Mirror lockup - WTF?

Discussion in 'Digital Photography' started by Derek Fountain, Mar 10, 2005.

  1. What is mirror lockup and why would I want it?

    --
    The email address used to post is a spam pit. Contact me at
    http://www.derekfountain.org : <a
    href="http://www.derekfountain.org/">Derek Fountain</a>
    Derek Fountain, Mar 10, 2005
    #1
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  2. Derek Fountain

    werdan Guest

    When you take a shot with a SLR, the mirror swings out the way automagically
    before the shutter is released.

    The "mirror lock up" swings the mirror up before you press the shutter
    release button, the idea being to reduce vibrations. Handy for such things
    as astrophotography etc.

    "Derek Fountain" <> wrote in message
    news:422fedb5$0$22830$...
    > What is mirror lockup and why would I want it?
    >
    > --
    > The email address used to post is a spam pit. Contact me at
    > http://www.derekfountain.org : <a
    > href="http://www.derekfountain.org/">Derek Fountain</a>
    werdan, Mar 10, 2005
    #2
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  3. "Derek Fountain" <> wrote:

    > What is mirror lockup and why would I want it?


    A trick that locks the mirror out of position before you take a photograph
    so that the force of moving the mirror and the mirror coming to a stop don't
    shake the camera.

    If you wanted to take sharp images on a tripod with shutter speeds in the
    range from a 1/30 to a few seconds, you'd (probably) get sharper images if
    you had and used this feature.

    David J. Littleboy
    Tokyo, Japan
    David J. Littleboy, Mar 10, 2005
    #3
  4. Derek Fountain <> wrote:
    : What is mirror lockup and why would I want it?

    Two uses. First locking the mirror up gives access to the shutter and
    sensor area for cleaning. Second in some situations the vibration imparted
    by the physical movement of the mirror at shutter release can cause
    blurring (extreme closeup, etc.). In a situation like this you would set
    the camera, focus and such and then lock the mirror up before snapping the
    photo.

    But as I said these situations that require a mirror lock up are rare and
    many people do not have a use for the function. If you don't need it,
    don't use it. :)

    Randy

    ==========
    Randy Berbaum
    Champaign, IL
    Randy Berbaum, Mar 10, 2005
    #4
  5. Derek Fountain

    JohnJ Guest


    > But as I said these situations that require a mirror lock up are rare and
    > many people do not have a use for the function.


    Rare, I use it for approx half of my work every day...
    JJ
    JohnJ, Mar 10, 2005
    #5
  6. Derek Fountain

    Pete D Guest

    Also swings up after you press the shutter release and then has a delay
    before the shutter releases, it reduces vibrations and is good when taking
    shots in low light. Scumbag cameras like the Nikon D70 and the Canon 300D do
    not have it. ;-)


    "werdan" <> wrote in message
    news:_cSXd.191580$...
    >
    > When you take a shot with a SLR, the mirror swings out the way
    > automagically before the shutter is released.
    >
    > The "mirror lock up" swings the mirror up before you press the shutter
    > release button, the idea being to reduce vibrations. Handy for such things
    > as astrophotography etc.
    >
    > "Derek Fountain" <> wrote in message
    > news:422fedb5$0$22830$...
    >> What is mirror lockup and why would I want it?
    >>
    >> --
    >> The email address used to post is a spam pit. Contact me at
    >> http://www.derekfountain.org : <a
    >> href="http://www.derekfountain.org/">Derek Fountain</a>

    >
    >
    Pete D, Mar 10, 2005
    #6
  7. Derek Fountain

    Pete D Guest

    "JohnJ" <> wrote in message
    news:422ff324$0$22219$...
    >
    >> But as I said these situations that require a mirror lock up are rare and
    >> many people do not have a use for the function.

    >
    > Rare, I use it for approx half of my work every day...
    > JJ


    I bet his camera does not have therefore he doesn't need it (D70 or 300D
    perhaps, LOL).
    Pete D, Mar 10, 2005
    #7
  8. Derek Fountain

    werdan Guest

    "Pete D" <> wrote in message
    news:yGTXd.191705$...
    > Also swings up after you press the shutter release and then has a delay
    > before the shutter releases, it reduces vibrations and is good when taking
    > shots in low light. Scumbag cameras like the Nikon D70 and the Canon 300D
    > do not have it. ;-)
    >
    >


    Actually, that's what mine does on the 2sec timer, now that you've mentioned
    it. lol.
    werdan, Mar 10, 2005
    #8
  9. Derek Fountain

    Lisa Horton Guest

    Derek Fountain wrote:
    >
    > What is mirror lockup and why would I want it?
    >
    >


    To prevent your mirror from being stolen?

    The others have answered your question correctly, and seriously :)

    Lisa
    Lisa Horton, Mar 10, 2005
    #9
  10. Derek Fountain

    Marli Guest

    Scumbag cameras??? Are they like Scumbag people who are ignorant, and try to
    puff them selves up to try to be somebody??



    "Pete D" <> wrote in message
    news:yGTXd.191705$...
    > Also swings up after you press the shutter release and then has a delay
    > before the shutter releases, it reduces vibrations and is good when taking
    > shots in low light. Scumbag cameras like the Nikon D70 and the Canon 300D
    > do not have it. ;-)
    >
    >
    > "werdan" <> wrote in message
    > news:_cSXd.191580$...
    >>
    >> When you take a shot with a SLR, the mirror swings out the way
    >> automagically before the shutter is released.
    >>
    >> The "mirror lock up" swings the mirror up before you press the shutter
    >> release button, the idea being to reduce vibrations. Handy for such
    >> things as astrophotography etc.
    >>
    >> "Derek Fountain" <> wrote in message
    >> news:422fedb5$0$22830$...
    >>> What is mirror lockup and why would I want it?
    >>>
    >>> --
    >>> The email address used to post is a spam pit. Contact me at
    >>> http://www.derekfountain.org : <a
    >>> href="http://www.derekfountain.org/">Derek Fountain</a>

    >>
    >>

    >
    >
    Marli, Mar 10, 2005
    #10
  11. Derek Fountain

    BG250 Guest

    Another purpose for MLU, back in the olden days of film, was some very short
    focal length lenses had the rear lens elements projecting into the mirror
    box and into the path of the swinging mirror. The mirror could be *locked
    up* before attaching the lens. I think it was some fisheye lenses for Nikon.
    I couldn't use them on my FM2n because it didn't do MLU. Don't know about
    other systems.
    John

    "Derek Fountain" <> wrote in message
    news:422fedb5$0$22830$...
    > What is mirror lockup and why would I want it?
    >
    > --
    > The email address used to post is a spam pit. Contact me at
    > http://www.derekfountain.org : <a
    > href="http://www.derekfountain.org/">Derek Fountain</a>
    BG250, Mar 10, 2005
    #11
  12. Derek Fountain wrote:

    > What is mirror lockup and why would I want it?
    >

    In camera with a large moving mirror, such as an SLR, the mirror slams
    out of the exposure path when the shutter button is tripped. This
    causes some shake in camera. Shake produces a form of motion blur that
    degrades resolution. If you want the absolute highest resolution, then
    raise (lock up) the mirror before exposure. This mainly refers to using
    a tripod. I suspect normal hand motion would mask the vibration from
    the mirror motion if you are not using a tripod. But with tripod work
    with an SLR, using the mirror lockup feature is quite common.
    Don Stauffer in Minneapolis, Mar 10, 2005
    #12
  13. "JohnJ" <> writes:

    >> But as I said these situations that require a mirror lock up are rare and
    >> many people do not have a use for the function.

    >
    > Rare, I use it for approx half of my work every day...


    Okay, but I'll be you're not doing racetracks, wedding candids, sports
    photography, or any of a number of other areas.

    I've never owned a camera that supported it, until I picked up an old
    Nikon F for nostaligic reasons a few years back. Though I've had
    cameras with a fixed mirror (TLR) or no mirror (4x5). I *wish* I'd
    had it at various times.
    --
    David Dyer-Bennet, <mailto:>, <http://www.dd-b.net/dd-b/>
    RKBA: <http://noguns-nomoney.com/> <http://www.dd-b.net/carry/>
    Pics: <http://dd-b.lighthunters.net/> <http://www.dd-b.net/dd-b/SnapshotAlbum/>
    Dragaera/Steven Brust: <http://dragaera.info/>
    David Dyer-Bennet, Mar 10, 2005
    #13
  14. Derek Fountain

    Ron Hunter Guest

    Marli wrote:
    > Scumbag cameras??? Are they like Scumbag people who are ignorant, and try to
    > puff them selves up to try to be somebody??
    >
    >
    >


    Some people lack self-confidence to the point that the only way they can
    compensate is to say derogative things to, or about, others, or their
    choices. It's sad.


    --
    Ron Hunter
    Ron Hunter, Mar 10, 2005
    #14
  15. Derek Fountain

    Ron Hunter Guest

    Randy Berbaum wrote:
    > Derek Fountain <> wrote:
    > : What is mirror lockup and why would I want it?
    >
    > Two uses. First locking the mirror up gives access to the shutter and
    > sensor area for cleaning. Second in some situations the vibration imparted
    > by the physical movement of the mirror at shutter release can cause
    > blurring (extreme closeup, etc.). In a situation like this you would set
    > the camera, focus and such and then lock the mirror up before snapping the
    > photo.
    >
    > But as I said these situations that require a mirror lock up are rare and
    > many people do not have a use for the function. If you don't need it,
    > don't use it. :)
    >
    > Randy
    >
    > ==========
    > Randy Berbaum
    > Champaign, IL
    >


    And if you are pretty sure you will not need it, don't pay extra money
    to get a camera with the feature.


    --
    Ron Hunter
    Ron Hunter, Mar 10, 2005
    #15
  16. Derek Fountain

    Ron Hunter Guest

    JohnJ wrote:
    >>But as I said these situations that require a mirror lock up are rare and
    >>many people do not have a use for the function.

    >
    >
    > Rare, I use it for approx half of my work every day...
    > JJ
    >
    >

    And how many other people do you think never use it at all? Different
    people, different needs.


    --
    Ron Hunter
    Ron Hunter, Mar 10, 2005
    #16
  17. Derek Fountain

    Ron Hunter Guest

    Pete D wrote:
    > "JohnJ" <> wrote in message
    > news:422ff324$0$22219$...
    >
    >>>But as I said these situations that require a mirror lock up are rare and
    >>>many people do not have a use for the function.

    >>
    >>Rare, I use it for approx half of my work every day...
    >>JJ

    >
    >
    > I bet his camera does not have therefore he doesn't need it (D70 or 300D
    > perhaps, LOL).
    >
    >

    Someone should go out and pay extra money for a feature they don't need
    just to appease your opinion? Perhaps you would be willing to subsidize
    my next camera purchase so I can get a few extra features I really don't
    need...


    --
    Ron Hunter
    Ron Hunter, Mar 10, 2005
    #17
  18. Derek Fountain

    Ron Hunter Guest

    David Dyer-Bennet wrote:
    > "JohnJ" <> writes:
    >
    >
    >>>But as I said these situations that require a mirror lock up are rare and
    >>>many people do not have a use for the function.

    >>
    >>Rare, I use it for approx half of my work every day...

    >
    >
    > Okay, but I'll be you're not doing racetracks, wedding candids, sports
    > photography, or any of a number of other areas.
    >
    > I've never owned a camera that supported it, until I picked up an old
    > Nikon F for nostaligic reasons a few years back. Though I've had
    > cameras with a fixed mirror (TLR) or no mirror (4x5). I *wish* I'd
    > had it at various times.


    There is, of course, the other option. NO mirror, no shake. Grin.


    --
    Ron Hunter
    Ron Hunter, Mar 10, 2005
    #18
  19. > "Pete D" <> wrote in message
    > news:yGTXd.191705$...
    > > Also swings up after you press the shutter release and then has a delay
    > > before the shutter releases, it reduces vibrations and is good when

    taking
    > > shots in low light. Scumbag cameras like the Nikon D70 and the Canon

    300D
    > > do not have it. ;-)


    "Marli" <> wrote in message news:...
    > Scumbag cameras??? Are they like Scumbag people who are ignorant, and try

    to
    > puff them selves up to try to be somebody??


    Didn't you see his ;-) ? Sarcasm doesn't work on Usenet.

    Anyway, there is a firmware hack for the Canon EOS-300D that adds mirror
    lock-up, see: http://satinfo.narod.ru/en/index.html. Canon included it as
    standard on the EOS-350D, so you can be sure that Nikon will include it on
    the successor to the D70, which is rumored to be released very soon.

    It's an extremely useful feature that should not be compromised on. There
    are a lot of features that the amateur may not understand at the time of
    purchase, that he or she will greatly regret not having in the future.

    The table on http://digitalslrinfo.com/ includes the presence of absence of
    mirror lock-up. Very few cameras don't have it, since it needs to be there
    for sensor cleaning anyway. It's usually just a firmware issue.

    Digital SLRs without Mirror Lock-Up
    --------------------------------------
    Canon EOS-300D (use hack)
    Nikon D70
    Fuji S2 Pro
    Olympus Evolt E300


    Steve
    http://digitalslrinfo.com/
    The Official Digital SLR Information Site of the Internet (TM)*

    * This is a parody on Pentax
    Steven M. Scharf, Mar 10, 2005
    #19
  20. "Randy Berbaum" <> wrote in message
    news:d0orgf$ouc$...

    > But as I said these situations that require a mirror lock up are rare and
    > many people do not have a use for the function. If you don't need it,
    > don't use it. :)


    Not as rare as you imply.

    Beware of advice that goes something like this, "you don't need feature XYZ
    because I never use it." The amateur may not even know what the feature is
    at the time of purchase, but may regret not having it as they become more
    experienced.
    Steven M. Scharf, Mar 10, 2005
    #20
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