Moire in the D70S

Discussion in 'Digital Photography' started by kombi45@yahoo.com, Jun 7, 2005.

  1. Guest

    Upon researching the D70S, moire-ing has come up on more than a couple
    of boards. Under what conditions/scenarios might I see (significant)
    moire on RAW files, JPEG files? I understand the concept - when the
    image is of a higher resolution than the camera's sensor - which is 6.1
    MP. But can someone give examples of this?

    On dpreview.com they have an example of a picture taken by two cameras
    of varying resolution (of a particularly innocuous/common city-scene),
    one with moire one w/o. Only thing is, they don't mention which
    cameras they are or the resolution. Anyway, yet another monkey wrench
    thrown into my buying decision.

    Regards,

    Ben
    , Jun 7, 2005
    #1
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  2. JohnR66 Guest

    <> wrote in message
    news:...
    > Upon researching the D70S, moire-ing has come up on more than a couple
    > of boards. Under what conditions/scenarios might I see (significant)
    > moire on RAW files, JPEG files? I understand the concept - when the
    > image is of a higher resolution than the camera's sensor - which is 6.1
    > MP. But can someone give examples of this?
    >
    > On dpreview.com they have an example of a picture taken by two cameras
    > of varying resolution (of a particularly innocuous/common city-scene),
    > one with moire one w/o. Only thing is, they don't mention which
    > cameras they are or the resolution. Anyway, yet another monkey wrench
    > thrown into my buying decision.
    >
    > Regards,
    >
    > Ben
    >

    As I've heard, Nikon chose a *weaker* anti-aliasing filter over the CCD in
    favor of sharper images with less software sharpening artifacts but at the
    cost of color moire patterns in some images where there is repeating
    patterns at around the same frequency as the sensor cells on the CCD. It is
    very rare that this is ever an issue. My compact camera does this as well om
    my moire testing chart, but I rarely see it in normal shooting.

    If this is a problem for you, the new Rebel XT and 20D produce sharp images,
    with very low sharpening halos and very low moire effects. IMO, they are at
    the top of the image quality heap for the 6-8mp camera crowd.
    John
    JohnR66, Jun 7, 2005
    #2
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  3. bmoag Guest

    Monocolored, medium hued areas with fine texture patterns will frequently
    yield moire with the D70.
    For example I have 3 small parrots. Many picture sthat are close enough to
    show the texture in a large area of grey feathers shows moire to varying
    degrees. Although I have not analyzed it I would presume that the angle
    light comes off the subject is a factor.
    Not all moire that is seen in an enlarged section of an image on a computer
    monitor will be visible in the final print.
    However there are times when it is definitely an issue.
    bmoag, Jun 7, 2005
    #3
  4. Frederick Guest

    bmoag wrote:

    > Monocolored, medium hued areas with fine texture patterns will frequently
    > yield moire with the D70.
    > For example I have 3 small parrots. Many picture sthat are close enough to
    > show the texture in a large area of grey feathers shows moire to varying
    > degrees. Although I have not analyzed it I would presume that the angle
    > light comes off the subject is a factor.
    > Not all moire that is seen in an enlarged section of an image on a computer
    > monitor will be visible in the final print.
    > However there are times when it is definitely an issue.
    >
    >

    "Frequently" has not been my experience.
    The only time it caused me a minor problem, I didn't notice it on the
    monitor, but did on the print at A4 size. Subject was a very contrasty
    beach shot into the light, with a pattern of regular, repeating, and
    receding small wave patterns in the sand. The print showed a coloured
    band in one small area. Easily fixed in this case by selecting the area
    and desaturating it. I expect to see it again, but unless the photo had
    large areas of regular repeating patterns, I don't expect that it would
    be any harder to fix than above.
    Frederick, Jun 7, 2005
    #4
  5. Guest

    bmoag wrote:
    > Monocolored, medium hued areas with fine texture patterns will frequently
    > yield moire with the D70.
    > For example I have 3 small parrots. Many picture sthat are close enough to
    > show the texture in a large area of grey feathers shows moire to varying
    > degrees. Although I have not analyzed it I would presume that the angle
    > light comes off the subject is a factor.
    > Not all moire that is seen in an enlarged section of an image on a computer
    > monitor will be visible in the final print.
    > However there are times when it is definitely an issue.


    Does this translate to more moire (uggggggh) in macro photography with
    the D70S?

    Anyway, after I posted this I came across a compare/contrast article on
    the Canon D20 and the Nikon D70S. The author posits that the 2MP
    difference between the two is less than marginal and not worthy of the
    hype. The real difference is in the anti-aliasing ability of the D20 -
    thus less moire (again, uggggggh), the 3200 ISO capability of the D20
    and the more than twice the FPS capability of the D20. The D70 gets
    the nod in other areas, in particular ease of use in high light
    situations, WB manipulation on the fly, flash sync modes, JPEG
    sizing/quality options should you choose to shoot that way, etc.

    The Canon gets the nod in low-light, rapid fire situations, such as
    sporting events. Also, in terms of "fabric photography" where high
    resolution patterns might tend to trip up the Nikon, Canon is rated
    better. I won't be doing any such work...for now, anyway.

    With all of that in mind, the fact that I already have a couple of
    Nikon lenses, and the fact that the D20 camera body only is almost 50%
    more expensive than the Nikon, I am going with the D70S. I am still
    interested in hearing more on the subject, however.

    Regards,

    Ben
    , Jun 7, 2005
    #5
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