Mounting Canon 70-200 On Tripod

Discussion in 'Digital Photography' started by Simon, Jun 4, 2006.

  1. Simon

    Simon Guest

    This is a really naive question, however I bought a 70-200 because I want to
    handhold with decent shutter speeds in fairly low light. However, I noticed
    that it has a strange tripod fixing.

    I had a quick look around the internet and there were 'Wibley heads' of
    something like that, but they were silly prices. Is there something that is
    actually a reasonable price, so I can use it on a tripod for long periods of
    shooting (just to take the weight off)?
    Simon, Jun 4, 2006
    #1
    1. Advertising

  2. Simon

    Simon Guest

    Sorry, typo. I meant to say monopod, not tripod.


    "Simon" <> wrote in message
    news:...
    > This is a really naive question, however I bought a 70-200 because I want
    > to handhold with decent shutter speeds in fairly low light. However, I
    > noticed that it has a strange tripod fixing.
    >
    > I had a quick look around the internet and there were 'Wibley heads' of
    > something like that, but they were silly prices. Is there something that
    > is actually a reasonable price, so I can use it on a tripod for long
    > periods of shooting (just to take the weight off)?
    >
    Simon, Jun 4, 2006
    #2
    1. Advertising

  3. Simon

    Mark² Guest

    Simon wrote:
    > Sorry, typo. I meant to say monopod, not tripod.


    If you're shooting sports or wildlife from a distance, you should be able to
    happily shoot by simpy mounting the lens (via the lens' built-in tripod
    mount) directly to the monopod. If you need to turn it in vertical
    orientation, you simply turn the knob on the tripod mount and then spin the
    camera body while the lens stays put.
    --Only on rare occasion do I feel the need for using a ball head on a
    monopod--usually only for close proximity shots of things over-head or near
    the ground.

    >
    >
    > "Simon" <> wrote in message
    > news:...
    >> This is a really naive question, however I bought a 70-200 because I
    >> want to handhold with decent shutter speeds in fairly low light. However,
    >> I noticed that it has a strange tripod fixing.
    >>
    >> I had a quick look around the internet and there were 'Wibley heads'
    >> of something like that, but they were silly prices. Is there
    >> something that is actually a reasonable price, so I can use it on a
    >> tripod for long periods of shooting (just to take the weight off)?


    --
    Images (Plus Snaps & Grabs) by Mark² at:
    www.pbase.com/markuson
    Mark², Jun 4, 2006
    #3
  4. Simon

    Simon Guest

    Cheers Mark

    I must admit the problem is due to, Mmm, maybe too much alcohol! Good job
    it has IS! ;-)))

    You are dead right though, the tripod mount spins.


    "Mark²" <mjmorgan(lowest even number here)@cox..net> wrote in message
    news:dFHgg.6049$rS6.2920@fed1read11...
    > Simon wrote:
    >
    > If you're shooting sports or wildlife from a distance, you should be able
    > to happily shoot by simpy mounting the lens (via the lens' built-in tripod
    > mount) directly to the monopod. If you need to turn it in vertical
    > orientation, you simply turn the knob on the tripod mount and then spin
    > the camera body while the lens stays put.


    > --Only on rare occasion do I feel the need for using a ball head on a
    > monopod--usually only for close proximity shots of things over-head or
    > near the ground.
    >
    Simon, Jun 4, 2006
    #4
  5. Simon

    Dave Guest

    Mark,

    Can you recommend a ball head for a monopod? I'm using the same lens as
    well.

    Dave

    "Mark²" <mjmorgan(lowest even number here)@cox..net> wrote in message
    news:dFHgg.6049$rS6.2920@fed1read11...
    > Simon wrote:
    >> Sorry, typo. I meant to say monopod, not tripod.

    >
    > If you're shooting sports or wildlife from a distance, you should be able
    > to happily shoot by simpy mounting the lens (via the lens' built-in tripod
    > mount) directly to the monopod. If you need to turn it in vertical
    > orientation, you simply turn the knob on the tripod mount and then spin
    > the camera body while the lens stays put.
    > --Only on rare occasion do I feel the need for using a ball head on a
    > monopod--usually only for close proximity shots of things over-head or
    > near the ground.
    >
    >>
    >>
    >> "Simon" <> wrote in message
    >> news:...
    >>> This is a really naive question, however I bought a 70-200 because I
    >>> want to handhold with decent shutter speeds in fairly low light.
    >>> However, I noticed that it has a strange tripod fixing.
    >>>
    >>> I had a quick look around the internet and there were 'Wibley heads'
    >>> of something like that, but they were silly prices. Is there
    >>> something that is actually a reasonable price, so I can use it on a
    >>> tripod for long periods of shooting (just to take the weight off)?

    >
    > --
    > Images (Plus Snaps & Grabs) by Mark² at:
    > www.pbase.com/markuson
    >
    >
    Dave, Jun 4, 2006
    #5
  6. Simon wrote:
    > Cheers Mark
    >
    > I must admit the problem is due to, Mmm, maybe too much alcohol! Good job
    > it has IS! ;-)))
    >
    > You are dead right though, the tripod mount spins.
    >
    >
    > "Mark²" <mjmorgan(lowest even number here)@cox..net> wrote in message
    > news:dFHgg.6049$rS6.2920@fed1read11...
    >> Simon wrote:
    >>
    >> If you're shooting sports or wildlife from a distance, you should be able
    >> to happily shoot by simpy mounting the lens (via the lens' built-in tripod
    >> mount) directly to the monopod. If you need to turn it in vertical
    >> orientation, you simply turn the knob on the tripod mount and then spin
    >> the camera body while the lens stays put.

    >

    Looks like you are all drunk, but Mark sq. posts correctly, even if his
    info is sometimes inaccurate. viz.: The lens turns with the body when
    you loosen the tightening nut on the mono/tripod bracket.

    --
    John McWilliams
    John McWilliams, Jun 5, 2006
    #6
  7. Simon

    Mark² Guest

    John McWilliams wrote:
    > Simon wrote:
    >> Cheers Mark
    >>
    >> I must admit the problem is due to, Mmm, maybe too much alcohol! Good job
    >> it has IS! ;-)))
    >>
    >> You are dead right though, the tripod mount spins.
    >>
    >>
    >> "Mark²" <mjmorgan(lowest even number here)@cox..net> wrote in message
    >> news:dFHgg.6049$rS6.2920@fed1read11...
    >>> Simon wrote:
    >>>
    >>> If you're shooting sports or wildlife from a distance, you should
    >>> be able to happily shoot by simpy mounting the lens (via the lens'
    >>> built-in tripod mount) directly to the monopod. If you need to
    >>> turn it in vertical orientation, you simply turn the knob on the
    >>> tripod mount and then spin the camera body while the lens stays put.

    >>

    > Looks like you are all drunk, but Mark sq. posts correctly, even if
    > his info is sometimes inaccurate. viz.: The lens turns with the body
    > when you loosen the tightening nut on the mono/tripod bracket.


    I left out two words in my haste:
    -The lens' tripod MOUNT stays put, of course.

    --
    Images (Plus Snaps & Grabs) by Mark² at:
    www.pbase.com/markuson
    Mark², Jun 5, 2006
    #7
  8. Simon

    Mark² Guest

    John McWilliams wrote:
    > Simon wrote:
    >> Cheers Mark
    >>
    >> I must admit the problem is due to, Mmm, maybe too much alcohol! Good job
    >> it has IS! ;-)))
    >>
    >> You are dead right though, the tripod mount spins.
    >>
    >>
    >> "Mark²" <mjmorgan(lowest even number here)@cox..net> wrote in message
    >> news:dFHgg.6049$rS6.2920@fed1read11...
    >>> Simon wrote:
    >>>
    >>> If you're shooting sports or wildlife from a distance, you should
    >>> be able to happily shoot by simpy mounting the lens (via the lens'
    >>> built-in tripod mount) directly to the monopod. If you need to
    >>> turn it in vertical orientation, you simply turn the knob on the
    >>> tripod mount and then spin the camera body while the lens stays put.

    >>

    > Looks like you are all drunk, but Mark sq. posts correctly, even if
    > his info is sometimes inaccurate. viz.: The lens turns with the body
    > when you loosen the tightening nut on the mono/tripod bracket.


    --
    Images (Plus Snaps & Grabs) by Mark² at:
    www.pbase.com/markuson
    Mark², Jun 5, 2006
    #8
  9. Simon

    Bob Guest

    "Mark²" <mjmorgan(lowest even number here)@cox..net> wrote in message
    news:xiKgg.6056$rS6.1735@fed1read11...
    > John McWilliams wrote:
    >> Simon wrote:
    >>> Cheers Mark
    >>>
    >>> I must admit the problem is due to, Mmm, maybe too much alcohol! Good
    >>> job it has IS! ;-)))
    >>>
    >>> You are dead right though, the tripod mount spins.
    >>>
    >>>
    >>> "Mark²" <mjmorgan(lowest even number here)@cox..net> wrote in message
    >>> news:dFHgg.6049$rS6.2920@fed1read11...
    >>>> Simon wrote:
    >>>>
    >>>> If you're shooting sports or wildlife from a distance, you should
    >>>> be able to happily shoot by simpy mounting the lens (via the lens'
    >>>> built-in tripod mount) directly to the monopod. If you need to
    >>>> turn it in vertical orientation, you simply turn the knob on the
    >>>> tripod mount and then spin the camera body while the lens stays put.
    >>>

    >> Looks like you are all drunk, but Mark sq. posts correctly, even if
    >> his info is sometimes inaccurate. viz.: The lens turns with the body
    >> when you loosen the tightening nut on the mono/tripod bracket.

    >
    > I left out two words in my haste:
    > -The lens' tripod MOUNT stays put, of course.
    >


    You're both wrong. He already admitted that he had been drinking so
    EVERYTHING was spinning.

    Bob
    Bob, Jun 5, 2006
    #9
  10. Simon

    Mark² Guest

    Bob wrote:
    > "Mark²" <mjmorgan(lowest even number here)@cox..net> wrote in message
    > news:xiKgg.6056$rS6.1735@fed1read11...
    >> John McWilliams wrote:
    >>> Simon wrote:
    >>>> Cheers Mark
    >>>>
    >>>> I must admit the problem is due to, Mmm, maybe too much alcohol!
    >>>> Good job it has IS! ;-)))
    >>>>
    >>>> You are dead right though, the tripod mount spins.
    >>>>
    >>>>
    >>>> "Mark²" <mjmorgan(lowest even number here)@cox..net> wrote in
    >>>> message news:dFHgg.6049$rS6.2920@fed1read11...
    >>>>> Simon wrote:
    >>>>>
    >>>>> If you're shooting sports or wildlife from a distance, you should
    >>>>> be able to happily shoot by simpy mounting the lens (via the lens'
    >>>>> built-in tripod mount) directly to the monopod. If you need to
    >>>>> turn it in vertical orientation, you simply turn the knob on the
    >>>>> tripod mount and then spin the camera body while the lens stays
    >>>>> put.
    >>>>
    >>> Looks like you are all drunk, but Mark sq. posts correctly, even if
    >>> his info is sometimes inaccurate. viz.: The lens turns with the body
    >>> when you loosen the tightening nut on the mono/tripod bracket.

    >>
    >> I left out two words in my haste:
    >> -The lens' tripod MOUNT stays put, of course.
    >>

    >
    > You're both wrong. He already admitted that he had been drinking so
    > EVERYTHING was spinning.


    Ya, but I don't drink...so what's my excuse?
    :)

    --
    Images (Plus Snaps & Grabs) by Mark² at:
    www.pbase.com/markuson
    Mark², Jun 5, 2006
    #10
  11. Simon

    Pat Guest

    As previous posts said, you usually don't use any type of head on top
    of a monopod. You just screw the monopod in to the collar and call it
    a day. You just move the monopod around. That's why you are using a
    monopod, not a tripod. The only exception would be if you are shooting
    at unusual angles such as a air show or maybe really fast insects. If
    you need the head, then you should go to someplace like
    bhphotovvideo.com and start your research because of your special
    circumstance.
    Pat, Jun 5, 2006
    #11
  12. Simon

    Eric Miller Guest

    "Pat" <> wrote in message
    news:...
    > As previous posts said, you usually don't use any type of head on top
    > of a monopod. You just screw the monopod in to the collar and call it
    > a day. You just move the monopod around. That's why you are using a
    > monopod, not a tripod. The only exception would be if you are shooting
    > at unusual angles such as a air show or maybe really fast insects. If
    > you need the head, then you should go to someplace like
    > bhphotovvideo.com and start your research because of your special
    > circumstance.
    >


    I find a tilt head to be very useful. It only tilts in one direction.

    <http://www.bhphotovideo.com/bnh/controller/home?O=productlist&A=details&Q=&sku=5498&is=REG&addedTroughType=categoryNavigation>

    Eric Miller
    Eric Miller, Jun 5, 2006
    #12
  13. Simon

    Eric Miller Guest

    "Pat" <> wrote in message
    news:...
    > As previous posts said, you usually don't use any type of head on top
    > of a monopod. You just screw the monopod in to the collar and call it
    > a day. You just move the monopod around. That's why you are using a
    > monopod, not a tripod. The only exception would be if you are shooting
    > at unusual angles such as a air show or maybe really fast insects. If
    > you need the head, then you should go to someplace like
    > bhphotovvideo.com and start your research because of your special
    > circumstance.
    >


    I find a tilt head to be very useful. It only tilts in one direction.

    <http://www.bhphotovideo.com/bnh/controller/home?O=productlist&A=details&Q=&sku=5498&is=REG&addedTroughType=categoryNavigation>

    Eric Miller
    Eric Miller, Jun 5, 2006
    #13
  14. Simon

    Mark² Guest

    Dave wrote:
    > Mark,
    >
    > Can you recommend a ball head for a monopod? I'm using the same lens
    > as well.


    You might want to look at ball heads from FLM.
    What makes them particularly useful is their unique tilt-only function.
    The way it works is there is a third adjustment knob that cause the ball to
    "lock" but in only one direction.
    This means that you can tilt it up and down without any side or other
    rolling movements. For monopods, this would be a nice option, since
    (obviously) you don't need to pan...but only tilt.
    If you can find a tilt-only head, that would also be a good option...but I
    like how most ball heads allow a more precise tension adjustment. I have an
    FLM head with the tilt-only function and it works beautifully for this.

    -Mark²

    >
    > Dave
    >
    > "Mark²" <mjmorgan(lowest even number here)@cox..net> wrote in message
    > news:dFHgg.6049$rS6.2920@fed1read11...
    >> Simon wrote:
    >>> Sorry, typo. I meant to say monopod, not tripod.

    >>
    >> If you're shooting sports or wildlife from a distance, you should be
    >> able to happily shoot by simpy mounting the lens (via the lens'
    >> built-in tripod mount) directly to the monopod. If you need to turn
    >> it in vertical orientation, you simply turn the knob on the tripod
    >> mount and then spin the camera body while the lens stays put.
    >> --Only on rare occasion do I feel the need for using a ball head on a
    >> monopod--usually only for close proximity shots of things over-head
    >> or near the ground.
    >>
    >>>
    >>>
    >>> "Simon" <> wrote in message
    >>> news:...
    >>>> This is a really naive question, however I bought a 70-200 because
    >>>> I want to handhold with decent shutter speeds in fairly low light.
    >>>> However, I noticed that it has a strange tripod fixing.
    >>>>
    >>>> I had a quick look around the internet and there were 'Wibley
    >>>> heads' of something like that, but they were silly prices. Is
    >>>> there something that is actually a reasonable price, so I can use
    >>>> it on a tripod for long periods of shooting (just to take the
    >>>> weight off)?

    >>
    >> --
    >> Images (Plus Snaps & Grabs) by Mark² at:
    >> www.pbase.com/markuson


    --
    Images (Plus Snaps & Grabs) by Mark² at:
    www.pbase.com/markuson
    Mark², Jun 6, 2006
    #14
  15. Simon

    Paul J Gans Guest

    John McWilliams <> wrote:
    >Simon wrote:
    >> Cheers Mark
    >>
    >> I must admit the problem is due to, Mmm, maybe too much alcohol! Good job
    >> it has IS! ;-)))
    >>
    >> You are dead right though, the tripod mount spins.
    >>
    >>
    >> "Mark?" <mjmorgan(lowest even number here)@cox..net> wrote in message
    >> news:dFHgg.6049$rS6.2920@fed1read11...
    >>> Simon wrote:
    >>>
    >>> If you're shooting sports or wildlife from a distance, you should be able
    >>> to happily shoot by simpy mounting the lens (via the lens' built-in tripod
    >>> mount) directly to the monopod. If you need to turn it in vertical
    >>> orientation, you simply turn the knob on the tripod mount and then spin
    >>> the camera body while the lens stays put.

    >>

    >Looks like you are all drunk, but Mark sq. posts correctly, even if his
    >info is sometimes inaccurate. viz.: The lens turns with the body when
    >you loosen the tightening nut on the mono/tripod bracket.


    Agreed. And it also locks in at 90 degree increments so that
    you can line up portrait shots and then switch back to landscape.

    --- Paul J. Gans
    Paul J Gans, Jun 6, 2006
    #15
  16. Simon

    Mark² Guest

    Paul J Gans wrote:
    > John McWilliams <> wrote:
    >> Simon wrote:
    >>> Cheers Mark
    >>>
    >>> I must admit the problem is due to, Mmm, maybe too much alcohol!
    >>> Good job it has IS! ;-)))
    >>>
    >>> You are dead right though, the tripod mount spins.
    >>>
    >>>
    >>> "Mark?" <mjmorgan(lowest even number here)@cox..net> wrote in
    >>> message news:dFHgg.6049$rS6.2920@fed1read11...
    >>>> Simon wrote:
    >>>>
    >>>> If you're shooting sports or wildlife from a distance, you should
    >>>> be able to happily shoot by simpy mounting the lens (via the lens'
    >>>> built-in tripod mount) directly to the monopod. If you need to
    >>>> turn it in vertical orientation, you simply turn the knob on the
    >>>> tripod mount and then spin the camera body while the lens stays
    >>>> put.
    >>>

    >> Looks like you are all drunk, but Mark sq. posts correctly, even if
    >> his info is sometimes inaccurate. viz.: The lens turns with the body
    >> when you loosen the tightening nut on the mono/tripod bracket.

    >
    > Agreed. And it also locks in at 90 degree increments so that
    > you can line up portrait shots and then switch back to landscape.


    Not on my Canon 70-200 2.8 IS L...
    It has no "increments."
    All it has is an alignment marking to let you know when it's exactly
    upright...
    ....but there is no such indication or lock to indicate any position other
    than this single upright marker on the mount (which you must eye-ball to
    line up with the black line on the lens).

    I wish there was a 90 degree "click" or some some indication...

    -Mark²

    PS--note my correction of my above ommision. -Of course the tripod mount
    stays put, while the camera and lens turn in place.

    --
    Images (Plus Snaps & Grabs) by Mark² at:
    www.pbase.com/markuson
    Mark², Jun 6, 2006
    #16
  17. Simon

    Paul J Gans Guest

    "Mark?" <mjmorgan(lowest even number here)@cox..net> wrote:
    >Paul J Gans wrote:
    >> John McWilliams <> wrote:
    >>> Simon wrote:
    >>>> Cheers Mark
    >>>>
    >>>> I must admit the problem is due to, Mmm, maybe too much alcohol!
    >>>> Good job it has IS! ;-)))
    >>>>
    >>>> You are dead right though, the tripod mount spins.
    >>>>
    >>>>
    >>>> "Mark?" <mjmorgan(lowest even number here)@cox..net> wrote in
    >>>> message news:dFHgg.6049$rS6.2920@fed1read11...
    >>>>> Simon wrote:
    >>>>>
    >>>>> If you're shooting sports or wildlife from a distance, you should
    >>>>> be able to happily shoot by simpy mounting the lens (via the lens'
    >>>>> built-in tripod mount) directly to the monopod. If you need to
    >>>>> turn it in vertical orientation, you simply turn the knob on the
    >>>>> tripod mount and then spin the camera body while the lens stays
    >>>>> put.
    >>>>
    >>> Looks like you are all drunk, but Mark sq. posts correctly, even if
    >>> his info is sometimes inaccurate. viz.: The lens turns with the body
    >>> when you loosen the tightening nut on the mono/tripod bracket.

    >>
    >> Agreed. And it also locks in at 90 degree increments so that
    >> you can line up portrait shots and then switch back to landscape.


    >Not on my Canon 70-200 2.8 IS L...
    >It has no "increments."
    >All it has is an alignment marking to let you know when it's exactly
    >upright...
    >...but there is no such indication or lock to indicate any position other
    >than this single upright marker on the mount (which you must eye-ball to
    >line up with the black line on the lens).


    >I wish there was a 90 degree "click" or some some indication...


    >-Mark?


    >PS--note my correction of my above ommision. -Of course the tripod mount
    >stays put, while the camera and lens turn in place.


    I've checked mine rather closely and you are quite right.
    There is, however, a large red dot on the mount which matches
    up with the red dot on the body. It should not be too hard
    to use the mount to draw a circle and then subdivide the circle
    into 90 degree quadrants.

    You could then transfer the marks to the mount with a bit of
    nail polish (in some color other than red). You really only
    need one, at 90 degrees. Then after mounting the tripot mount,
    you could spin it so that the mark on the body lines up with
    your new mark.

    In fact, I might try that myself!

    ---- Paul J. Gans
    Paul J Gans, Jun 11, 2006
    #17
    1. Advertising

Want to reply to this thread or ask your own question?

It takes just 2 minutes to sign up (and it's free!). Just click the sign up button to choose a username and then you can ask your own questions on the forum.
Similar Threads
  1. JC Dill

    tripod for a 1d with 70-200 lens

    JC Dill, Sep 9, 2003, in forum: Digital Photography
    Replies:
    22
    Views:
    742
    Paul Repacholi
    Sep 11, 2003
  2. Replies:
    4
    Views:
    357
  3. This old Bob

    Bogen / Manfrotto Tripod/Head for under $200?

    This old Bob, Dec 13, 2005, in forum: Digital Photography
    Replies:
    6
    Views:
    2,608
    zeitgeist
    Dec 14, 2005
  4. Steve Carpenter

    Tripod mounting question

    Steve Carpenter, Jul 8, 2007, in forum: Digital Photography
    Replies:
    10
    Views:
    546
    Chris Malcolm
    Jul 12, 2007
  5. John Smith

    Tripod and Ball Head for Nikon D3 and 70-200 f/2.8

    John Smith, May 28, 2008, in forum: Digital Photography
    Replies:
    1
    Views:
    1,045
    John Smith
    May 29, 2008
Loading...

Share This Page