Mono Pod...

Discussion in 'Digital Photography' started by Dabear, Mar 19, 2006.

  1. Dabear

    Dabear Guest

    I have been considering purchasing a mono pod to replace the heavy tripod
    that I now use on my Canon D20. In most cases, I would still use the
    tripod...but I'm finding that I'm hiking into the back country and/or
    chasing wildlife around in areas where footing is not the best and a hiking
    staff would be nice. I've seen many mono pods advertised. What works and
    what doesn't. I want it to function as a hiking staff and one that could be
    used aggressively as such...and still work well as a mono pod (or one of
    those that changes into a tripod of some sort). Price is not as much of a
    consideration as is getting the best one out there. Suggestions????

    Thanks
    Barry
    Dabear, Mar 19, 2006
    #1
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  2. Dabear <> wrote:
    : I have been considering purchasing a mono pod to replace the heavy
    : tripod that I now use on my Canon D20. In most cases, I would still
    : use the tripod...but I'm finding that I'm hiking into the back country
    : and/or chasing wildlife around in areas where footing is not the best
    : and a hiking staff would be nice. I've seen many mono pods advertised.
    : What works and what doesn't. I want it to function as a hiking staff
    : and one that could be used aggressively as such...and still work well
    : as a mono pod (or one of those that changes into a tripod of some
    : sort). Price is not as much of a consideration as is getting the best
    : one out there. Suggestions????

    Most monopods are built for strength but light weight. The strength they
    aim for is to hold a camera steady, not to support the photographer as a
    walking stick. Some of the more robust and expensive models might hold up
    to being used a hiking staff, but would probably not last very long.

    There is a solution. Look at backpacking and outdoors suppliers for a
    walking stick or staff. Some of them have a camera thread under the top
    knob. This means the walking stick that is made to take the stress of that
    use can also be used as a monopod. If you want a pan/tilt head on top you
    can get a monopod head that will screw onto the camera thread and give you
    the functions you want.

    One other thing to watch is to check the maximum and minimum extension of
    the stick (if it is an expandable model). The minimum will effect how
    useful it will be when trying to take wildlife photos crouched behind a
    short bush. And the maximum will be most useful if it allows you to stand
    fully upright with the camera eyepiece to your eye. A too short monopod
    for you can be a real pain (in the neck and back). :)

    Randy

    ==========
    Randy Berbaum
    Champaign, IL
    Randy Berbaum, Mar 19, 2006
    #2
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  3. Dabear

    Bob Salomon Guest

    In article <dvj5sn$7hj$>,
    Randy Berbaum <> wrote:

    > There is a solution. Look at backpacking and outdoors suppliers for a
    > walking stick or staff.


    The Novoflex BBSTOCK monopod is a LEKI cross country walking stick that
    can be used as a monopod or a duopod or a tripod. Can be ordered from
    any camera store. Includes carbide spike tip and removable shoe shoe as
    well as a removable hardwood top knob to attach the camera.

    --
    To reply no_ HPMarketing Corp.
    Bob Salomon, Mar 19, 2006
    #3
  4. Dabear

    ace Guest

    I have a cheap monopod, but it does the job for me, it is a sunpak
    model. When in the smallest length possible, it is about 18 inches in
    length, and as tall as me, 6 foot or a little taller.
    ace, Mar 19, 2006
    #4
  5. Dabear

    MB Guest

    I use a Profil Mono from Hama and really like it; it's made of aluminum and
    is very sturdy.

    Size: closed it's 55 cm (21.5 inches) long and 155 cm long fully extended.
    There are 4 fast-closing grabbers (?)--can't think of a better word--to lock
    extension.

    Camera attachment: the mono has a fast attachment dingy that holds a small
    plastic plate on the bottom of the camera, and a lever on the mono closes
    the connection in one motion. I have several plastic plates, one for each
    camera. A plate has a screw that fits the usual tripod mother that all
    cameras have. This method of attachment is far superior to the usual screw
    version.
    MB, Mar 19, 2006
    #5
  6. Dabear

    John Fryatt Guest

    Dabear wrote:
    <snip>
    >I want it to function as a hiking staff and one that could be
    > used aggressively as such...


    One with a good strong spike on the end would be best for spearing any
    other walkers you see when you're out. ;-)
    John Fryatt, Mar 19, 2006
    #6
  7. Dabear

    eadg Guest

    "Dabear" <> wrote in message
    news:6e8Tf.14607$...
    >I have been considering purchasing a mono pod to replace the heavy tripod
    >that I now use on my Canon D20. In most cases, I would still use the
    >tripod...but I'm finding that I'm hiking into the back country and/or
    >chasing wildlife around in areas where footing is not the best and a hiking
    >staff would be nice. I've seen many mono pods advertised. What works and
    >what doesn't. I want it to function as a hiking staff and one that could
    >be used aggressively as such...and still work well as a mono pod (or one of
    >those that changes into a tripod of some sort). Price is not as much of a
    >consideration as is getting the best one out there. Suggestions????
    >
    > Thanks
    > Barry


    Copied from a post I made earlier this week to another thread:

    >I have a Leki Sierra
    >http://www.stewardsons.co.uk/shop/product.php?xProd=779
    >Reviewed here http://photonotes.org/reviews/leki-sierra/
    >They are easily extended for use when standing, mine came in handy recently
    >on a sightseeing trip to Barcelona for some night shots of some spectacular
    >buildings.
    >I'm sure they are easy to obtain Stateside.


    --
    SR
    eadg, Mar 19, 2006
    #7
  8. Dabear

    Tundris Guest

    "Dabear" <> wrote

    > those that changes into a tripod of some sort). Price is not as much of a
    > consideration as is getting the best one out there. Suggestions????

    anybody has experience with such thing ?
    http://www.trekkingpoles.com/Trek-Tech-Trek-Pod.pro
    Tundris, Mar 19, 2006
    #8
  9. MB <> wrote:

    : Camera attachment: the mono has a fast attachment dingy that holds a small
    : plastic plate on the bottom of the camera, and a lever on the mono closes
    : the connection in one motion. I have several plastic plates, one for each
    : camera. A plate has a screw that fits the usual tripod mother that all
    : cameras have. This method of attachment is far superior to the usual screw
    : version.

    For those who are going to do a search on "plastic plate dingy" the
    correct term is "Quick Release" (QR). And I found that you can get a nice
    QR set made by Bogen (I got mine through B&H) that can retro refit a pod
    (of how ever many legs) with a QR plate. I actually have one on my tripod
    and one on my monopod so I can quickly and easily move between handheld,
    monopod and tripod with a flick of my thumb on the QR lever. Just be sure
    that you get matching QR equipment. There are many designs of QR and most
    will not work with a QR of another manufacturer. In fact my tripod and my
    monopod had built in QR plates but they don't match so I had to add the
    Bogen QR on top of the built in ones so that the camera would mount on
    both pods with matching QR on both. It may look wierd, but it works. :)

    Randy

    ==========
    Randy Berbaum
    Champaign, IL
    Randy Berbaum, Mar 20, 2006
    #9
  10. Dabear

    Kent Clarke Guest

    In article <SkeTf.105$>,
    "Tundris" <> wrote:

    > "Dabear" <> wrote
    > > those that changes into a tripod of some sort). Price is not as much of a
    > > consideration as is getting the best one out there. Suggestions????

    > anybody has experience with such thing ?
    > http://www.trekkingpoles.com/Trek-Tech-Trek-Pod.pro


    I have a TrekPod. Works pretty well. The magnetic head is convenient,
    and the pole works OK for hiking. It would be nice to have spike and ski
    basket tip options, though. The small legs do let you set it up for
    self-portraits or for holding a slave flash nearer a subject.

    This replaced a heavy old Bogen monopod with ball head.

    Monopods don't work the same way or as well as tripods for getting very
    steady shots, so don't expect magic.
    Kent Clarke, Mar 20, 2006
    #10
  11. Dabear

    Tundris Guest

    "Kent Clarke" <> wrote

    > Monopods don't work the same way or as well as tripods for getting very
    > steady shots, so don't expect magic.

    thanks. I am looking for light and steady tripod backpacking, so thought may be such trekpod would be as an option
    Tundris, Mar 21, 2006
    #11
  12. Dabear

    Kent Clarke Guest

    In article <qbWTf.2894$>,
    "Tundris" <> wrote:

    > "Kent Clarke" <> wrote
    > > Monopods don't work the same way or as well as tripods for getting very
    > > steady shots, so don't expect magic.

    > thanks. I am looking for light and steady tripod backpacking, so thought may
    > be such trekpod would be as an option


    I strap a small tripod onto my camera bag if I'm taking lots of gear,
    and will be 'fishing' for shots (hiking to a spot and setting up there
    to wait for animals to appear). If I'm 'hunting' then I take the TrekPod
    with camera attached or ready, and walk along looking for stuff to
    shoot. This is only needed for telephoto shots (400-600 mm). A beanbag
    might be another way to do it too.
    Kent Clarke, Mar 22, 2006
    #12
  13. Dabear

    Tundris Guest

    "Kent Clarke" <> wrote

    > to wait for animals to appear). If I'm 'hunting' then I take the TrekPod
    > with camera attached or ready, and walk along looking for stuff to
    > shoot. This is only needed for telephoto shots (400-600 mm). A beanbag
    > might be another way to do it too.

    thank you, I'll check this option too. I am waiting for Sigma 100-300 delivered and
    then will check how much support do I need for shooting with this lens.
    Tundris, Mar 22, 2006
    #13
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