MiniDV to DVD-R

Discussion in 'Computer Support' started by ºoºfizzyºoº, Aug 1, 2004.

  1. Is it possible (via a DVD burner and some sort of software) to transfer
    digital images from a camcorders miniDV cassette to a DVD-R and retain that
    excellent digital picture. At the moment, all of my home movies are copied
    across to video tape which I'm worried will degenerate over the years.
    Also... I'm assuming if this is possible i'd have to copy the contents of
    the miniDV cassette to the hard drive first. How much hard drive space would
    I need for a 60 minute cassette? I know it's going to multiple GBs)
    ºoºfizzyºoº, Aug 1, 2004
    #1
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  2. ºoºfizzyºoº wrote:
    > Is it possible (via a DVD burner and some sort of software) to
    > transfer digital images from a camcorders miniDV cassette to a DVD-R
    > and retain that excellent digital picture. At the moment, all of my
    > home movies are copied across to video tape which I'm worried will
    > degenerate over the years.


    DV-tape has an expected data storage lifespan of 7 years, maximum.

    > Also... I'm assuming if this is possible
    > i'd have to copy the contents of the miniDV cassette to the hard
    > drive first.


    No. If you have the right software, and the right camera, winDVR or Arcsoft
    ShowBiz for example, you can capture only the bits, snippets and scenes that
    you really want. If your camera has a firewire interface, you should be able
    to control the device from your PC. I do it with my JVC camera. Arcsoft
    ShowBiz is worth the money... capture, edit, transform and burn DVDs. winDVR
    is very handy to have... good capture control and supports DVI display
    adaptors and TV cards.

    > How much hard drive space would I need for a 60 minute
    > cassette? I know it's going to multiple GBs)


    It depends on the quality of the image you want. If you extract and compress
    at about 320 x 240 pixels, not too much space is required, but if you go to
    DVD quality at 720 x 576 pixels (PAL) (720 x 480 for NTSC) with raw AVI
    format, which is what you should do, then convert to MPEG-2 DVD quality for
    burning to optical disc, you will need lots of gigabytes. I have 600GB plus.
    I have more, but can't think of the number at this moment.

    I just finished a scene that was 4 minutes and 30 seconds in length at 720 x
    576 pixel MPEG-2; it consumes 220MB. I have another scene in raw AVI format
    (at the same resolution) that lasts only 48 seconds but consumes 604MB.

    You need to consider capturing to disk in raw AVI and going for big disk
    space requirements because raw AVI will give you a lot of conversion
    flexibility and you can control the final output quality. The point is, the
    more compression you have at the source, the lower the quality at the
    destination when you try to edit the images and produce output. That is
    especially a problem if you have codec issues. If you have a dodgy codec,
    the image can, and does often, resize and squish. If your source files are
    encoded with a codec, it can take hours of work to fix the mess and the fix
    can cost you a lot of output quality.

    So, here is how I do it...

    A) Record on DV tape

    B) Capture scenes on PC to raw AVI, trimming as I go.

    C) Archive the tape in a safe, dark place or reuse it.

    D) Produce DVD quality MPEG from the raw AVI.

    E) Burn two DVDs. One for archiving with the tape in C)
    and the other for watching.

    F) Delete the MPEGs from disk (they can be recreated)

    G) Archive the raw AVI to DVD, but only if it contains
    precious scenes that can't be replaced, for example,
    shots of my penis when I had one.
    Kinag the Menace-beater, Aug 1, 2004
    #2
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  3. ºoºfizzyºoº

    Trev Guest

    "ºoºfizzyºoº" <> wrote in message
    news:cei79p$bk7$...
    > Is it possible (via a DVD burner and some sort of software) to transfer
    > digital images from a camcorders miniDV cassette to a DVD-R and retain

    that
    > excellent digital picture. At the moment, all of my home movies are copied
    > across to video tape which I'm worried will degenerate over the years.
    > Also... I'm assuming if this is possible i'd have to copy the contents of
    > the miniDV cassette to the hard drive first. How much hard drive space

    would
    > I need for a 60 minute cassette? I know it's going to multiple GBs)
    >
    >
    >
    >

    You will need a firewire card and some software XP has windows movie maker
    built in . This will also allow you to cut bits out and cleanup before the
    burning to disc.
    You want around 30 gb free space to capture encode and burn and really NTFS
    formatted . Encoding is dependent on cpu speed. It will take more then 60
    mins. of 100% usage for a 60 min. video (my old P11 would take all night for
    10 mins. ).

    Alternatively Buy a DVD recorder which you use the same way as the VCR. I
    understand that Woollies have a reliable low cost one available
    Trev, Aug 1, 2004
    #3
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