National Geographic Society

Discussion in 'Digital Photography' started by aniramca@gmail.com, Aug 6, 2007.

  1. Guest

    What brand is the camera of choice which are selected among most of
    the NGS' photographers?
    Did the NASA's Apollo mission on the moon use the Hasselblad brand?
    Was NASA recently shipped Nikon cameras for the ISS ?
    Does Kodak play a big role in the supplies of lenses for earth mapping
    satellites?
    Where did the lenses which were installed for the Hubble telescope
    come from? Were they German or Japanese lenses?
    Just curious.
    , Aug 6, 2007
    #1
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  2. Robert Coe Guest

    On Sun, 05 Aug 2007 17:25:10 -0700, wrote:
    : What brand is the camera of choice which are selected among most of
    : the NGS' photographers?
    : Did the NASA's Apollo mission on the moon use the Hasselblad brand?
    : Was NASA recently shipped Nikon cameras for the ISS ?
    : Does Kodak play a big role in the supplies of lenses for earth mapping
    : satellites?
    : Where did the lenses which were installed for the Hubble telescope
    : come from? Were they German or Japanese lenses?
    : Just curious.

    Sounds like a Google project to me. Why don't you research the questions there
    and let us know what you find?
    Robert Coe, Aug 6, 2007
    #2
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  3. Noons Guest

    On Aug 6, 10:25 am, wrote:

    > What brand is the camera of choice which are selected among most of
    > the NGS' photographers?


    the ones that take photos

    > Did the NASA's Apollo mission on the moon use the Hasselblad brand?


    and Nikon. This is promising:
    http://apollo.sese.asu.edu/

    > Was NASA recently shipped Nikon cameras for the ISS ?


    apparently, yes.

    > Does Kodak play a big role in the supplies of lenses for earth mapping
    > satellites?


    wouldn't have a clue, sorry.
    does Kodak still make lenses?

    > Where did the lenses which were installed for the Hubble telescope
    > come from? Were they German or Japanese lenses?


    Dunno. More than likely made in Japan.

    > Just curious.


    Me 2.
    Noons, Aug 6, 2007
    #3
  4. Gordon Freeman, Aug 6, 2007
    #4
  5. Stan Beck Guest

    NGS photographers own their own gear, and some like Nikon, others like
    Canon. Generally, Canon has a greater share of the market. However, there
    are situations that call of larger format. Depends upon the subject and the
    photographer.

    Won't even try to answer the other questions.

    --
    In the US everything is made in China except Chinese food - it's made in the
    US.

    Stan Beck > From New Orleans to Brandon MS
    To reply, remove 101 from address.
    ***

    <> wrote in message
    news:...
    > What brand is the camera of choice which are selected among most of
    > the NGS' photographers?
    > Did the NASA's Apollo mission on the moon use the Hasselblad brand?
    > Was NASA recently shipped Nikon cameras for the ISS ?
    > Does Kodak play a big role in the supplies of lenses for earth mapping
    > satellites?
    > Where did the lenses which were installed for the Hubble telescope
    > come from? Were they German or Japanese lenses?
    > Just curious.
    >
    Stan Beck, Aug 6, 2007
    #5
  6. JohnR66 Guest

    <> wrote in message
    news:...
    > What brand is the camera of choice which are selected among most of
    > the NGS' photographers?
    > Did the NASA's Apollo mission on the moon use the Hasselblad brand?
    > Was NASA recently shipped Nikon cameras for the ISS ?
    > Does Kodak play a big role in the supplies of lenses for earth mapping
    > satellites?
    > Where did the lenses which were installed for the Hubble telescope
    > come from? Were they German or Japanese lenses?
    > Just curious.
    >

    As far as NGS, I believe it is the photographer's choice of his own
    equipment. Some still choose to use film.

    I wonder if NGS allowed lower res cameras early on, in the 3-5mp range like
    the Canon D30 and some early Nikons.
    John
    JohnR66, Aug 6, 2007
    #6
  7. Fat Sam Guest

    wrote:
    > What brand is the camera of choice which are selected among most of
    > the NGS' photographers?
    > Did the NASA's Apollo mission on the moon use the Hasselblad brand?
    > Was NASA recently shipped Nikon cameras for the ISS ?
    > Does Kodak play a big role in the supplies of lenses for earth mapping
    > satellites?
    > Where did the lenses which were installed for the Hubble telescope
    > come from? Were they German or Japanese lenses?
    > Just curious.


    I know that the UK military uses mostly Zeiss lenses for its aeriel
    recconnaissance and survey imagery, although they also use Vinten equipment
    too.
    Seriously large format stuff producing 9x9 inch negatives.
    Fat Sam, Aug 6, 2007
    #7
  8. Noons Guest

    On Aug 6, 9:53 pm, Gordon Freeman <> wrote:

    >
    > >> Did the NASA's Apollo mission on the moon use the Hasselblad brand?

    >
    > > and Nikon. This is promising:
    > >http://apollo.sese.asu.edu/

    >
    > Interesting resource. You can even see the studio lights in some of the
    > Hasselblad shots of the lunar surface.
    >
    > In this one, the back wall of the studio is visible:http://www.lpi.usra.edu/resources/apollo/frame/?AS12-46-6868


    is that from the same source? I don't think so.
    Noons, Aug 6, 2007
    #8
  9. frederick Guest

    JohnR66 wrote:
    > <> wrote in message
    > news:...
    >> What brand is the camera of choice which are selected among most of
    >> the NGS' photographers?
    >> Did the NASA's Apollo mission on the moon use the Hasselblad brand?
    >> Was NASA recently shipped Nikon cameras for the ISS ?
    >> Does Kodak play a big role in the supplies of lenses for earth mapping
    >> satellites?
    >> Where did the lenses which were installed for the Hubble telescope
    >> come from? Were they German or Japanese lenses?
    >> Just curious.
    >>

    > As far as NGS, I believe it is the photographer's choice of his own
    > equipment. Some still choose to use film.
    >
    > I wonder if NGS allowed lower res cameras early on, in the 3-5mp range like
    > the Canon D30 and some early Nikons.
    > John
    >

    IIRC the first "all digital" article published by NG was shot using a
    Nikon D1x and D100 (5.5 and 6mp) cameras. It was an article on war
    planes, I think photographed by Joe McNally:
    http://magma.nationalgeographic.com/ngm/0312/feature1/index.html
    If you search the NG website, you can easily find links like this:
    http://www7.nationalgeographic.com/ngm/0601/feature5/gallery1.html
    Which may dispel some of the myth around equipment that pros use, and
    about use of digital cameras in publications.
    frederick, Aug 6, 2007
    #9
  10. Noons <> wrote:

    > On Aug 6, 9:53 pm, Gordon Freeman <> wrote:
    >
    >>
    >> >> Did the NASA's Apollo mission on the moon use the Hasselblad brand?

    >>
    >> > and Nikon. This is promising: http://apollo.sese.asu.edu/

    >>
    >> Interesting resource. You can even see the studio lights in some of the
    >> Hasselblad shots of the lunar surface.
    >>
    >> In this one, the back wall of the studio is

    visible:http://www.lpi.usra.edu/resources/apollo/frame/?AS12-46-6868
    >
    > is that from the same source? I don't think so.
    >


    the original link leads to it if you click on "Space Exploration Resources"
    then Earth's Moon and then the Apollo Hasselblad link. Those were the only
    actual Hasselblad images I could find.
    Gordon Freeman, Aug 7, 2007
    #10
  11. Rich Guest

    On Aug 6, 7:53 am, Gordon Freeman <> wrote:
    > Noons <> wrote:
    > > On Aug 6, 10:25 am, wrote:

    >
    > >> Did the NASA's Apollo mission on the moon use the Hasselblad brand?

    >
    > > and Nikon. This is promising:
    > >http://apollo.sese.asu.edu/

    >
    > Interesting resource. You can even see the studio lights in some of the
    > Hasselblad shots of the lunar surface.
    >
    > In this one, the back wall of the studio is visible:http://www.lpi.usra.edu/resources/apollo/frame/?AS12-46-6868


    F----- kook.
    Rich, Aug 7, 2007
    #11
  12. Dave Cohen Guest

    Fat Sam wrote:
    > wrote:
    >> What brand is the camera of choice which are selected among most of
    >> the NGS' photographers?
    >> Did the NASA's Apollo mission on the moon use the Hasselblad brand?
    >> Was NASA recently shipped Nikon cameras for the ISS ?
    >> Does Kodak play a big role in the supplies of lenses for earth mapping
    >> satellites?
    >> Where did the lenses which were installed for the Hubble telescope
    >> come from? Were they German or Japanese lenses?
    >> Just curious.

    >
    > I know that the UK military uses mostly Zeiss lenses for its aeriel
    > recconnaissance and survey imagery, although they also use Vinten equipment
    > too.
    > Seriously large format stuff producing 9x9 inch negatives.
    >
    >

    That lens in the hubble won't look much like the one in your camera
    although I suppose you could design a camera to use a mirror!!
    Dave Cohen
    Dave Cohen, Aug 7, 2007
    #12
  13. gn_user Guest

    On Sun, 05 Aug 2007 17:25:10 -0700,
    wrote:<>

    snip
    >Just curious.


    www.google.com
    gn_user, Aug 7, 2007
    #13
  14. Guest

    On Aug 6, 8:20 pm, Dave Cohen <> wrote:
    > Fat Sam wrote:
    > > wrote:
    > >> What brand is the camera of choice which are selected among most of
    > >> the NGS' photographers?
    > >> Did the NASA's Apollo mission on the moon use the Hasselblad brand?
    > >> Was NASA recently shipped Nikon cameras for the ISS ?
    > >> Does Kodak play a big role in the supplies of lenses for earth mapping
    > >> satellites?
    > >> Where did the lenses which were installed for the Hubble telescope
    > >> come from? Were they German or Japanese lenses?
    > >> Just curious.

    >
    > > I know that the UK military uses mostly Zeiss lenses for its aeriel
    > > recconnaissance and survey imagery, although they also use Vinten equipment
    > > too.
    > > Seriously large format stuff producing 9x9 inch negatives.

    >
    > That lens in the hubble won't look much like the one in your camera
    > although I suppose you could design a camera to use a mirror!!
    > Dave Cohen


    The reason I threw this question is because I recall that Canon used
    to advertise in the NG magazine, and the ad's content is usually about
    a NGS photographer using Canon camera and equipment. Correct me if I
    am wrong, as I just recall this by memory, and the ads were shown in
    the magazine far prior to digital camera era (1970s or 80s). I have
    not been read or taken noticed on NG magazines in teh past few years,
    and don't know if Canon still advertises their cameras there.
    , Aug 7, 2007
    #14
  15. Allen Guest

    Dave Cohen wrote:
    <snip>
    >>

    > That lens in the hubble won't look much like the one in your camera
    > although I suppose you could design a camera to use a mirror!!
    > Dave Cohen


    As a matter of fact, back in the 1960s (might have extended into the
    1970s), 500 mm focal length mirror lenses were being marketed by, among
    others, Spiratone. There may have been 1000 mm ones also, but I don't
    recall. In the ads they looked like black Quaker Oats boxes with a
    protuberance for mounting and also a tripod socket. I have no idea how
    many were sold, but I must admit that I lusted after one. I don't recall
    that I ever actually ordered anything from Spiratone, but I miss their
    ads, usually four pages in Pop Photo and Modern Photo, containing all
    sorts of camera accessories--extension tubes, filters, T-mounts and
    lenses, all kinds of gadgets.
    Allen
    Allen, Aug 7, 2007
    #15
  16. Guest Guest

    The Hubble uses mirror optics.
    Old Bob
    Guest, Aug 7, 2007
    #16
  17. Martin Brown Guest

    On Aug 6, 10:10 am, Noons <> wrote:
    > On Aug 6, 10:25 am, wrote:
    >
    > > Where did the lenses which were installed for the Hubble telescope
    > > come from? Were they German or Japanese lenses?


    Perkin Elmer made the systematically myopic main mirror for Hubble at
    Danbury, Conn. Kodak made the unused backup mirror correctly (which
    didn't fly). The latter was later used in ground based system tests to
    help diagnose the problem with the Hubble after it was placed in
    orbit.
    >
    > Dunno. More than likely made in Japan.


    You do down fine US instrument makers unjustly with that throw away
    line.

    Regards,
    Martin Brown
    Martin Brown, Aug 7, 2007
    #17
  18. Allen <> wrote:
    >Dave Cohen wrote:
    ><snip>
    >>>

    >> That lens in the hubble won't look much like the one
    >> in your camera although I suppose you could design a
    >> camera to use a mirror!!
    >> Dave Cohen

    >
    >As a matter of fact, back in the 1960s (might have
    >extended into the 1970s), 500 mm focal length mirror
    >lenses were being marketed by, among others,
    >Spiratone. There may have been 1000 mm ones also, but I


    There has for quite a few decades been a proliferation
    of mirror lenses for 35mm SLR cameras. Some have been
    relatively good (Nikon and Vivitar come to mind as both
    having sold high quality catadioptric lenses at one
    time). There have been everything from 250mm to 1400mm
    models, but f/8 500mm models are the ubiquitous.

    Today most of them are rather inexpensive (costing less
    than $130 new), and not of particularly high quality in any
    way. (They are almost all made by the same manufacturer
    in Korea.)

    --
    Floyd L. Davidson <http://www.apaflo.com/floyd_davidson>
    Ukpeagvik (Barrow, Alaska)
    Floyd L. Davidson, Aug 7, 2007
    #18
  19. Allen Guest

    Floyd L. Davidson wrote:
    > Allen <> wrote:
    >> Dave Cohen wrote:
    >> <snip>
    >>> That lens in the hubble won't look much like the one
    >>> in your camera although I suppose you could design a
    >>> camera to use a mirror!!
    >>> Dave Cohen

    >> As a matter of fact, back in the 1960s (might have
    >> extended into the 1970s), 500 mm focal length mirror
    >> lenses were being marketed by, among others,
    >> Spiratone. There may have been 1000 mm ones also, but I

    >
    > There has for quite a few decades been a proliferation
    > of mirror lenses for 35mm SLR cameras. Some have been
    > relatively good (Nikon and Vivitar come to mind as both
    > having sold high quality catadioptric lenses at one
    > time). There have been everything from 250mm to 1400mm
    > models, but f/8 500mm models are the ubiquitous.
    >
    > Today most of them are rather inexpensive (costing less
    > than $130 new), and not of particularly high quality in any
    > way. (They are almost all made by the same manufacturer
    > in Korea.)
    >

    Thanks for broadening my knowledge of the mirror-lens subject. As I
    recall, those first ones were always "wide open", so to speak, and
    shutter speed was the only way to control exposure. Did any of the later
    ones solve that problem? Also, f/8 was pretty small for action pictures
    of animals in motion, especially birds, without going to high-speed
    film. Because of the limitations of both the lenses and my bank account,
    I never really seriously investigated them.
    Allen
    Allen, Aug 7, 2007
    #19
  20. John Turco Guest

    wrote:
    >
    > What brand is the camera of choice which are selected among most of
    > the NGS' photographers?
    > Did the NASA's Apollo mission on the moon use the Hasselblad brand?
    > Was NASA recently shipped Nikon cameras for the ISS ?
    > Does Kodak play a big role in the supplies of lenses for earth mapping
    > satellites?
    > Where did the lenses which were installed for the Hubble telescope
    > come from? Were they German or Japanese lenses?
    > Just curious.



    Hello, Aniramca:

    Kodak <http://www.kodak.com> long been a leading supplier of NASA's
    photographic and optical technology.

    Fast Facts About Kodak Science and Technology
    <http://www.kodak.com/US/en/corp/researchDevelopment/facts.jhtml>

    Some selected, space-related quotes, from the above Web page:

    "For the Apollo 11 mission, Kodak built the electronic camera that sent
    still pictures back from the moon in 1969."

    "In the 1997 Mars Surface Rover mission, Kodak image sensors captured
    close-up images of Mars."

    "Kodak designed the optics for the Chandra X-ray space telescope in
    1999."


    Cordially,
    John Turco <>
    John Turco, Aug 8, 2007
    #20
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