Monitor calibration - can I approximate it this way?

Discussion in 'Digital Photography' started by Peabody, Apr 17, 2008.

  1. Peabody

    Peabody Guest

    My old CRT died, and I've picked up a used Dell 21" Trinitron, vintage
    1998. I'm having some trouble getting it to look good. In
    particular, it seems too warm at the factory default settings, both at
    6500k and 9300k.

    This monitor has individual RGB adjustments for both bias and gain,
    and I wondered if I can use something like these pictures:

    http://brighamrad.harvard.edu/research/topics/vispercep/tutorial.html

    to adjust it more or less properly to display a neutral gray. In
    playing with it, I find that I can either adjust the reds lower, or
    the greens higher, to get true gray, and the latter seems to provide
    the most pleasing outcome, particularly when I have contrast turned
    down as I often do for text work.

    Is there a proper way to adjust the bias and gain settings? In other
    words, it looks like I could achieve a true gray with all six settings
    set at relatively low levels, or at relatively high levels. Does it
    matter which I choose?
    Peabody, Apr 17, 2008
    #1
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  2. In article <T0NNj.106107$>,
    Peabody <> wrote:

    > My old CRT died, and I've picked up a used Dell 21" Trinitron, vintage
    > 1998. I'm having some trouble getting it to look good. In
    > particular, it seems too warm at the factory default settings, both at
    > 6500k and 9300k.
    >
    > This monitor has individual RGB adjustments for both bias and gain,
    > and I wondered if I can use something like these pictures:
    >
    > http://brighamrad.harvard.edu/research/topics/vispercep/tutorial.html
    >
    > to adjust it more or less properly to display a neutral gray. In
    > playing with it, I find that I can either adjust the reds lower, or
    > the greens higher, to get true gray, and the latter seems to provide
    > the most pleasing outcome, particularly when I have contrast turned
    > down as I often do for text work.
    >
    > Is there a proper way to adjust the bias and gain settings? In other
    > words, it looks like I could achieve a true gray with all six settings
    > set at relatively low levels, or at relatively high levels. Does it
    > matter which I choose?


    There are three settings per channel - black point, midpoint, and white
    point. All are critical for getting the color temperature exactly
    right. Usually these are easily accessible on the analog board on the
    back of the tube or on the side of the main board. Parts on the analog
    board float around 900V so use a plastic screwdriver. Analog
    adjustments on the main board are usually referenced to ground. The
    flyback transformer shield may have line AC.

    Tubes also have that clusterfuck of beam alignment magnets on them for
    color purity and geometry. If you're lucky, the only adjustment is
    gluing geometry magnets back on when they fall off. Don't even think
    about touching the rotating magnets unless you have the service manual
    to tell you the adjustment procedure.

    And most importantly if you open up the case, watch out for
    electrostatic discharges coming off the red anode wire. The reflex
    muscle jerk can cut your hand on a sharp object or, worst of all, cause
    you to accidentally break the tube.


    I'm glad CRTs are obsolete!

    --
    Block Google's spam and enjoy Usenet again.
    Reply with Google and I won't hear from you.
    Kevin McMurtrie, Apr 18, 2008
    #2
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  3. Peabody

    Paul Furman Guest

    Peabody wrote:
    > My old CRT died, and I've picked up a used Dell 21" Trinitron, vintage
    > 1998.


    I have a Sony Trinitron Multiscan G500 of about the same age. It has
    developed a case of epilepsy and looks awfully low contrast compared to
    my new laptop screen which runs as a dual monitor side by side with it.

    > I'm having some trouble getting it to look good. In
    > particular, it seems too warm at the factory default settings, both at
    > 6500k and 9300k.
    >
    > This monitor has individual RGB adjustments for both bias and gain,


    I follow the procedure with Photoshop's 'Adobe Gamma' thingy in the
    control panel which as I recall starts with maxing out contrast and
    adjusting brightness on the monitor's menu button then I thought the
    rest was done through the applet thingy including white balance and
    gamma (midpoint brightness).

    > and I wondered if I can use something like these pictures:
    >
    > http://brighamrad.harvard.edu/research/topics/vispercep/tutorial.html
    >
    > to adjust it more or less properly to display a neutral gray. In
    > playing with it, I find that I can either adjust the reds lower, or
    > the greens higher, to get true gray, and the latter seems to provide
    > the most pleasing outcome, particularly when I have contrast turned
    > down as I often do for text work.
    >
    > Is there a proper way to adjust the bias and gain settings? In other
    > words, it looks like I could achieve a true gray with all six settings
    > set at relatively low levels, or at relatively high levels. Does it
    > matter which I choose?
    >
    >
    Paul Furman, Apr 20, 2008
    #3
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