced
    >>>by one requiring less.

    >>
    >>I don't think so.
    >>RSI = Repettive Strain Injury.

    >
    >
    > And yet the mere repetition of movements requiring greater strength does
    > not cause RSI. For instance, people did not get RSI from heavy use of
    > mechanical typewriters. Yet they do get it from computer keyboards.


    Manual typewriters break the repetition for carriage return and paper
    changing, and they are slower so their are less repetitions.
    shannon, Aug 1, 2005
    #11
  12. In article <42edf771$>, shannon <> wrote:

    >Lawrence D¹Oliveiro wrote:
    >> In article <Xns96A5D3A6540E5daveytaynospamplshot@203.97.37.6>,
    >> Dave Taylor <> wrote:
    >>
    >>
    >>>Lawrence D'Oliveiro <_zealand> wrote in news:ldo-
    >>>:
    >>>
    >>>
    >>>>RSI often happens when a movement requiring greater strength is replaced
    >>>>by one requiring less.
    >>>
    >>>I don't think so.
    >>>RSI = Repettive Strain Injury.

    >>
    >> And yet the mere repetition of movements requiring greater strength does
    >> not cause RSI. For instance, people did not get RSI from heavy use of
    >> mechanical typewriters. Yet they do get it from computer keyboards.

    >
    >Manual typewriters break the repetition for carriage return and paper
    >changing, and they are slower so their are less repetitions.


    That's one theory. But it doesn't account for changes in RSI patterns
    _after_ typewriters were rendered obsolete.

    For instance, I can remember when DEC introduced their VT220 terminals,
    where the keys on the keyboards were lighter and had shorter travel than
    on the preceding VT100 models. This meant you could type faster, but it
    was also suspected of increasing the incidence of RSI.
    Lawrence D¹Oliveiro, Aug 5, 2005
    #12
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