MS WORD launches slowly due to IE local security setting

Discussion in 'Computer Security' started by Zak, Nov 2, 2006.

  1. Zak

    Zak Guest

    When I launch MICROSOFT WORD I see from Reg Mon (by System Internals)
    that WOERD will not launch quickly because it is spending tens of
    seconds looping through the registry checking the following key and its
    associated subkeys:

    HKEY_CURRENT_USER\Software\Microsoft\Windows\CurrentVersion\Internet
    Settings\Zones

    There is an article by Miscosoft called:
    "How to strengthen the security settings for the Local Machine zone in
    Internet Explorer"
    <http://support.microsoft.com/kb/833633>.

    This article suggests that the reg key I give above is for local user
    security settings.

    Does this mean I can delete this reg key and let security defualt to the
    machine settings?

    I am hoping that WORD will then not get stuck on the looping that I see.
    Zak, Nov 2, 2006
    #1
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  2. Zak

    erewhon Guest

    "Zak" <> wrote in message
    news:Xns986F8F28F454C64A18E@127.0.0.1...
    > When I launch MICROSOFT WORD I see from Reg Mon (by System Internals)
    > that WOERD will not launch quickly because it is spending tens of
    > seconds looping through the registry checking the following key and its
    > associated subkeys:
    >
    > HKEY_CURRENT_USER\Software\Microsoft\Windows\CurrentVersion\Internet
    > Settings\Zones


    Perhaps this is malware?

    http://forums.spywareinfo.com/lofiversion/index.php/t17092.html
    erewhon, Nov 2, 2006
    #2
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  3. Zak wrote:

    > Does this mean I can delete this reg key and let security defualt to the
    > machine settings?


    No. It means that you should abandon MSIE or MS Word, at best both.

    > I am hoping that WORD will then not get stuck on the looping that I see.


    WORD will get stuck for whatever reason it wants to see.
    Sebastian Gottschalk, Nov 2, 2006
    #3
  4. In article <>, says...
    > Zak wrote:
    >
    > > Does this mean I can delete this reg key and let security defualt to the
    > > machine settings?

    >
    > No. It means that you should abandon MSIE or MS Word, at best both.
    >
    > > I am hoping that WORD will then not get stuck on the looping that I see.

    >
    > WORD will get stuck for whatever reason it wants to see.
    >



    http://www.mozilla.org/projects/seamonkey/


    http://www.openoffice.org/

    The daily double contains no fatty Microsoft content to clog the
    arteries of your computer. ;)


    --
    James E. Morrow
    Email to:
    James E. Morrow, Nov 2, 2006
    #4
  5. Zak

    Todd H. Guest

    James E. Morrow <> writes:

    > In article <>, says...
    > > Zak wrote:
    > >
    > > > Does this mean I can delete this reg key and let security defualt to the
    > > > machine settings?

    > >
    > > No. It means that you should abandon MSIE or MS Word, at best both.
    > >
    > > > I am hoping that WORD will then not get stuck on the looping that I see.

    > >
    > > WORD will get stuck for whatever reason it wants to see.
    > >

    >
    >
    > http://www.mozilla.org/projects/seamonkey/
    >
    >
    > http://www.openoffice.org/
    >
    > The daily double contains no fatty Microsoft content to clog the
    > arteries of your computer. ;)


    Caveat: OpenOffice will load and run slower than the equivalent MS applications. :)

    But it is free nad it is free of Microsoftness, which is reason enough
    to use it. But blazing performance isn't among the reasons, just to
    keep it real. :)


    --
    Todd H.
    http://www.toddh.net/
    Todd H., Nov 2, 2006
    #5
  6. Todd H. wrote:

    > Caveat: OpenOffice will load and run slower than the equivalent MS applications. :)


    Give me a hint. I click on the SOffice-Icon in the task bar, select "New
    text document", and it's there in a blink. MS Office takes 5 seconds, and
    when removing its preloader it will take 10+ seconds.

    > But it is free nad it is free of Microsoftness, which is reason enough
    > to use it. But blazing performance isn't among the reasons, just to
    > keep it real. :)


    Again, give me a hint. I open a 30000+ rows table with OpenOffice, search
    for a string, and get a list of all results after one or two seconds.
    However, I never found out how long MS Excel takes for the same task, I
    always killed it after one hour of CPU-hogging white-window inactivity.

    Anyway, MS Office doesn't support any usable document storage format.
    Sebastian Gottschalk, Nov 2, 2006
    #6
  7. Zak

    Todd H. Guest

    Sebastian Gottschalk <> writes:

    > Todd H. wrote:
    >
    > > Caveat: OpenOffice will load and run slower than the equivalent MS applications. :)

    >
    > Give me a hint. I click on the SOffice-Icon in the task bar,



    If you care to accept the overhead of preloading all that running the
    launcher, sure. But that's sorta cheating.

    I don't really have time zealots that can't see the limitations of
    their own favorite tools. And don't forget, I actually like Open
    Office, but don't pretend it's superior to Microsoft Office in every
    way, that's all.

    --
    Todd H.
    http://www.toddh.net/
    Todd H., Nov 2, 2006
    #7
  8. Zak

    Todd H. Guest

    (Todd H.) writes:

    > Sebastian Gottschalk <> writes:
    >
    > > Todd H. wrote:
    > >
    > > > Caveat: OpenOffice will load and run slower than the equivalent MS applications. :)

    > >
    > > Give me a hint. I click on the SOffice-Icon in the task bar,

    >
    >
    > If you care to accept the overhead of preloading all that running the
    > launcher, sure. But that's sorta cheating.


    Heh. Okay, my curiosity is piqued and I have taken a few minutes to
    quantify my assertion that Open Office, great as it is, is slow in
    comparison to MS Office.

    P3 Thinkpad T23, 1.1Ghz with a gig of RAM, running win2k natively.

    Just tried it with Word 2002 sp3 (Office XP)- click
    start>programs>Microsoft Word and I can start typing in my new
    document in 3 seconds. Word hadn't been opened on the machine since
    the last reboot, office toolbar is not run during statup on my system.

    Now, allowing Open Office 1.1.5's starter to run in the taskbar, rmb>
    text document still takes 4x as long-- 12 seconds for open office
    1.1.5 to open.

    Open Office Writer 2.0.3 took 22 seconds from icon click to being able
    to type anything on the same machine (without the benefit of the
    starter running).

    The only good news is that restarts were fast for Open Office after
    closing writer, and then restarting it from the task bar icon. With
    the benfits of everything fresh in cache, they still only barely edge
    Word's start time from a dead stop.

    So, for all of us who trumpet Open Office (and I'm among you), you do
    need to cross "better load time performance" off the list of virtues
    you can sell it with with a straight face.

    Best Regards,
    --
    Todd H.
    http://www.toddh.net/
    Todd H., Nov 2, 2006
    #8
  9. Zak

    MC Guest

    Zak wrote:
    > When I launch MICROSOFT WORD I see from Reg Mon (by System Internals)
    > that WOERD will not launch quickly because it is spending tens of
    > seconds looping through the registry checking the following key and its
    > associated subkeys:
    >
    > HKEY_CURRENT_USER\Software\Microsoft\Windows\CurrentVersion\Internet
    > Settings\Zones

    [rest snipped]

    Word has no business looking at Internet settings -- it is supposed to
    be a word processor. I guess this is the typical thing you will see
    though with MS products always getting linked one way or another to MSIE
    even if it's absolutely unneeded and unwanted.

    I suggest you take a look at another word processor that doesn't try to
    use an internet browser back-end (for whatever reason). A good
    alternative is OpenOffice; it's free and can read/write MS word files if
    needed.
    I also suggest strongly that you get a firewall installed, and in it,
    block MSIE from accessing the Internet (and through it, programs that
    use it as a backdoor out to bypass firewalls), and install a different
    browser for your surfing needs. I have done this a long time ago myself
    without any negative side effects.


    MC
    MC, Nov 3, 2006
    #9
  10. Todd H. wrote:

    > (Todd H.) writes:
    >
    >> Sebastian Gottschalk <> writes:
    >>
    >>> Todd H. wrote:
    >>>
    >>> > Caveat: OpenOffice will load and run slower than the equivalent MS applications. :)
    >>>
    >>> Give me a hint. I click on the SOffice-Icon in the task bar,

    >>
    >> If you care to accept the overhead of preloading all that running the
    >> launcher, sure. But that's sorta cheating.


    It isn't. MS Office uses a lot more preloading.

    > Heh. Okay, my curiosity is piqued and I have taken a few minutes to
    > quantify my assertion that Open Office, great as it is, is slow in
    > comparison to MS Office.
    >
    > P3 Thinkpad T23, 1.1Ghz with a gig of RAM, running win2k natively.
    >
    > Just tried it with Word 2002 sp3 (Office XP)- click
    > start>programs>Microsoft Word and I can start typing in my new
    > document in 3 seconds. Word hadn't been opened on the machine since
    > the last reboot, office toolbar is not run during statup on my system.


    What about IE's preloader? It contributes a lot.

    > Now, allowing Open Office 1.1.5's starter to run in the taskbar, rmb>
    > text document still takes 4x as long-- 12 seconds for open office
    > 1.1.5 to open.
    >
    > Open Office Writer 2.0.3 took 22 seconds from icon click to being able
    > to type anything on the same machine (without the benefit of the
    > starter running).


    As I already wrote: I achieve quite contradicting results.
    Sebastian Gottschalk, Nov 3, 2006
    #10
  11. MC wrote:

    > I also suggest strongly that you get a firewall installed, and in it,
    > block MSIE from accessing the Internet


    Firewalls can't filter by applications.

    > (and through it, programs that use it as a backdoor out to bypass firewalls)


    Thanks for cluttering my list of most stupid ideas.

    > and install a different browser for your surfing needs.


    Huh? You always need a webbrowser to surf, and as Windows doesn't include
    any, you always have to install one.
    Sebastian Gottschalk, Nov 3, 2006
    #11
  12. Zak

    Leythos Guest

    In article <>, says...
    > Huh? You always need a webbrowser to surf, and as Windows doesn't include
    > any, you always have to install one.


    Windows includes IE by default, it's already installed.

    --


    remove 999 in order to email me
    Leythos, Nov 3, 2006
    #12
  13. Sebastian Gottschalk wrote:

    > MC wrote:
    >
    >> I also suggest strongly that you get a firewall installed, and in it,
    >> block MSIE from accessing the Internet

    >
    > Firewalls can't filter by applications.


    Huh? My Windows personal software firewall asks me every time I start
    Internet Explorer whether or not I want to give it access to the web.
    It's Kerio, if you need to know. (IE is not my default browser, and I
    only use it to test web pages.)

    >> (and through it, programs that use it as a backdoor out to bypass
    >> firewalls)

    >
    > Thanks for cluttering my list of most stupid ideas.
    >
    >> and install a different browser for your surfing needs.

    >
    > Huh? You always need a webbrowser to surf, and as Windows doesn't
    > include any, you always have to install one.


    Every Windows version since .. um .. W98? has had IE embedded in it.
    Where are you buying *your* Windows?

    --
    -bts
    -Motorcycles defy gravity; cars just suck
    Beauregard T. Shagnasty, Nov 3, 2006
    #13
  14. Beauregard T. Shagnasty wrote:

    > Sebastian Gottschalk wrote:
    >
    >> MC wrote:
    >>
    >>> I also suggest strongly that you get a firewall installed, and in it,
    >>> block MSIE from accessing the Internet

    >>
    >> Firewalls can't filter by applications.

    >
    > Huh? My Windows personal software firewall asks me every time I start
    > Internet Explorer whether or not I want to give it access to the web.
    > It's Kerio, if you need to know. (IE is not my default browser, and I
    > only use it to test web pages.)


    That's not a firewall, that's a host-based packet filter. And a pretty
    lousy one. And the application control is, of course, useless against
    malicious software. You're just wasting your time with explicitly allowing
    stuff that is legitimate anyway.

    >> Huh? You always need a webbrowser to surf, and as Windows doesn't
    >> include any, you always have to install one.

    >
    > Every Windows version since .. um .. W98? has had IE embedded in it.
    > Where are you buying *your* Windows?


    IE is no webbrowser. Read the documentation!
    Sebastian Gottschalk, Nov 3, 2006
    #14
  15. Sebastian Gottschalk wrote:

    > Beauregard T. Shagnasty wrote:
    >
    >> Sebastian Gottschalk wrote:
    >>
    >>> MC wrote:
    >>>
    >>>> I also suggest strongly that you get a firewall installed, and in it,
    >>>> block MSIE from accessing the Internet
    >>>
    >>> Firewalls can't filter by applications.

    >>
    >> Huh? My Windows personal software firewall asks me every time I start
    >> Internet Explorer whether or not I want to give it access to the web.
    >> It's Kerio, if you need to know. (IE is not my default browser, and I
    >> only use it to test web pages.)

    >
    > That's not a firewall, that's a host-based packet filter. And a pretty
    > lousy one.


    I don't worry about that; there is a router in front of it. However, it
    does do the job I require of it.

    > And the application control is, of course, useless against
    > malicious software.


    Yeah, I know all the stories.

    > You're just wasting your time with explicitly allowing
    > stuff that is legitimate anyway.


    ...and when said legitimate stuff can be fired off by illegitimate stuff?

    >>> Huh? You always need a webbrowser to surf, and as Windows doesn't
    >>> include any, you always have to install one.

    >>
    >> Every Windows version since .. um .. W98? has had IE embedded in it.
    >> Where are you buying *your* Windows?

    >
    > IE is no webbrowser. Read the documentation!


    Ok, it's an operating system component. There is no point in arguing
    semantics.

    --
    -bts
    -Motorcycles defy gravity; cars just suck
    Beauregard T. Shagnasty, Nov 3, 2006
    #15
  16. Beauregard T. Shagnasty wrote:

    > Sebastian Gottschalk wrote:
    >
    >> Beauregard T. Shagnasty wrote:
    >>
    >>> Sebastian Gottschalk wrote:
    >>>
    >>>> MC wrote:
    >>>>
    >>>>> I also suggest strongly that you get a firewall installed, and in it,
    >>>>> block MSIE from accessing the Internet
    >>>>
    >>>> Firewalls can't filter by applications.
    >>>
    >>> Huh? My Windows personal software firewall asks me every time I start
    >>> Internet Explorer whether or not I want to give it access to the web.
    >>> It's Kerio, if you need to know. (IE is not my default browser, and I
    >>> only use it to test web pages.)

    >>
    >> That's not a firewall, that's a host-based packet filter. And a pretty
    >> lousy one.

    >
    > I don't worry about that; there is a router in front of it.


    A router isn't a firewall either.

    > However, it does do the job I require of it.


    I doubt that it achieves the impossible.

    >> You're just wasting your time with explicitly allowing
    >> stuff that is legitimate anyway.

    >
    > ..and when said legitimate stuff can be fired off by illegitimate stuff?


    Who'd be that stupid?

    >> IE is no webbrowser. Read the documentation!

    >
    > Ok, it's an operating system component. There is no point in arguing
    > semantics.


    Well, you did that. After all, MSIE lacks various necessary properties for
    a webbrowser, f.e. security or proper HTML rendering.
    Sebastian Gottschalk, Nov 3, 2006
    #16
  17. Zak

    Peter Davis Guest

    On 03 Nov 2006, Sebastian Gottschalk <> wrote:

    > MC wrote:
    >
    >> I also suggest strongly that you get a firewall installed, and in
    >> it, block MSIE from accessing the Internet

    >
    > Firewalls can't filter by applications.



    Does Sygate qualify?

    You can specify applications in Sygate.
    Peter Davis, Nov 3, 2006
    #17
  18. Peter Davis wrote:

    > On 03 Nov 2006, Sebastian Gottschalk <> wrote:
    >
    >> MC wrote:
    >>
    >>> I also suggest strongly that you get a firewall installed, and in
    >>> it, block MSIE from accessing the Internet

    >>
    >> Firewalls can't filter by applications.

    >
    > Does Sygate qualify?


    No.

    > You can specify applications in Sygate.


    So what? Doesn't have any usage, beside impressing the user about claimed
    functionality.
    Sebastian Gottschalk, Nov 3, 2006
    #18
  19. Zak

    MC Guest

    Sebastian Gottschalk wrote:
    >> I also suggest strongly that you get a firewall installed, and in it,
    >> block MSIE from accessing the Internet

    > Firewalls can't filter by applications.


    Well, sorry, but they can, and have been able to for quite a number of
    years. If you have one that can't I suggest you look for a different
    (software) firewall.

    >> (and through it, programs that use it as a backdoor out to bypass firewalls)

    > Thanks for cluttering my list of most stupid ideas.

    May I remind you that this is an open newsgroup and not "your" list?
    Thank you.

    >> and install a different browser for your surfing needs.

    > Huh? You always need a webbrowser to surf, and as Windows doesn't include
    > any, you always have to install one.

    Windows has included a browser as part of their installation for a very,
    very long time. Usually called "iexplore". Try it :p

    MC
    MC, Nov 3, 2006
    #19
  20. Zak

    MC Guest

    Sebastian Gottschalk wrote:
    >>> You're just wasting your time with explicitly allowing
    >>> stuff that is legitimate anyway.

    >> ..and when said legitimate stuff can be fired off by illegitimate stuff?

    > Who'd be that stupid?


    I beg to differ. What is easier than for a malicious piece of software
    than to launch a hidden Internet Explorer window or use the HTTP
    back-end to download and install whatever it wants from anywhere? Even
    someone that knows little about programming can do that easily with a
    few commands.
    It's something that is done a -lot- to bypass semi-secure systems, it's
    not stupid, it's smart. Most people allow MSIE to indiscriminantly
    connect to the Internet, even the ones with a firewall (packet filter,
    whatever you call it) and since it's a part of any standard Windows
    installation, it's something that will always be there and available to use.

    And a firewall as you define it wouldn't stop any program from directly
    accessing the Internet unless you block the port(s) used. Block 80, you
    can't surf anymore :p

    > Well, you did that. After all, MSIE lacks various necessary properties for
    > a webbrowser, f.e. security or proper HTML rendering.


    I see. Well, in that case you are talking about the quality of a
    product, not its basic functionality or intended use. Whether it does a
    good job or has a proper implementation is irrelevant to what type of
    software it is. So please don't accuse anyone of using certain terms
    that may be wrong in the strictest sense. If you get the point across
    that is what matters, not the exact language used. See my other post,
    MSIE defines itself as a web browser, therefore it is a web browser.

    MC
    MC, Nov 3, 2006
    #20
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