Mounting CRS-1 8 slot in rack with scissor lift

Discussion in 'Cisco' started by rjhintz, Jun 13, 2007.

  1. rjhintz

    rjhintz Guest

    Cisco's documentation for mounting a CRS-1 8 slot (650 pounds) shows a
    scissor lift in "Unpacking, Moving, Securing" Figure 10.

    Any recommendations for a source for the scissor lift and a make and
    model?

    Any tips for getting it from the packing pallet into the final,
    secured position without having fingers amputated?
    Thanks.
    rjhintz, Jun 13, 2007
    #1
    1. Advertising

  2. rjhintz <> wrote in news:1181774434.078439.313600
    @q19g2000prn.googlegroups.com:

    > Cisco's documentation for mounting a CRS-1 8 slot (650 pounds) shows a
    > scissor lift in "Unpacking, Moving, Securing" Figure 10.
    >
    > Any recommendations for a source for the scissor lift and a make and
    > model?
    >
    > Any tips for getting it from the packing pallet into the final,
    > secured position without having fingers amputated?
    > Thanks.
    >
    >


    I've found its best to use whats called a "stacker truck" with adjustable
    forks than the scissor lift shown in Cisco's instructions.

    Adjust the forks on the truck so that they fit thru the rack your going to
    mount the chassis in. Sit the chassis on the truck with the back facing the
    front of the truck and the front of the chassis facing the truck operator.
    Slide the truck and the chassis in to the rack, adjust the hight to line up
    with the screw holes. Screw it down, and then lower and remove the truck.

    Most stacker trucks have a second pair of arms on the ground that are used
    to help keep the thing from toppling over, but if you feel they might get
    in the way (like if you have a row of mounting racks) there are models that
    use counter weights instead.

    I can't be certain, but I believe this is the model we use at our plant:

    http://www.bizchair.com/pcbfl-56-25-wes.html

    But you might want to find something with more lifting capacity since your
    chassis is 650lbs.
    SCSI Terminator, Jun 15, 2007
    #2
    1. Advertising

  3. rjhintz

    rjhintz Guest

    On Jun 14, 11:45 pm, SCSI Terminator <> wrote:
    > I've found its best to use whats called a "stacker truck" with adjustable
    > forks than the scissor lift shown in Cisco's instructions.
    >
    > Adjust the forks on the truck so that they fit thru the rack your going to
    > mount the chassis in. Sit the chassis on the truck with the back facing the
    > front of the truck and the front of the chassis facing the truck operator.
    > Slide the truck and the chassis in to the rack, adjust the hight to line up
    > with the screw holes. Screw it down, and then lower and remove the truck.
    >
    > Most stacker trucks have a second pair of arms on the ground that are used
    > to help keep the thing from toppling over, but if you feel they might get
    > in the way (like if you have a row of mounting racks) there are models that
    > use counter weights instead.
    >
    > I can't be certain, but I believe this is the model we use at our plant:
    >
    > http://www.bizchair.com/pcbfl-56-25-wes.html
    >
    > But you might want to find something with more lifting capacity since your
    > chassis is 650lbs.


    Thanks for this lead. The stacker truck looks interesting, but
    wouldn't you have problems maneuvering it in the inter-rack aisle
    space?
    rjhintz, Jun 15, 2007
    #3
  4. rjhintz <> wrote in
    news::

    > On Jun 14, 11:45 pm, SCSI Terminator <> wrote:
    >> I've found its best to use whats called a "stacker truck" with
    >> adjustable forks than the scissor lift shown in Cisco's instructions.
    >>
    >> Adjust the forks on the truck so that they fit thru the rack your
    >> going to mount the chassis in. Sit the chassis on the truck with the
    >> back facing the front of the truck and the front of the chassis
    >> facing the truck operator. Slide the truck and the chassis in to the
    >> rack, adjust the hight to line up with the screw holes. Screw it
    >> down, and then lower and remove the truck.
    >>
    >> Most stacker trucks have a second pair of arms on the ground that are
    >> used to help keep the thing from toppling over, but if you feel they
    >> might get in the way (like if you have a row of mounting racks) there
    >> are models that use counter weights instead.
    >>
    >> I can't be certain, but I believe this is the model we use at our
    >> plant:
    >>
    >> http://www.bizchair.com/pcbfl-56-25-wes.html
    >>
    >> But you might want to find something with more lifting capacity since
    >> your chassis is 650lbs.

    >
    > Thanks for this lead. The stacker truck looks interesting, but
    > wouldn't you have problems maneuvering it in the inter-rack aisle
    > space?
    >
    >


    Since we have them installed in a production factory environment (can
    you guess what we produce :D ), our isles are kinda wide to allow the
    test operators ease in sliding the blades in and out of our multiple
    test chassis. Also all of our racks have caster wheels on them so we can
    move them out into the open for installations if necessary. Hence we
    don't have space problems with the lifts were using.

    Your right thou, and I could see my method being difficult in the narrow
    and dimly lit isles of a typical data center, or networking closet. In
    that kind of environment, the method Cisco shows might be more ideal.
    But the challenge is that it does require you to be able to slide the
    chassis off the scissors lift and on to the rails in the rack. And if
    you really do have to do that with it full of blades, sliding a 650lb
    weight is not going to be too easy or fun in a cramped space. You might
    haft to take things out to lighten it, make it more manageable. After
    all, even if you have enough room to get 4 people around it, your still
    talking about 150lb per person with it fully loaded.

    Look in the phone book, maybe theres an industrial supply store or
    rental center nearby, look for places that sell/rent forklifts and the
    like. Take some measurements, and go out and see whats available. Also
    maybe the sales staff will have better ideas on how to solve your
    problem than I ever could, since I can't see your exact situation thru
    the internet.
    SCSI Terminator, Jun 16, 2007
    #4
  5. rjhintz

    rjhintz Guest

    Thanks for your reply. I've been looking at different materiel
    handling catalogs, as you suggest.

    One interesting added difficulty is that Cisco specifically cautions
    against taking out any of the components before mounting, which is my
    usual approach to lightening the device so it's easier to manhandle
    into the rack.
    rjhintz, Jun 16, 2007
    #5
  6. rjhintz <> wrote in news:1182003162.507638.151690
    @n15g2000prd.googlegroups.com:

    > Thanks for your reply. I've been looking at different materiel
    > handling catalogs, as you suggest.
    >
    > One interesting added difficulty is that Cisco specifically cautions
    > against taking out any of the components before mounting, which is my
    > usual approach to lightening the device so it's easier to manhandle
    > into the rack.
    >
    >


    One has to wonder why they provide instructions on how to remove and
    install cards:

    http://www.ciscosystems.com/univercd/cc/td/doc/product/core/crs/crs1
    _hw/qlcchas/lcch5.htm

    if they never intended you, the end user, to do it.

    If you do get over your fears and decide to remove things to lighten it,
    start with the power supplies, fan tray, ect. They are fairly rugged, and
    the risk of damage is low.

    If it comes down to pulling the blades, a word of caution that's not
    mentioned in their instructions: Be very careful with the backplane
    connector on the blade, and make sure you give it a good inspection for
    damage before you re-insert the blade.

    A damaged connector on a blade is easy for us to fix with the right
    equipment and repair parts, but backplanes on the other hand are nearly
    imposable.

    Hopefully you will find a way that keeps all this from being necessary.
    Good luck to you.
    SCSI Terminator, Jun 17, 2007
    #6
  7. rjhintz

    rjhintz Guest

    Here's the text of Cisco's caution about removing components:
    "Do not remove any components from the chassis before moving or
    mounting it. The chassis is shipped
    configured for maximum stability for moving and mounting; removing any
    cards, impedance carriers, or
    slot covers can cause chassis misalignment and damage during moving
    and mounting."

    So, it's not to preclude removing a card or a power supply for
    maintenance. You might check with product engineering to see if this
    is a rational engineering concern or something invented by Legal. It
    sounds plausible enough. Interesting that power supplies, typically
    the heaviest components, aren't specifically called out. Of course,
    those are the first that we pull before trying to mount a heavy
    chassis.

    Thanks for the caution about backplane connectors. I've never had a
    problem with this myself, counting lots of removals and insertions,
    but I can see that it might be an issue (and there's always a first
    time).
    rjhintz, Jun 17, 2007
    #7
  8. Under "Transport to the Installation Site" you find the following 2
    phrases:


    - Use the dolly only when the chassis is empty. Before attaching the dolly,
    remove all components (power shelves, power modules, fan trays, cards, and
    other modules) from the chassis.

    - Install impedance carriers in the card slots to provide support to keep
    the chassis square during movement and installation. Do not move the
    chassis without the carriers installed.



    Now I realize they are not talking about the 8 slot model, but I bet the
    same rule applies. You should be fine without the modules, as long as slot
    covers / impedance carriers are installed in their place to keep the
    chassis rigid.

    I don't work for Cisco directly, so I can't really say from where that
    cautionary statement is coming from. I can say that we often move the
    chassis without anything in them, slot covers, or otherwise, and haven't
    seen any warping or fatigue, so the system is not as fragile as they would
    lead you to belive.

    I'd say Cisco's caution, while likely originating from a rational
    engineering concern, is probably also intentional overkill, and kept around
    for legal reasons, mostly due to the extreme cost of the product. Which
    means, since you probably have a warranty, it would probably be best to
    follow their advice and not to do anything to jeopardize it, even if all of
    the extra precautions realy arn't that neccessary.
    SCSI Terminator, Jun 17, 2007
    #8
  9. SCSI Terminator <> wrote in
    news:Xns99529AFE3CD89SCSITerminator@216.196.97.131:

    > Under "Transport to the Installation Site" you find the following 2
    > phrases:
    >
    >
    > - Use the dolly only when the chassis is empty. Before attaching the
    > dolly, remove all components (power shelves, power modules, fan trays,
    > cards, and other modules) from the chassis.
    >
    > - Install impedance carriers in the card slots to provide support to
    > keep the chassis square during movement and installation. Do not move
    > the chassis without the carriers installed.
    >
    >
    >
    > Now I realize they are not talking about the 8 slot model, but I bet
    > the same rule applies. You should be fine without the modules, as long
    > as slot covers / impedance carriers are installed in their place to
    > keep the chassis rigid.
    >
    > I don't work for Cisco directly, so I can't really say from where that
    > cautionary statement is coming from. I can say that we often move the
    > chassis without anything in them, slot covers, or otherwise, and
    > haven't seen any warping or fatigue, so the system is not as fragile
    > as they would lead you to belive.
    >
    > I'd say Cisco's caution, while likely originating from a rational
    > engineering concern, is probably also intentional overkill, and kept
    > around for legal reasons, mostly due to the extreme cost of the
    > product. Which means, since you probably have a warranty, it would
    > probably be best to follow their advice and not to do anything to
    > jeopardize it, even if all of the extra precautions realy arn't that
    > neccessary.
    >


    Damn link at the top got chopped off, here it is again.

    http://www.cisco.com/en/US/products/ps5763/products_pre-
    installation_guide_chapter09186a0080472926.html
    SCSI Terminator, Jun 17, 2007
    #9
    1. Advertising

Want to reply to this thread or ask your own question?

It takes just 2 minutes to sign up (and it's free!). Just click the sign up button to choose a username and then you can ask your own questions on the forum.
Similar Threads
  1. Tony Whitaker

    Re: Any way to lift image from my retina?

    Tony Whitaker, Sep 5, 2003, in forum: Digital Photography
    Replies:
    2
    Views:
    320
    Tony Whitaker
    Sep 7, 2003
  2. Dingo

    Does your camera "lift"?

    Dingo, Dec 24, 2006, in forum: Digital Photography
    Replies:
    4
    Views:
    357
    Dingo
    Dec 24, 2006
  3. rjhintz
    Replies:
    3
    Views:
    1,024
  4. Steve Pfister

    Rack mounting an MSE 3310

    Steve Pfister, Feb 25, 2013, in forum: Cisco
    Replies:
    0
    Views:
    504
    Steve Pfister
    Feb 25, 2013
  5. O'LOAN
    Replies:
    0
    Views:
    8,627
    O'LOAN
    Apr 30, 2013
Loading...

Share This Page