MPLS Vs. Point to Point

Discussion in 'Cisco' started by tmed, Mar 13, 2007.

  1. tmed

    tmed Guest

    What are the advantage of using MPLS Vs. Point to Point circuits? I
    know MPLS offers a Mesh.

    Is QoS better on a MPLS vs Point to Point? It appears to be no
    difference to me because QoS would just be configured on the router
    interfaces of a point to point circuit.


    All responses are greatly appreciated. Thank You
    tmed, Mar 13, 2007
    #1
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  2. tmed

    Guest

    In article <>, "tmed" <> writes:
    > What are the advantage of using MPLS Vs. Point to Point circuits? I
    > know MPLS offers a Mesh.
    >
    > Is QoS better on a MPLS vs Point to Point? It appears to be no
    > difference to me because QoS would just be configured on the router
    > interfaces of a point to point circuit.


    My $0.02 worth...

    It's partly a question of who does the QoS. You or the carrier.
    QoS is about managing congestion. When packets are going to get
    dropped, you want to be able to choose which packets they are.

    In a point to point network, you're in control. The congestion
    problems are going to occur on your routers. You (for example)
    have a high speed Ethernet coming into your router and you need
    to funnel it down a narrow pipe to your carrier. But the carrier
    is not going to be dropping anything once it gets into the pipe.
    So you apply a QoS policy on your router(s) and you're done.

    [If the carrier is delivering a virtual point to point circuit and
    their underlying network is congested, this ideal scenario may not
    apply and the carrier may still be dropping your frames].

    In a meshed network, you're not in control. You still have
    congestion possibilities at your edge routers where you choke down
    from an Ethernet LAN to the carrier's tail circuit at the source
    site and you still have to deal with those issues yourself. But in
    addition you now have the problem that many of your sites may be
    sourcing traffic directed to a single destination site, overloading that
    site's tail circuit. The carrier has to decide what traffic gets
    dropped at that choke point.

    So if you're putting together a fully meshed MPLS network, it's
    important to know how the carrier can support your QoS policy
    on their equipment. In general, you tag the frames and the carrier
    applies the policy. Depending on the carrier there may be restrictions
    on the tags they support and the policies they can implement for you.
    , Mar 13, 2007
    #2
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  3. tmed

    Brian V Guest

    "tmed" <> wrote in message
    news:...
    > What are the advantage of using MPLS Vs. Point to Point circuits? I
    > know MPLS offers a Mesh.
    >
    > Is QoS better on a MPLS vs Point to Point? It appears to be no
    > difference to me because QoS would just be configured on the router
    > interfaces of a point to point circuit.
    >
    >
    > All responses are greatly appreciated. Thank You
    >


    The price, typically run about 2/3rds.
    Brian V, Mar 13, 2007
    #3
  4. Hello, Brian!
    You wrote on Tue, 13 Mar 2007 19:47:50 -0400:

    ??>> What are the advantage of using MPLS Vs. Point to Point
    ??>> circuits? I know MPLS offers a Mesh.
    ??>>
    ??>> Is QoS better on a MPLS vs Point to Point? It appears to be no
    ??>> difference to me because QoS would just be configured on the
    ??>> router interfaces of a point to point circuit.
    ??>>
    ??>> All responses are greatly appreciated. Thank You
    ??>>
    BV> The price, typically run about 2/3rds.

    Important note - nominal price. Actual price can be higher and highly depends on
    carrier's QoS policy.

    With best regards,
    Andrey.
    Andrey Tarasov, Mar 14, 2007
    #4
  5. www.BradReese.Com, Mar 14, 2007
    #5
  6. tmed

    stephen Guest

    "tmed" <> wrote in message
    news:...
    > What are the advantage of using MPLS Vs. Point to Point circuits?


    you are really comparing apples with oranges.

    MPLS access links would normally use a point to point circuit anyway.

    MPLS proper is the "cloud" bit operated by the carrier

    in most setups the label switching bit is only within the carrier core
    network, and will not go as far as a customer site - so they could be
    plugging all those access links into a central router instead....

    I
    > know MPLS offers a Mesh.


    some services do - it sounds like you are referring to a L3 VPN over MPLS.

    But some MPLS services across are point to point - Ethernet L2 circuit
    emulation is common.
    >
    > Is QoS better on a MPLS vs Point to Point? It appears to be no
    > difference to me because QoS would just be configured on the router
    > interfaces of a point to point circuit.


    The access links to / from a customer site run IP, so no difference.

    The MPLS core QoS field inside a label is only 3 bits, so the "native" per
    packet QoS is less rich than say DSCP.

    Since the backbone tends to be much faster than customer access links that
    may not matter (as if you never have packets building up in a Q there is not
    much QoS can do to re-order traffic).

    Some MPLS backbones dont do any QoS handling in the core, but just at the PE
    router where customer links meet the high bandwidth bit, since it is
    sometimes simpler and easier for the carrier to throw bandwidth at the
    problem

    >
    >
    > All responses are greatly appreciated. Thank You
    >

    --
    Regards

    - replace xyz with ntl
    stephen, Mar 14, 2007
    #6
  7. tmed

    MEhta

    Joined:
    May 30, 2009
    Messages:
    1
    Hardware Resource Less Used

    IN MPLS you not require to update information about other VPN whers in POint to POInt VPN in your router how data will flow. what about other VPN infomration is with every router. so Hardware resopurces like CPU and Memorary is more in Point to Point Circuit as compared to MPLS.

    .
    MEhta, May 30, 2009
    #7
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