MP3 Quality

Discussion in 'Computer Support' started by Luke O'Malley, Oct 3, 2004.

  1. Ignorance is pervasive! I noted some other posters mentioning the
    bit rate for MP3's. I thought that 128 was the highest available.
    I had made a number of MP3's from MIDI files through a good sound
    module. In every case the bass was very, very attenuated (maybe the
    treble too, but it is not as obvious to my ear). I would assume the
    higher bit rates would solve my bass problem.

    Where do I get an encoder, or whatever to do this?

    Goodwill,
    Luke
    Luke O'Malley, Oct 3, 2004
    #1
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  2. Luke O'Malley

    foolinyu Guest

    "Luke O'Malley" <> wrote in message
    news:knL7d.25860$...
    > Ignorance is pervasive! I noted some other posters mentioning the
    > bit rate for MP3's. I thought that 128 was the highest available.
    > I had made a number of MP3's from MIDI files through a good sound
    > module. In every case the bass was very, very attenuated (maybe the
    > treble too, but it is not as obvious to my ear). I would assume the
    > higher bit rates would solve my bass problem.
    >
    > Where do I get an encoder, or whatever to do this?
    >
    > Goodwill,
    > Luke
    >
    >


    128 is CD quality but not anywhere near the highest rate. I know nothing
    about MIDI files but converting to MP3 files do not by itself alter the bass
    or treble. Higher bit rates would not solve your problem. The problem looks
    like in your set up and not with the MP3 conversion itself.

    I use a retail version of Musicmatch but there is a free download version -
    pretty cool software and simple to use. I also use Magix Audio Cleaning Lab,
    more complicated to use but does a good job correcting bad recordings.
    foolinyu, Oct 3, 2004
    #2
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  3. Luke O'Malley

    Morgan Pugh Guest

    On Sun, 03 Oct 2004 04:38:40 GMT, Luke O'Malley
    <> wrote:

    >Ignorance is pervasive! I noted some other posters mentioning the
    >bit rate for MP3's. I thought that 128 was the highest available.
    >I had made a number of MP3's from MIDI files through a good sound
    >module. In every case the bass was very, very attenuated (maybe the
    >treble too, but it is not as obvious to my ear). I would assume the
    >higher bit rates would solve my bass problem.
    >
    >Where do I get an encoder, or whatever to do this?
    >
    >Goodwill,
    >Luke
    >


    No version of MP3 is CD quality as MP3 us a lossy codec however it is
    possible to get almost transparent sound quality (i.e. it _sounds_ as
    good as CD but technically it isn't).

    LAME is probably the best MP3 codec, you can get compiled binaries
    from www.rarewares.org. The latest (stable) version is 3.96.1 however
    the most used is 3.90.3 as it has been widely tested so it is known to
    give good results. I suggest you check out www.hydrogenaudio.org for
    more information.

    The higest bitrate for MP3 (using LAME) is 320kbps however using a
    constant bitrate is normally a waste of time as you don't always need
    the number of bits per frame so variable bitrate is favoured.

    The bass and treble should get better the higher the bitate goes
    however I have found you will never achieve as good a bass/treble as
    you would with the original audio because of how MP3 works and what
    data is doesn't use.
    --
    Morgan Pugh

    Email (ROT13):
    Web: http://mpugh.co.uk

    PGP Key at http://mpugh.co.uk/pgp.asc
    Morgan Pugh, Oct 4, 2004
    #3
  4. > 128 is CD quality but not anywhere near the highest rate. I know nothing
    > about MIDI files but converting to MP3 files do not by itself alter the bass
    > or treble. Higher bit rates would not solve your problem. The problem looks
    > like in your set up and not with the MP3 conversion itself.
    >
    > I use a retail version of Musicmatch but there is a free download version -
    > pretty cool software and simple to use. I also use Magix Audio Cleaning Lab,
    > more complicated to use but does a good job correcting bad recordings.


    By definition, no MP3 is CD quality, and the typical 128kbps MP3 sounds
    like s* in my opinion. MP3s use a lossy compression scheme, which means
    any information that the encoder "thinks" you won't be able to hear
    anyway is thrown out. Of course what is noticeable to some is not
    noticeable to others, and many other factors go in the mix as well like
    how good your sound system is and what your surroundings are. For
    example, if you have crappy 2 inch speakers in a room with everyone
    talking, you probably won't notice the compression artifacts that are
    inherent with MP3s. But with good ears and a decent sound setup, the
    defects can be quite obvious.

    As far as the original poster's question goes, encoding to MP3 by
    definition certainly does affect bass and treble, as well as everything
    in between. And yes, increasing the bitrate (in other words lowering
    the amount of compression) will certainly make a difference.
    David Matthew Wood, Oct 4, 2004
    #4
  5. In article ,
    Morgan Pugh <> said:
    >
    >On Sun, 03 Oct 2004 04:38:40 GMT, Luke O'Malley
    ><> wrote:
    >
    >>Ignorance is pervasive! I noted some other posters mentioning the
    >>bit rate for MP3's. I thought that 128 was the highest available.
    >>I had made a number of MP3's from MIDI files through a good sound
    >>module. In every case the bass was very, very attenuated (maybe

    >the
    >>treble too, but it is not as obvious to my ear). I would assume

    >the
    >>higher bit rates would solve my bass problem.
    >>
    >>Where do I get an encoder, or whatever to do this?
    >>
    >>Goodwill,
    >>Luke
    >>

    >
    >No version of MP3 is CD quality as MP3 us a lossy codec however it
    >is
    >possible to get almost transparent sound quality (i.e. it _sounds_
    >as
    >good as CD but technically it isn't).
    >
    >LAME is probably the best MP3 codec, you can get compiled binaries
    >from www.rarewares.org. The latest (stable) version is 3.96.1
    >however
    >the most used is 3.90.3 as it has been widely tested so it is known
    >to
    >give good results. I suggest you check out www.hydrogenaudio.org for
    >more information.
    >
    >The higest bitrate for MP3 (using LAME) is 320kbps however using a
    >constant bitrate is normally a waste of time as you don't always
    >need
    >the number of bits per frame so variable bitrate is favoured.
    >
    >The bass and treble should get better the higher the bitate goes
    >however I have found you will never achieve as good a bass/treble as
    >you would with the original audio because of how MP3 works and what
    >data is doesn't use.
    >--
    >Morgan Pugh
    >
    >Email (ROT13):
    >Web: http://mpugh.co.uk
    >
    >PGP Key at http://mpugh.co.uk/pgp.asc
    >
    >


    Many thanks Morgan!

    You have confirmed my suspicion. I realize MP3 is a reduced
    quality. The codec clue came to me from using MS Player; it was
    extremely poor. Then I read they had done it on purpose to promote
    wma format.
    Luke O'Malley, Oct 4, 2004
    #5
  6. Luke O'Malley

    ProfGene Guest

    All good reasons why the Supreme Court decision against Napster was based on
    faulty science. It is not much different than taping from records which is
    not against the law. All the Supreme court did was ruin legitimate mp3 uses
    because they scaredall the websites who made it an "illegal" format to put
    on your free sites.
    "David Matthew Wood" <> wrote in message
    news:...
    > > 128 is CD quality but not anywhere near the highest rate. I know nothing
    > > about MIDI files but converting to MP3 files do not by itself alter the

    bass
    > > or treble. Higher bit rates would not solve your problem. The problem

    looks
    > > like in your set up and not with the MP3 conversion itself.
    > >
    > > I use a retail version of Musicmatch but there is a free download

    version -
    > > pretty cool software and simple to use. I also use Magix Audio Cleaning

    Lab,
    > > more complicated to use but does a good job correcting bad recordings.

    >
    > By definition, no MP3 is CD quality, and the typical 128kbps MP3 sounds
    > like s* in my opinion. MP3s use a lossy compression scheme, which means
    > any information that the encoder "thinks" you won't be able to hear
    > anyway is thrown out. Of course what is noticeable to some is not
    > noticeable to others, and many other factors go in the mix as well like
    > how good your sound system is and what your surroundings are. For
    > example, if you have crappy 2 inch speakers in a room with everyone
    > talking, you probably won't notice the compression artifacts that are
    > inherent with MP3s. But with good ears and a decent sound setup, the
    > defects can be quite obvious.
    >
    > As far as the original poster's question goes, encoding to MP3 by
    > definition certainly does affect bass and treble, as well as everything
    > in between. And yes, increasing the bitrate (in other words lowering
    > the amount of compression) will certainly make a difference.
    ProfGene, Oct 5, 2004
    #6
  7. Luke O'Malley

    anthonyberet Guest

    "Luke O'Malley" <> wrote in message
    news:L7j8d.8106$g%

    > Many thanks Morgan!
    >
    > You have confirmed my suspicion. I realize MP3 is a reduced
    > quality. The codec clue came to me from using MS Player; it was
    > extremely poor. Then I read they had done it on purpose to promote
    > wma format.
    >

    The received wisdom is that an mp3 bitrate of 320 is indistinguishable from
    CD.
    - I don't have such great speakers and don't play load so 128 is generally
    good enough for me.
    It depends on the music too, some encodes better at low rates than others.
    anthonyberet, Oct 10, 2004
    #7
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