MSI files

Discussion in 'MCSE' started by David K, Dec 12, 2003.

  1. David K

    David K Guest

    In Sybex's 70-218 W2k Network Management book, on page 467, #6:

    There's a question I can't reason out for sure. First, the question
    and answer:

    "6. Charles is the network administrator for the Worldwide Apparel
    Company. He is responsible for all the accounts in single-domain
    Windows 2000 network that has two sites; one in Los Angeles and one in
    New York. He has been told that a new application must be distributed
    to the designers in each location. It is a Windows 2000 compliant
    program that has been tested in the lab by the support engineers. He
    has already created a Designer OU that contains the workstations that
    need the application. Charlesl packages the application as an MSI
    file. He then defines the package in a GPO and links it to the
    Designer OU. The next day, the gets calls from the users that the
    promised application is not in their Start menus. What does Charles
    most likely need to do to deploy the network application to the
    specified computers?

    A. Make a Windows Installer shortcut for the application
    B. Repackage the application as an MSI file and redploy the
    application
    C. Apply a transformation file to the installed application on the
    Designer OU computers.
    D. Re-creat the ZAP file and then deploy it to the Designer OU."

    Answer given:
    "6. B. ZAP files cannot be assigned, they must be published, and since
    the application is Windows 2000 compliant there's no reason not to use
    an MSI file. ZAP files are created when there is no MSI file available
    or one cannot be created. These are usually applications that are not
    Windows 2000 compliant. Transoformation files are used to customize a
    package file to determine which features will be available in the
    application."

    My confusion:

    But it was already packaged as an MSI file to begin with. Is this
    implying that the MSI file was packaged improperly the first time? If
    so, shouldn't it suggest this, instead of just saying to do it again?
    It makes me doubt whether the possible answers are all worded
    correctly, or whether the correct answer given has the wrong
    description. None of the other answers seem right to me, so I'm
    guessing that B is indeed the correct answer, but it isn't clear to
    me. Can someone explain this?

    I've looked into MSI file creation via 3rd party utilities and have
    learned that it's a very sensitive process, so I could see how a
    package could be made improperly. But the book doesn't make this
    clear.

    Dave
     
    David K, Dec 12, 2003
    #1
    1. Advertising

  2. David K

    Glenn Guest

    I think the question had a typo. It probably wasn't supposed to say package
    the file as an MSI file.
    MSI file deployment become more interesting with 2003 and Longhorn, btw.
    Glenn
    "David K" <> wrote in message
    news:...
    > In Sybex's 70-218 W2k Network Management book, on page 467, #6:
    >
    > There's a question I can't reason out for sure. First, the question
    > and answer:
    >
    > "6. Charles is the network administrator for the Worldwide Apparel
    > Company. He is responsible for all the accounts in single-domain
    > Windows 2000 network that has two sites; one in Los Angeles and one in
    > New York. He has been told that a new application must be distributed
    > to the designers in each location. It is a Windows 2000 compliant
    > program that has been tested in the lab by the support engineers. He
    > has already created a Designer OU that contains the workstations that
    > need the application. Charlesl packages the application as an MSI
    > file. He then defines the package in a GPO and links it to the
    > Designer OU. The next day, the gets calls from the users that the
    > promised application is not in their Start menus. What does Charles
    > most likely need to do to deploy the network application to the
    > specified computers?
    >
    > A. Make a Windows Installer shortcut for the application
    > B. Repackage the application as an MSI file and redploy the
    > application
    > C. Apply a transformation file to the installed application on the
    > Designer OU computers.
    > D. Re-creat the ZAP file and then deploy it to the Designer OU."
    >
    > Answer given:
    > "6. B. ZAP files cannot be assigned, they must be published, and since
    > the application is Windows 2000 compliant there's no reason not to use
    > an MSI file. ZAP files are created when there is no MSI file available
    > or one cannot be created. These are usually applications that are not
    > Windows 2000 compliant. Transoformation files are used to customize a
    > package file to determine which features will be available in the
    > application."
    >
    > My confusion:
    >
    > But it was already packaged as an MSI file to begin with. Is this
    > implying that the MSI file was packaged improperly the first time? If
    > so, shouldn't it suggest this, instead of just saying to do it again?
    > It makes me doubt whether the possible answers are all worded
    > correctly, or whether the correct answer given has the wrong
    > description. None of the other answers seem right to me, so I'm
    > guessing that B is indeed the correct answer, but it isn't clear to
    > me. Can someone explain this?
    >
    > I've looked into MSI file creation via 3rd party utilities and have
    > learned that it's a very sensitive process, so I could see how a
    > package could be made improperly. But the book doesn't make this
    > clear.
    >
    > Dave
     
    Glenn, Dec 12, 2003
    #2
    1. Advertising

  3. David K

    KennyG Guest

    A little late, i know, but i have the answer, i think.

    This is why everyone that "knows" hates multiple choice questions. This is
    a "trick" question in the sense that none of the answers are ideal. The
    "trick" is that you are asked to chose the "best" answer from the list.
    This is something you must get used to when taking multiple choice tests.

    The answer is "B" because the other answers are wrong and so the only
    logical thing to do is pick "B". If you had this happen for real on the
    job, you would review what you did and maybe reason that everything was done
    right so it should have worked, but it did not work, so you do it again.
    Repackage. The original must have been bad. that is the only alternative
    given the other answers.

    Aren't multiple choice questions fun?
     
    KennyG, Dec 17, 2003
    #3
    1. Advertising

Want to reply to this thread or ask your own question?

It takes just 2 minutes to sign up (and it's free!). Just click the sign up button to choose a username and then you can ask your own questions on the forum.
Similar Threads
  1. Silverstrand

    MSI K8N Neo3-F Motherboard Review

    Silverstrand, Jun 21, 2005, in forum: Front Page News
    Replies:
    0
    Views:
    2,052
    Silverstrand
    Jun 21, 2005
  2. Slack
    Replies:
    7
    Views:
    26,334
    Graham P. Filders
    Mar 27, 2005
  3. JeffS

    Help! Files, Files, and more Files ... Everywhere

    JeffS, Sep 16, 2004, in forum: Digital Photography
    Replies:
    22
    Views:
    663
  4. mic

    MSI files wont open

    mic, Nov 3, 2006, in forum: Computer Support
    Replies:
    4
    Views:
    1,104
  5. Tick Tock

    Why did MS Stuff up with MSI Files..?

    Tick Tock, Mar 6, 2004, in forum: NZ Computing
    Replies:
    4
    Views:
    304
    Ray Colvill
    Mar 7, 2004
Loading...

Share This Page