More Canon 20d focusing issues

Discussion in 'Digital Photography' started by Todd.J.Olson@gmail.com, Sep 27, 2005.

  1. Guest

    Hello,

    Let me start off by saying I'm very new to photography. I bought the
    20d to take to Europe in hopes of getting some large prints made. It's
    my first D-SLR. Ever since I bought this camera I've had trouble
    getting photos to come out well. I don't think I've really ever gotten
    a photo in a 'mode' setting to come out clear. I always have soft
    edges and overexposure. I tend to shoot mainly in manual mode, but
    sometimes still have problems. My biggest issue is getting focused
    clear images. If I'm just taking photos of friends around town, I
    typically set the camera around 1/100th (in the time-priority mode) of
    a second to keep from blurring the shot with my unstead hands.
    Sometimes this works, sometimes it doesn't. Recently I went to a
    wedding and did this same thing, and almost every photo I took came out
    blurry. Now I have taken some crisp shots, but they are almost always
    from far away on nice sunny days. I like to go hiking and take the
    camera, but the dark woods don't always make the greatest shots.

    Here are two photos I took this morning on my couch. The data from the
    shots follows. The first shot was in AE mode set. The second was in
    fully automatic. Notice how soft the edges are on the fully automatic
    shot. This is what keeps happening every time I take a photo. Does
    anyone know what is going on, or care to suggest how to resolve this?

    http://filebox.vt.edu/users/tolson/photos/IMG_2130.JPG (forgot to
    turn down ISO from last night, a little grainy)

    http://filebox.vt.edu/users/tolson/photos/IMG_2132.JPG

    Here's a shot from the wedding that came terrible just to show you what
    I'm so confused about.

    http://filebox.vt.edu/users/tolson/photos/IMG_2104.JPG

    Thanks for any insight, -Todd

    I'm using a canon 28-105, seen here: (not L-glass)
    http://consumer.usa.canon.com/ir/controller?act=ModelDetailAct&fcategoryid=149&modelid=7442



    wedding photo
    ------------------------------
    File Name
    IMG_2104.CR2
    Camera Model
    Canon EOS 20D
    Shooting Date/Time
    9/17/2005 3:27:06 PM
    Shooting Mode
    Manual Exposure
    Tv( Shutter Speed )
    1/80
    Av( Aperture Value )
    16.0
    Metering Mode
    Evaluative Metering
    ISO Speed
    400
    Lens
    28.0 - 105.0 mm
    Focal Length
    35.0 mm
    Image Size
    3504x2336
    Image Quality
    RAW
    Flash
    Off
    White Balance Mode
    Auto
    AF Mode
    One-Shot AF
    Parameters Settings
    Contrast Mid. High
    Sharpness Mid. High
    Color saturation Mid. High
    Color tone 0
    Color Space
    sRGB
    Noise Reduction
    Off
    File Size
    7912 KB


    manual
    ---------------------------------------
    File Name
    IMG_2130.CR2
    Camera Model
    Canon EOS 20D
    Shooting Date/Time
    9/27/2005 1:35:42 PM
    Shooting Mode
    Shutter-Priority AE
    Tv( Shutter Speed )
    1/100
    Av( Aperture Value )
    4.0
    Metering Mode
    Evaluative Metering
    Exposure Compensation
    0
    ISO Speed
    800
    Lens
    28.0 - 105.0 mm
    Focal Length
    65.0 mm
    Image Size
    3504x2336
    Image Quality
    RAW
    Flash
    Off
    White Balance Mode
    Auto
    AF Mode
    Manual Focus
    Parameters Settings
    Contrast Mid. High
    Sharpness Mid. High
    Color saturation Mid. High
    Color tone 0
    Color Space
    sRGB
    Noise Reduction
    Off
    File Size
    7428 KB

    fully automatic
    --------------------------------------
    File Name
    IMG_2132.JPG
    Camera Model
    Canon EOS 20D
    Shooting Date/Time
    9/27/2005 1:37:55 PM
    Shooting Mode
    Auto
    Tv( Shutter Speed )
    1/60
    Av( Aperture Value )
    4.0
    Metering Mode
    Evaluative Metering
    Exposure Compensation
    0
    ISO Speed
    400
    Lens
    28.0 - 105.0 mm
    Focal Length
    82.0 mm
    Image Size
    2544x1696
    Image Quality
    Fine
    Flash
    On
    Flash Type
    Built-In Flash
    Flash Exposure Compensation
    0
    Red-eye Reduction
    Off
    Shutter curtain sync
    1st-curtain sync
    White Balance Mode
    Auto
    AF Mode
    AI Focus AF
    Parameters Settings
    Contrast Mid. High
    Sharpness Mid. High
    Color saturation Mid. High
    Color tone 0
    Color Space
    sRGB
    Noise Reduction
    Off
    File Size
    1641 KB
     
    , Sep 27, 2005
    #1
    1. Advertising

  2. wrote:
    > Hello,
    >
    > Let me start off by saying I'm very new to photography. I bought the
    > 20d to take to Europe in hopes of getting some large prints made.
    > It's my first D-SLR. Ever since I bought this camera I've had trouble
    > getting photos to come out well. I don't think I've really ever
    > gotten a photo in a 'mode' setting to come out clear. I always have
    > soft edges and overexposure. I tend to shoot mainly in manual mode,
    > but sometimes still have problems. My biggest issue is getting
    > focused clear images. If I'm just taking photos of friends around
    > town, I typically set the camera around 1/100th (in the time-priority
    > mode) of a second to keep from blurring the shot with my unstead
    > hands. Sometimes this works, sometimes it doesn't. Recently I went
    > to a wedding and did this same thing, and almost every photo I took
    > came out blurry. Now I have taken some crisp shots, but they are
    > almost always from far away on nice sunny days. I like to go hiking
    > and take the camera, but the dark woods don't always make the
    > greatest shots.


    I don't see a real problem with edge sharpness, rather I see that the
    plane of focus is not on the same plane as the subject. In short the images
    of the book are sharp where the distance from the lens to the cover is
    within the DOF but since the cover is not exactly perpendicular to the axis
    of the lens, the parts that are not sharp are further or closer than the
    DOF. You need to try a smaller aperture.



    >
    > Here are two photos I took this morning on my couch. The data from
    > the shots follows. The first shot was in AE mode set. The second
    > was in fully automatic. Notice how soft the edges are on the fully
    > automatic shot. This is what keeps happening every time I take a
    > photo. Does anyone know what is going on, or care to suggest how to
    > resolve this?
    >
    > http://filebox.vt.edu/users/tolson/photos/IMG_2130.JPG (forgot to
    > turn down ISO from last night, a little grainy)
    >
    > http://filebox.vt.edu/users/tolson/photos/IMG_2132.JPG
    >
    > Here's a shot from the wedding that came terrible just to show you
    > what I'm so confused about.
    >
    > http://filebox.vt.edu/users/tolson/photos/IMG_2104.JPG
    >
    > Thanks for any insight, -Todd
    >
    > I'm using a canon 28-105, seen here: (not L-glass)
    > http://consumer.usa.canon.com/ir/controller?act=ModelDetailAct&fcategoryid=149&modelid=7442
    >
    >
    >
    > wedding photo
    > ------------------------------
    > File Name
    > IMG_2104.CR2
    > Camera Model
    > Canon EOS 20D
    > Shooting Date/Time
    > 9/17/2005 3:27:06 PM
    > Shooting Mode
    > Manual Exposure
    > Tv( Shutter Speed )
    > 1/80
    > Av( Aperture Value )
    > 16.0
    > Metering Mode
    > Evaluative Metering
    > ISO Speed
    > 400
    > Lens
    > 28.0 - 105.0 mm
    > Focal Length
    > 35.0 mm
    > Image Size
    > 3504x2336
    > Image Quality
    > RAW
    > Flash
    > Off
    > White Balance Mode
    > Auto
    > AF Mode
    > One-Shot AF
    > Parameters Settings
    > Contrast Mid. High
    > Sharpness Mid. High
    > Color saturation Mid. High
    > Color tone 0
    > Color Space
    > sRGB
    > Noise Reduction
    > Off
    > File Size
    > 7912 KB
    >
    >
    > manual
    > ---------------------------------------
    > File Name
    > IMG_2130.CR2
    > Camera Model
    > Canon EOS 20D
    > Shooting Date/Time
    > 9/27/2005 1:35:42 PM
    > Shooting Mode
    > Shutter-Priority AE
    > Tv( Shutter Speed )
    > 1/100
    > Av( Aperture Value )
    > 4.0
    > Metering Mode
    > Evaluative Metering
    > Exposure Compensation
    > 0
    > ISO Speed
    > 800
    > Lens
    > 28.0 - 105.0 mm
    > Focal Length
    > 65.0 mm
    > Image Size
    > 3504x2336
    > Image Quality
    > RAW
    > Flash
    > Off
    > White Balance Mode
    > Auto
    > AF Mode
    > Manual Focus
    > Parameters Settings
    > Contrast Mid. High
    > Sharpness Mid. High
    > Color saturation Mid. High
    > Color tone 0
    > Color Space
    > sRGB
    > Noise Reduction
    > Off
    > File Size
    > 7428 KB
    >
    > fully automatic
    > --------------------------------------
    > File Name
    > IMG_2132.JPG
    > Camera Model
    > Canon EOS 20D
    > Shooting Date/Time
    > 9/27/2005 1:37:55 PM
    > Shooting Mode
    > Auto
    > Tv( Shutter Speed )
    > 1/60
    > Av( Aperture Value )
    > 4.0
    > Metering Mode
    > Evaluative Metering
    > Exposure Compensation
    > 0
    > ISO Speed
    > 400
    > Lens
    > 28.0 - 105.0 mm
    > Focal Length
    > 82.0 mm
    > Image Size
    > 2544x1696
    > Image Quality
    > Fine
    > Flash
    > On
    > Flash Type
    > Built-In Flash
    > Flash Exposure Compensation
    > 0
    > Red-eye Reduction
    > Off
    > Shutter curtain sync
    > 1st-curtain sync
    > White Balance Mode
    > Auto
    > AF Mode
    > AI Focus AF
    > Parameters Settings
    > Contrast Mid. High
    > Sharpness Mid. High
    > Color saturation Mid. High
    > Color tone 0
    > Color Space
    > sRGB
    > Noise Reduction
    > Off
    > File Size
    > 1641 KB


    --
    Joseph Meehan

    Dia duit
     
    Joseph Meehan, Sep 27, 2005
    #2
    1. Advertising

  3. Dirty Harry Guest

    "Joseph Meehan" <> wrote in message
    news:_Rh_e.53514$...
    > wrote:
    > > Hello,
    > >
    > > Let me start off by saying I'm very new to photography. I bought the
    > > 20d to take to Europe in hopes of getting some large prints made.
    > > It's my first D-SLR. Ever since I bought this camera I've had trouble
    > > getting photos to come out well. I don't think I've really ever
    > > gotten a photo in a 'mode' setting to come out clear. I always have
    > > soft edges and overexposure. I tend to shoot mainly in manual mode,
    > > but sometimes still have problems. My biggest issue is getting
    > > focused clear images. If I'm just taking photos of friends around
    > > town, I typically set the camera around 1/100th (in the time-priority
    > > mode) of a second to keep from blurring the shot with my unstead
    > > hands. Sometimes this works, sometimes it doesn't. Recently I went
    > > to a wedding and did this same thing, and almost every photo I took
    > > came out blurry. Now I have taken some crisp shots, but they are
    > > almost always from far away on nice sunny days. I like to go hiking
    > > and take the camera, but the dark woods don't always make the
    > > greatest shots.

    >
    > I don't see a real problem with edge sharpness, rather I see that the
    > plane of focus is not on the same plane as the subject. In short the

    images
    > of the book are sharp where the distance from the lens to the cover is
    > within the DOF but since the cover is not exactly perpendicular to the

    axis
    > of the lens, the parts that are not sharp are further or closer than the
    > DOF. You need to try a smaller aperture.
    >
    >
    >
    > >
    > > Here are two photos I took this morning on my couch. The data from
    > > the shots follows. The first shot was in AE mode set. The second
    > > was in fully automatic. Notice how soft the edges are on the fully
    > > automatic shot. This is what keeps happening every time I take a
    > > photo. Does anyone know what is going on, or care to suggest how to
    > > resolve this?
    > >
    > > http://filebox.vt.edu/users/tolson/photos/IMG_2130.JPG (forgot to
    > > turn down ISO from last night, a little grainy)
    > >
    > > http://filebox.vt.edu/users/tolson/photos/IMG_2132.JPG
    > >
    > > Here's a shot from the wedding that came terrible just to show you
    > > what I'm so confused about.
    > >
    > > http://filebox.vt.edu/users/tolson/photos/IMG_2104.JPG
    > >
    > > Thanks for any insight, -Todd
    > >
    > > I'm using a canon 28-105, seen here: (not L-glass)
    > >

    http://consumer.usa.canon.com/ir/controller?act=ModelDetailAct&fcategoryid=1
    49&modelid=7442
    > >
    > >
    > >
    > > wedding photo
    > > ------------------------------
    > > File Name
    > > IMG_2104.CR2
    > > Camera Model
    > > Canon EOS 20D
    > > Shooting Date/Time
    > > 9/17/2005 3:27:06 PM
    > > Shooting Mode
    > > Manual Exposure
    > > Tv( Shutter Speed )
    > > 1/80
    > > Av( Aperture Value )
    > > 16.0
    > > Metering Mode
    > > Evaluative Metering
    > > ISO Speed
    > > 400
    > > Lens
    > > 28.0 - 105.0 mm
    > > Focal Length
    > > 35.0 mm
    > > Image Size
    > > 3504x2336
    > > Image Quality
    > > RAW
    > > Flash
    > > Off
    > > White Balance Mode
    > > Auto
    > > AF Mode
    > > One-Shot AF
    > > Parameters Settings
    > > Contrast Mid. High
    > > Sharpness Mid. High
    > > Color saturation Mid. High
    > > Color tone 0
    > > Color Space
    > > sRGB
    > > Noise Reduction
    > > Off
    > > File Size
    > > 7912 KB
    > >
    > >
    > > manual
    > > ---------------------------------------
    > > File Name
    > > IMG_2130.CR2
    > > Camera Model
    > > Canon EOS 20D
    > > Shooting Date/Time
    > > 9/27/2005 1:35:42 PM
    > > Shooting Mode
    > > Shutter-Priority AE
    > > Tv( Shutter Speed )
    > > 1/100
    > > Av( Aperture Value )
    > > 4.0
    > > Metering Mode
    > > Evaluative Metering
    > > Exposure Compensation
    > > 0
    > > ISO Speed
    > > 800
    > > Lens
    > > 28.0 - 105.0 mm
    > > Focal Length
    > > 65.0 mm
    > > Image Size
    > > 3504x2336
    > > Image Quality
    > > RAW
    > > Flash
    > > Off
    > > White Balance Mode
    > > Auto
    > > AF Mode
    > > Manual Focus
    > > Parameters Settings
    > > Contrast Mid. High
    > > Sharpness Mid. High
    > > Color saturation Mid. High
    > > Color tone 0
    > > Color Space
    > > sRGB
    > > Noise Reduction
    > > Off
    > > File Size
    > > 7428 KB
    > >
    > > fully automatic
    > > --------------------------------------
    > > File Name
    > > IMG_2132.JPG
    > > Camera Model
    > > Canon EOS 20D
    > > Shooting Date/Time
    > > 9/27/2005 1:37:55 PM
    > > Shooting Mode
    > > Auto
    > > Tv( Shutter Speed )
    > > 1/60
    > > Av( Aperture Value )
    > > 4.0
    > > Metering Mode
    > > Evaluative Metering
    > > Exposure Compensation
    > > 0
    > > ISO Speed
    > > 400
    > > Lens
    > > 28.0 - 105.0 mm
    > > Focal Length
    > > 82.0 mm
    > > Image Size
    > > 2544x1696
    > > Image Quality
    > > Fine
    > > Flash
    > > On
    > > Flash Type
    > > Built-In Flash
    > > Flash Exposure Compensation
    > > 0
    > > Red-eye Reduction
    > > Off
    > > Shutter curtain sync
    > > 1st-curtain sync
    > > White Balance Mode
    > > Auto
    > > AF Mode
    > > AI Focus AF
    > > Parameters Settings
    > > Contrast Mid. High
    > > Sharpness Mid. High
    > > Color saturation Mid. High
    > > Color tone 0
    > > Color Space
    > > sRGB
    > > Noise Reduction
    > > Off
    > > File Size
    > > 1641 KB

    >
    > --
    > Joseph Meehan
    >
    > Dia duit



    Yea at the range you are shooting the book, at at f4 the DOF is ultra small.
    Google: online depth of field calculator and play around with the values.
    Not sure about the wedding one, check which AF point it used with your
    software. Where focus is critical you could try justing use one AF point.
     
    Dirty Harry, Sep 27, 2005
    #3
  4. Guest

    For the wedding shot, the focus was right in the center of the bride.
    I'll have to go out this weekend and take some better shots to show
    what is happening.
     
    , Sep 27, 2005
    #4
  5. Keith Baird Guest

    wrote:
    > Here's a shot from the wedding that came terrible just to show you what
    > I'm so confused about.
    >
    > File Name: IMG_2104.CR2
    > Shooting Mode: Manual Exposure
    > Tv (Shutter Speed): 1/80
    > Av (Aperture Value): f/16.0
    > ISO Speed: 400


    This looks like a simple problem of too-slow shutter speed. The streaks
    in the upper-left of the image appears to be confetti or rice thrown by
    someone out-of-frame. An 80th of a second just seems too slow for a
    105mm lens handheld, especially considering you've got shutter speed
    potential to trade off against a small aperture & mid-range ISO.

    FWIW, try a minimum setting in either shutter- or aperture-priority
    (depending on circumstances) and be mindful of the camera's selection
    for the other setting. And maybe you should disable Safety Shift (custom
    function #16) because it can override your selected Av or Tv.

    --/<eith
     
    Keith Baird, Sep 27, 2005
    #5
  6. Alex Guest

    One of the earlier posts was a similar problem with a Canon and I have had
    exactly the same thing with my 350D and the stock 18-55 lense. The post was
    titled: Canon Rebel XT and focussing

    I use P mode mainly, and the guy who responded said that the default camera
    process starts by selecting an aperture, and then a corresponding shutter
    speed. This would certainly explain the problems I was having. I have
    since used a tripod and noticed much clearer focus, so it seems logical.

    Here's the text:

    >>> The problem is "P" mode doesn't account for depth of field and by
    >>> default the camera will use the largest aperture available unless it's a
    >>> very subject, then it will stop the lense down. In "P" mode you can make
    >>> adjustments, but the camera still does 99% of the work for you and often
    >>> gets difficult situations wrong.

    >>
    >>You can use "Program Shift," which allows you to change either the
    >>aperture
    >>or shutter speed to match your requirements. This isn't available in the
    >>"Automatic" or "green square" mode, however, only in "Program."
     
    Alex, Sep 27, 2005
    #6
  7. Dirty Harry Guest

    <> wrote in message
    news:...
    > For the wedding shot, the focus was right in the center of the bride.
    > I'll have to go out this weekend and take some better shots to show
    > what is happening.


    Well for the bride shot it could easily be motion blur. You are shooting at
    35mm which is about the same as 56mm on a 35mm. Going with the rule of
    1/over focal length says 1/80th should keep it sharp IF you were using good
    technique at the time...if you were on the move trying to capture the moment
    you might not have taken the time for a deep breath to get it sharp. I use
    the same lens and its sharper then my 17-85 ef-s is usm most of the time.
    Try it out for yourself though, set the camera to 1/80 and the same focal
    length and do a shot of something while you are panning a little, I bet it
    won't be razor sharp.
     
    Dirty Harry, Sep 27, 2005
    #7
  8. Jay Beckman Guest

    "Keith Baird" <> wrote in message
    news:...
    > wrote:
    >> Here's a shot from the wedding that came terrible just to show you what
    >> I'm so confused about.
    >>
    >> File Name: IMG_2104.CR2
    >> Shooting Mode: Manual Exposure
    >> Tv (Shutter Speed): 1/80
    >> Av (Aperture Value): f/16.0
    >> ISO Speed: 400

    >
    > This looks like a simple problem of too-slow shutter speed. The streaks
    > in the upper-left of the image appears to be confetti or rice thrown by
    > someone out-of-frame. An 80th of a second just seems too slow for a
    > 105mm lens handheld, especially considering you've got shutter speed
    > potential to trade off against a small aperture & mid-range ISO.


    Actually, I think they look like bubbles..but I agree with your assesment of
    the shutter speed issue.

    >
    > FWIW, try a minimum setting in either shutter- or aperture-priority
    > (depending on circumstances) and be mindful of the camera's selection
    > for the other setting. And maybe you should disable Safety Shift (custom
    > function #16) because it can override your selected Av or Tv.
    >
    > --/<eith
     
    Jay Beckman, Sep 28, 2005
    #8
  9. > Let me start off by saying I'm very new to photography.
    > I tend to shoot mainly in manual mode,


    Not a good combination. I would suggest letting the camera do more of
    the work until you're more able to judge what settings to use.

    The bridge image looks like it was taken on a bright, sunny day, so why
    1/80th at f16? That's far too slow. Since she, and possibly you, were
    presumably walking when you took this (note the groom's stance), you'd
    have done better to open the aperture right up and go for a much faster
    shutter.

    The dress is blown out, but you could forgive yourself for that. Tricky
    subject on a bright day. The rule is to expose for the highlights, since
    you can always push up the shadows in post processing. There's no
    information in that pure white area though. Switching to centre-weighted
    averaging exposure metering might have helped - your use of evaluative
    metering has ensured the whole scene is quite nicely exposed at the
    expense of the important bit. Or at least turn the exposure compensation
    down a bit.

    Ironically, in the manual photos you've used f4, which would have been
    ideal for the bride, but at 82mm you have a tiny depth of field - just a
    few centmetres. Your manual photo shows that rather well, but since it
    wasn't the effect you were after in this case, it's disappointing.

    > typically set the camera around 1/100th (in the time-priority mode) of
    > a second to keep from blurring the shot with my unstead hands.


    1/100th with unsteady hands? Try 1/500th. Better yet, take on one issue
    at a time. Read up on depth of field and understand what happens when
    you switch from f4 to f11. Then switch the camera to aperture priority
    mode and leave it there. This will let the camera do the shutter speed
    calculation.

    Now pick an easy scenario - outside on a bright day. Keep away from
    areas of shadow. It doesn't matter what you're shooting - the street,
    your garbage cans, plants, whatever. When you're about to take a shot,
    choose a suitable aperture for the subject, erring on the side of open
    when in doubt (to keep the shutter fast). Bump up the ISO setting if
    you're in a low light situation and the camera wants to use a shutter
    below say 1/200th. Pay attention to holding the camera still and using
    the shutter smoothly.

    Above all, persist. DSLR newbies who can't get properly exposed, well
    focused shots are very common. You just need to appreciate that it's not
    as easy as you might have thought and that it's a skill that requires a
    bit of effort and practise to learn.
     
    Derek Fountain, Sep 28, 2005
    #9
  10. Joseph Meehan wrote:
    > wrote:
    >> Hello,
    >>
    >> Let me start off by saying I'm very new to photography. I bought the
    >> 20d to take to Europe in hopes of getting some large prints made.
    >> It's my first D-SLR. Ever since I bought this camera I've had
    >> trouble getting photos to come out well. I don't think I've really
    >> ever gotten a photo in a 'mode' setting to come out clear. I always
    >> have soft edges and overexposure. I tend to shoot mainly in manual
    >> mode, but sometimes still have problems. My biggest issue is getting
    >> focused clear images. If I'm just taking photos of friends around
    >> town, I typically set the camera around 1/100th (in the time-priority
    >> mode) of a second to keep from blurring the shot with my unstead
    >> hands. Sometimes this works, sometimes it doesn't. Recently I went
    >> to a wedding and did this same thing, and almost every photo I took
    >> came out blurry. Now I have taken some crisp shots, but they are
    >> almost always from far away on nice sunny days. I like to go hiking
    >> and take the camera, but the dark woods don't always make the
    >> greatest shots.

    >
    > I don't see a real problem with edge sharpness, rather I see that
    > the plane of focus is not on the same plane as the subject. In short
    > the images of the book are sharp where the distance from the lens to
    > the cover is within the DOF but since the cover is not exactly
    > perpendicular to the axis of the lens, the parts that are not sharp
    > are further or closer than the DOF. You need to try a smaller
    > aperture.


    Let me add a couple of items.

    First the plane of focus is not usually really a plane. It is usually
    curved and usually curves towards the camera from the center so if you were
    photographing inside a sphere it would match the shape and you could have it
    focused edge to edge with most lenses.

    Second most good macro lenses (not lenses with a macro mode) have very
    flat fields of focus.

    BTW I agree with the suggestion to allow the camera to take over more of
    the work. I also have a 20D and it does a good job. This comes from a guy
    who learned photography in the 50's using all manual cameras. There is a lot
    to lean about your new camera. Keep using it a lot and you will lean a lot
    of great stuff.

    As for the wedding, they are tough and even back in the 50's a powerful
    flash was part of the standard tools for weddings. The built-in flash on
    the 20d is not very powerful and available darkness is usually not
    sufficient to easily get a well exposed subject with sufficient shutter
    speed to stop motion and small enough aperture to have enough DOF. Even
    moving up the light sensitivity will not take care of it all. Here lots of
    experience and practice helps when making the choices for each image.


    >
    >
    >
    >>
    >> Here are two photos I took this morning on my couch. The data from
    >> the shots follows. The first shot was in AE mode set. The second
    >> was in fully automatic. Notice how soft the edges are on the fully
    >> automatic shot. This is what keeps happening every time I take a
    >> photo. Does anyone know what is going on, or care to suggest how to
    >> resolve this?
    >>
    >> http://filebox.vt.edu/users/tolson/photos/IMG_2130.JPG (forgot to
    >> turn down ISO from last night, a little grainy)
    >>
    >> http://filebox.vt.edu/users/tolson/photos/IMG_2132.JPG
    >>
    >> Here's a shot from the wedding that came terrible just to show you
    >> what I'm so confused about.
    >>
    >> http://filebox.vt.edu/users/tolson/photos/IMG_2104.JPG
    >>
    >> Thanks for any insight, -Todd
    >>
    >> I'm using a canon 28-105, seen here: (not L-glass)
    >> http://consumer.usa.canon.com/ir/controller?act=ModelDetailAct&fcategoryid=149&modelid=7442
    >>
    >>
    >>
    >> wedding photo
    >> ------------------------------
    >> File Name
    >> IMG_2104.CR2
    >> Camera Model
    >> Canon EOS 20D
    >> Shooting Date/Time
    >> 9/17/2005 3:27:06 PM
    >> Shooting Mode
    >> Manual Exposure
    >> Tv( Shutter Speed )
    >> 1/80
    >> Av( Aperture Value )
    >> 16.0
    >> Metering Mode
    >> Evaluative Metering
    >> ISO Speed
    >> 400
    >> Lens
    >> 28.0 - 105.0 mm
    >> Focal Length
    >> 35.0 mm
    >> Image Size
    >> 3504x2336
    >> Image Quality
    >> RAW
    >> Flash
    >> Off
    >> White Balance Mode
    >> Auto
    >> AF Mode
    >> One-Shot AF
    >> Parameters Settings
    >> Contrast Mid. High
    >> Sharpness Mid. High
    >> Color saturation Mid. High
    >> Color tone 0
    >> Color Space
    >> sRGB
    >> Noise Reduction
    >> Off
    >> File Size
    >> 7912 KB
    >>
    >>
    >> manual
    >> ---------------------------------------
    >> File Name
    >> IMG_2130.CR2
    >> Camera Model
    >> Canon EOS 20D
    >> Shooting Date/Time
    >> 9/27/2005 1:35:42 PM
    >> Shooting Mode
    >> Shutter-Priority AE
    >> Tv( Shutter Speed )
    >> 1/100
    >> Av( Aperture Value )
    >> 4.0
    >> Metering Mode
    >> Evaluative Metering
    >> Exposure Compensation
    >> 0
    >> ISO Speed
    >> 800
    >> Lens
    >> 28.0 - 105.0 mm
    >> Focal Length
    >> 65.0 mm
    >> Image Size
    >> 3504x2336
    >> Image Quality
    >> RAW
    >> Flash
    >> Off
    >> White Balance Mode
    >> Auto
    >> AF Mode
    >> Manual Focus
    >> Parameters Settings
    >> Contrast Mid. High
    >> Sharpness Mid. High
    >> Color saturation Mid. High
    >> Color tone 0
    >> Color Space
    >> sRGB
    >> Noise Reduction
    >> Off
    >> File Size
    >> 7428 KB
    >>
    >> fully automatic
    >> --------------------------------------
    >> File Name
    >> IMG_2132.JPG
    >> Camera Model
    >> Canon EOS 20D
    >> Shooting Date/Time
    >> 9/27/2005 1:37:55 PM
    >> Shooting Mode
    >> Auto
    >> Tv( Shutter Speed )
    >> 1/60
    >> Av( Aperture Value )
    >> 4.0
    >> Metering Mode
    >> Evaluative Metering
    >> Exposure Compensation
    >> 0
    >> ISO Speed
    >> 400
    >> Lens
    >> 28.0 - 105.0 mm
    >> Focal Length
    >> 82.0 mm
    >> Image Size
    >> 2544x1696
    >> Image Quality
    >> Fine
    >> Flash
    >> On
    >> Flash Type
    >> Built-In Flash
    >> Flash Exposure Compensation
    >> 0
    >> Red-eye Reduction
    >> Off
    >> Shutter curtain sync
    >> 1st-curtain sync
    >> White Balance Mode
    >> Auto
    >> AF Mode
    >> AI Focus AF
    >> Parameters Settings
    >> Contrast Mid. High
    >> Sharpness Mid. High
    >> Color saturation Mid. High
    >> Color tone 0
    >> Color Space
    >> sRGB
    >> Noise Reduction
    >> Off
    >> File Size
    >> 1641 KB


    --
    Joseph Meehan

    Dia duit
     
    Joseph Meehan, Sep 28, 2005
    #10
  11. Keith Baird Guest

    "Keith Baird" <> wrote in message
    > This looks like a simple problem of too-slow shutter speed. The streaks
    > in the upper-left of the image appears to be confetti or rice thrown by
    > someone out-of-frame.


    "Jay Beckman" <> wrote:
    > Actually, I think they look like bubbles..but I agree with your assesment of
    > the shutter speed issue.


    Well, if the streaks are bubbles they'd be drifting much more slowly
    than thrown confetti/rice, making the degree to which the bride & groom
    are unblurred *very* admirable indeed for handheld photography.

    --/<eith
     
    Keith Baird, Sep 28, 2005
    #11
  12. Jay Beckman Guest

    "Keith Baird" <> wrote in message
    news:...
    > "Keith Baird" <> wrote in message
    >> This looks like a simple problem of too-slow shutter speed. The streaks
    >> in the upper-left of the image appears to be confetti or rice thrown by
    >> someone out-of-frame.

    >
    > "Jay Beckman" <> wrote:
    >> Actually, I think they look like bubbles..but I agree with your assesment
    >> of
    >> the shutter speed issue.

    >
    > Well, if the streaks are bubbles they'd be drifting much more slowly
    > than thrown confetti/rice, making the degree to which the bride & groom
    > are unblurred *very* admirable indeed for handheld photography.
    >
    > --/<eith


    I went back and looked again and they sure look like bubbles...probably just
    being blown (which would account for the blur) from off frame left.

    Jay B
     
    Jay Beckman, Sep 28, 2005
    #12
  13. Guest

    Hello all,

    I just wanted to thank everyone for their opinions. I know I have a
    lot to learn, but sometimes it's hard to figure out where to start. I
    really want to learn how to use all the cameras functions, but it can
    be overwhelming. I'm slowly making progress though. I really
    appreciate everyone taking a second to look at my pictures and make
    thoughtful comments.
    -Todd
     
    , Sep 28, 2005
    #13
  14. Mac Guest

    I just got my 20D back from Canon. I sent it in for "Focusing issues". It
    came back and I am experiencing the same thing.
    I have read a lot
    of posts in various places about focusing issues with the 20D. I am now
    starting to think I need to do some more experimentation.
    However; I upgraded
    from the 300D and I never missed a shot with that camera. I miss it! So
    much so, I am trying to get one on EBAY for a "back up".
    The "focus issue" with the 20D has
    frustrated me to the point where I don't take as many pictures because I
    don't feel confident in getting the shot.

    Mike

    --
    take xy and z out to reply
    --
    Michael C. McDonnell
    <> wrote in message
    news:...
    > Hello,
    >
    > Let me start off by saying I'm very new to photography. I bought the
    > 20d to take to Europe in hopes of getting some large prints made. It's
    > my first D-SLR. Ever since I bought this camera I've had trouble
    > getting photos to come out well. I don't think I've really ever gotten
    > a photo in a 'mode' setting to come out clear. I always have soft
    > edges and overexposure. I tend to shoot mainly in manual mode, but
    > sometimes still have problems. My biggest issue is getting focused
    > clear images. If I'm just taking photos of friends around town, I
    > typically set the camera around 1/100th (in the time-priority mode) of
    > a second to keep from blurring the shot with my unstead hands.
    > Sometimes this works, sometimes it doesn't. Recently I went to a
    > wedding and did this same thing, and almost every photo I took came out
    > blurry. Now I have taken some crisp shots, but they are almost always
    > from far away on nice sunny days. I like to go hiking and take the
    > camera, but the dark woods don't always make the greatest shots.
    >
    > Here are two photos I took this morning on my couch. The data from the
    > shots follows. The first shot was in AE mode set. The second was in
    > fully automatic. Notice how soft the edges are on the fully automatic
    > shot. This is what keeps happening every time I take a photo. Does
    > anyone know what is going on, or care to suggest how to resolve this?
    >
    > http://filebox.vt.edu/users/tolson/photos/IMG_2130.JPG (forgot to
    > turn down ISO from last night, a little grainy)
    >
    > http://filebox.vt.edu/users/tolson/photos/IMG_2132.JPG
    >
    > Here's a shot from the wedding that came terrible just to show you what
    > I'm so confused about.
    >
    > http://filebox.vt.edu/users/tolson/photos/IMG_2104.JPG
    >
    > Thanks for any insight, -Todd
    >
    > I'm using a canon 28-105, seen here: (not L-glass)
    > http://consumer.usa.canon.com/ir/controller?act=ModelDetailAct&fcategoryid=149&modelid=7442
    >
    >
    >
    > wedding photo
    > ------------------------------
    > File Name
    > IMG_2104.CR2
    > Camera Model
    > Canon EOS 20D
    > Shooting Date/Time
    > 9/17/2005 3:27:06 PM
    > Shooting Mode
    > Manual Exposure
    > Tv( Shutter Speed )
    > 1/80
    > Av( Aperture Value )
    > 16.0
    > Metering Mode
    > Evaluative Metering
    > ISO Speed
    > 400
    > Lens
    > 28.0 - 105.0 mm
    > Focal Length
    > 35.0 mm
    > Image Size
    > 3504x2336
    > Image Quality
    > RAW
    > Flash
    > Off
    > White Balance Mode
    > Auto
    > AF Mode
    > One-Shot AF
    > Parameters Settings
    > Contrast Mid. High
    > Sharpness Mid. High
    > Color saturation Mid. High
    > Color tone 0
    > Color Space
    > sRGB
    > Noise Reduction
    > Off
    > File Size
    > 7912 KB
    >
    >
    > manual
    > ---------------------------------------
    > File Name
    > IMG_2130.CR2
    > Camera Model
    > Canon EOS 20D
    > Shooting Date/Time
    > 9/27/2005 1:35:42 PM
    > Shooting Mode
    > Shutter-Priority AE
    > Tv( Shutter Speed )
    > 1/100
    > Av( Aperture Value )
    > 4.0
    > Metering Mode
    > Evaluative Metering
    > Exposure Compensation
    > 0
    > ISO Speed
    > 800
    > Lens
    > 28.0 - 105.0 mm
    > Focal Length
    > 65.0 mm
    > Image Size
    > 3504x2336
    > Image Quality
    > RAW
    > Flash
    > Off
    > White Balance Mode
    > Auto
    > AF Mode
    > Manual Focus
    > Parameters Settings
    > Contrast Mid. High
    > Sharpness Mid. High
    > Color saturation Mid. High
    > Color tone 0
    > Color Space
    > sRGB
    > Noise Reduction
    > Off
    > File Size
    > 7428 KB
    >
    > fully automatic
    > --------------------------------------
    > File Name
    > IMG_2132.JPG
    > Camera Model
    > Canon EOS 20D
    > Shooting Date/Time
    > 9/27/2005 1:37:55 PM
    > Shooting Mode
    > Auto
    > Tv( Shutter Speed )
    > 1/60
    > Av( Aperture Value )
    > 4.0
    > Metering Mode
    > Evaluative Metering
    > Exposure Compensation
    > 0
    > ISO Speed
    > 400
    > Lens
    > 28.0 - 105.0 mm
    > Focal Length
    > 82.0 mm
    > Image Size
    > 2544x1696
    > Image Quality
    > Fine
    > Flash
    > On
    > Flash Type
    > Built-In Flash
    > Flash Exposure Compensation
    > 0
    > Red-eye Reduction
    > Off
    > Shutter curtain sync
    > 1st-curtain sync
    > White Balance Mode
    > Auto
    > AF Mode
    > AI Focus AF
    > Parameters Settings
    > Contrast Mid. High
    > Sharpness Mid. High
    > Color saturation Mid. High
    > Color tone 0
    > Color Space
    > sRGB
    > Noise Reduction
    > Off
    > File Size
    > 1641 KB
    >
     
    Mac, Oct 2, 2005
    #14
  15. In article <>, Mac
    <> wrote:

    > I just got my 20D back from Canon. I sent it in for "Focusing issues". It
    > came back and I am experiencing the same thing.
    > I have read a lot
    > of posts in various places about focusing issues with the 20D. I am now
    > starting to think I need to do some more experimentation.
    > However; I upgraded
    > from the 300D and I never missed a shot with that camera. I miss it! So
    > much so, I am trying to get one on EBAY for a "back up".
    > The "focus issue" with the 20D has
    > frustrated me to the point where I don't take as many pictures because I
    > don't feel confident in getting the shot.


    I'm not aware of any focusing problems with any currently shipping
    Canon product. Make sure you've got all the focus points turned off
    except for one.
     
    Randall Ainsworth, Oct 2, 2005
    #15
    1. Advertising

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