Military funerals.

Discussion in 'Computer Support' started by Aardvark, Nov 12, 2009.

  1. Aardvark

    Aardvark Guest

    Do any of the readers of this group know the name for the following
    position sometimes assumed by a guard of honour at a military funeral?:

    Head bowed, rifle butt upwards with hands resting on butt, barrel resting
    on toe of boot.

    I was told its name (once) many years ago, but had forgotten minutes later.

    I'm searching for a specific photograph of a soldier in this position. The
    soldier must be in XIV army (WWII SEAC) jungle fatigues, complete with
    slouch hat and Enfield No.4 rifle and preferably facing three-quarters
    away from the camera ie the view of the observer being over one shoulder
    or the other but with the face in profile.



    --
    Elmo McElroy: If I wanted cuisine, I'd have gone to Paris
    Felix DeSouza: You can still go to France. It's full of pricks. They hate
    Yanks too. Do you fancy a bite, or what?
    Elmo Mc Elroy: Yeah, all right.
     
    Aardvark, Nov 12, 2009
    #1
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  2. Aardvark

    Oldus Fartus Guest

    Aardvark wrote:
    > Do any of the readers of this group know the name for the following
    > position sometimes assumed by a guard of honour at a military funeral?:
    >
    > Head bowed, rifle butt upwards with hands resting on butt, barrel resting
    > on toe of boot.
    >
    > I was told its name (once) many years ago, but had forgotten minutes later.
    >
    > I'm searching for a specific photograph of a soldier in this position. The
    > soldier must be in XIV army (WWII SEAC) jungle fatigues, complete with
    > slouch hat and Enfield No.4 rifle and preferably facing three-quarters
    > away from the camera ie the view of the observer being over one shoulder
    > or the other but with the face in profile.
    >
    >
    >


    Yes, it is called "Rest on Arms Reversed"

    --
    Cheers
    Oldus Fartus
     
    Oldus Fartus, Nov 12, 2009
    #2
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  3. Aardvark

    Aardvark Guest

    On Thu, 12 Nov 2009 23:37:24 +0800, Oldus Fartus wrote:

    > Aardvark wrote:
    >> Do any of the readers of this group know the name for the following
    >> position sometimes assumed by a guard of honour at a military funeral?:
    >>
    >> Head bowed, rifle butt upwards with hands resting on butt, barrel
    >> resting on toe of boot.
    >>
    >> I was told its name (once) many years ago, but had forgotten minutes
    >> later.
    >>
    >> I'm searching for a specific photograph of a soldier in this position.
    >> The soldier must be in XIV army (WWII SEAC) jungle fatigues, complete
    >> with slouch hat and Enfield No.4 rifle and preferably facing
    >> three-quarters away from the camera ie the view of the observer being
    >> over one shoulder or the other but with the face in profile.
    >>
    >>
    >>
    >>

    > Yes, it is called "Rest on Arms Reversed"


    Thanks for that, mate. I'll work on that assumption, although it doesn't
    ring any bells.

    I've got a feeling the name of the position would be similar in both
    British and ANZAC forces, possibly Canadian too. There's no guessing what
    US forces would call it.

    Am I correct in assuming you're an Aussie? If so do you have any family
    connections with anyone who served in Burma under General Slim?



    --
    Elmo McElroy: If I wanted cuisine, I'd have gone to Paris
    Felix DeSouza: You can still go to France. It's full of pricks. They hate
    Yanks too. Do you fancy a bite, or what?
    Elmo Mc Elroy: Yeah, all right.
     
    Aardvark, Nov 12, 2009
    #3
  4. Aardvark

    Aardvark Guest

    On Thu, 12 Nov 2009 17:31:25 +0000, ~BD~ wrote:

    > Aardvark wrote:
    >
    >>> Yes, it is called "Rest on Arms Reversed"

    >>
    >> Thanks for that, mate. I'll work on that assumption, although it
    >> doesn't ring any bells.
    >>
    >> I've got a feeling the name of the position would be similar in both
    >> British and ANZAC forces, possibly Canadian too. There's no guessing
    >> what US forces would call it.
    >>
    >> Am I correct in assuming you're an Aussie? If so do you have any family
    >> connections with anyone who served in Burma under General Slim?
    >>
    >>

    > You should *never* assume - CHECK!
    >


    I did. I used his headers.

    > The Aussies never did do what we told them! ;)
    >


    The poor buggers did at Suvla Bay and Gallipoli.

    > You might have noticed that that Old Fart took part in a RIMPAC exercise
    > and lived in Canberra IIRC so there is a fair chance that he *is* from
    > 'down under'!
    >


    I remember someone saying that, but don't expect me to remember who. I've
    slept since then.

    > What you might be looking to 'remember' is what is stated here:
    >
    > "A few feet from the marker, the Kings Own halted and then performed
    > Mourn Arms. The musket is brought to Present Arms and then Mourn Arms is
    > called. The musket is raised high and the muzzle is lowered slowly to
    > point straight down. Hands are wrapped on the butt with elbows held
    > high. Next, the elbows are lowered to the side, and then the head is
    > lowered to the musket butt."
    >
    > Ref: http://www.kingsown.net/gall_horne.htm
    >
    > HTH



    Thanks, it does. There's also a Mourn Arms on the march (slow march at
    funerals) where one's weapon is tucked under the left arm with the butt
    facing forward and up, muzzle rearward and down, with the barrel supported
    by the right hand behind the back. I wonder how that's done with the SA80.

    Now if only I can get a SEAC photo like the one I described I'd be happy.


    --
    Elmo McElroy: If I wanted cuisine, I'd have gone to Paris
    Felix DeSouza: You can still go to France. It's full of pricks. They hate
    Yanks too. Do you fancy a bite, or what?
    Elmo Mc Elroy: Yeah, all right.
     
    Aardvark, Nov 12, 2009
    #4
  5. Aardvark

    Aardvark Guest

    On Thu, 12 Nov 2009 11:18:22 -0600, Lookout wrote:

    > On Thu, 12 Nov 2009 23:37:24 +0800, Oldus Fartus
    > <> wrote:
    >
    >>Aardvark wrote:
    >>> Do any of the readers of this group know the name for the following
    >>> position sometimes assumed by a guard of honour at a military
    >>> funeral?:
    >>>
    >>> Head bowed, rifle butt upwards with hands resting on butt, barrel
    >>> resting on toe of boot.
    >>>
    >>> I was told its name (once) many years ago, but had forgotten minutes
    >>> later.
    >>>
    >>> I'm searching for a specific photograph of a soldier in this position.
    >>> The soldier must be in XIV army (WWII SEAC) jungle fatigues, complete
    >>> with slouch hat and Enfield No.4 rifle and preferably facing
    >>> three-quarters away from the camera ie the view of the observer being
    >>> over one shoulder or the other but with the face in profile.
    >>>
    >>>
    >>>
    >>>

    >>Yes, it is called "Rest on Arms Reversed"

    >
    > I was on funeral detail for several months at 2 posts and I never saw
    > that. It must be foreign.


    If you see any pics of Reagan or JFK lying in State I think you might find
    the servicemen around the coffin in the drill position I described.



    --
    Elmo McElroy: If I wanted cuisine, I'd have gone to Paris
    Felix DeSouza: You can still go to France. It's full of pricks. They hate
    Yanks too. Do you fancy a bite, or what?
    Elmo Mc Elroy: Yeah, all right.
     
    Aardvark, Nov 12, 2009
    #5
  6. Aardvark

    Aardvark Guest

    On Thu, 12 Nov 2009 09:50:48 -0800, Evan Platt wrote:

    > On Thu, 12 Nov 2009 14:55:24 GMT, Aardvark <>
    > wrote:
    >
    >>Do any of the readers of this group know the name for the following
    >>position sometimes assumed by a guard of honour at a military funeral?:
    >>
    >>Head bowed, rifle butt upwards with hands resting on butt, barrel
    >>resting on toe of boot.
    >>
    >>I was told its name (once) many years ago, but had forgotten minutes
    >>later.
    >>
    >>I'm searching for a specific photograph of a soldier in this position.
    >>The soldier must be in XIV army (WWII SEAC) jungle fatigues, complete
    >>with slouch hat and Enfield No.4 rifle and preferably facing
    >>three-quarters away from the camera ie the view of the observer being
    >>over one shoulder or the other but with the face in profile.

    >
    > I'm surprised richard hasn't come along and said "Ask mr. know it all,
    > evan platt".
    >
    > So let me get a jump start on this:
    >
    > Ask richard, after all, he is a highly decorated war hero.


    Yeah, right. I'll get right on that.

    HEY, RICHARD!!!!!!!!! OH, RICHARD!!!!!!!!

    :)



    --
    Elmo McElroy: If I wanted cuisine, I'd have gone to Paris
    Felix DeSouza: You can still go to France. It's full of pricks. They hate
    Yanks too. Do you fancy a bite, or what?
    Elmo Mc Elroy: Yeah, all right.
     
    Aardvark, Nov 12, 2009
    #6
  7. Aardvark

    Aardvark Guest

    On Thu, 12 Nov 2009 18:28:08 +0000, Aardvark wrote:

    >>>Yes, it is called "Rest on Arms Reversed"

    >>
    >> I was on funeral detail for several months at 2 posts and I never saw
    >> that. It must be foreign.

    >
    > If you see any pics of Reagan or JFK lying in State I think you might
    > find the servicemen around the coffin in the drill position I described.
    >


    And of course, having said that, I can't for the life of me see any of the
    servicemen standing around either coffin in the position I described.

    Oh, well :)



    --
    Elmo McElroy: If I wanted cuisine, I'd have gone to Paris
    Felix DeSouza: You can still go to France. It's full of pricks. They hate
    Yanks too. Do you fancy a bite, or what?
    Elmo Mc Elroy: Yeah, all right.
     
    Aardvark, Nov 12, 2009
    #7
  8. Aardvark

    richard Guest

    On Thu, 12 Nov 2009 09:50:48 -0800, Evan Platt wrote:

    > On Thu, 12 Nov 2009 14:55:24 GMT, Aardvark <>
    > wrote:
    >
    >>Do any of the readers of this group know the name for the following
    >>position sometimes assumed by a guard of honour at a military funeral?:
    >>
    >>Head bowed, rifle butt upwards with hands resting on butt, barrel resting
    >>on toe of boot.
    >>
    >>I was told its name (once) many years ago, but had forgotten minutes later.
    >>
    >>I'm searching for a specific photograph of a soldier in this position. The
    >>soldier must be in XIV army (WWII SEAC) jungle fatigues, complete with
    >>slouch hat and Enfield No.4 rifle and preferably facing three-quarters
    >>away from the camera ie the view of the observer being over one shoulder
    >>or the other but with the face in profile.

    >
    > I'm surprised richard hasn't come along and said "Ask mr. know it all,
    > evan platt".
    >
    > So let me get a jump start on this:
    >
    > Ask richard, after all, he is a highly decorated war hero.


    No I was not. I have never claimed to be one.
    At least I enlisted during time of war and did wear the uniform proudly.
    Unlike you. I have never served in combat and am not technically a veteran.

    Before you go mouthing off about it wrongly, I was discharged for medical
    standards. Which were changed a year later. And no, my dd214 does not show
    "dishonorable" it shows "honorable".
     
    richard, Nov 12, 2009
    #8
  9. Aardvark

    richard Guest

    On Thu, 12 Nov 2009 19:07:45 GMT, Aardvark wrote:

    > On Thu, 12 Nov 2009 18:28:08 +0000, Aardvark wrote:
    >
    >>>>Yes, it is called "Rest on Arms Reversed"
    >>>
    >>> I was on funeral detail for several months at 2 posts and I never saw
    >>> that. It must be foreign.

    >>
    >> If you see any pics of Reagan or JFK lying in State I think you might
    >> find the servicemen around the coffin in the drill position I described.
    >>

    >
    > And of course, having said that, I can't for the life of me see any of the
    > servicemen standing around either coffin in the position I described.
    >
    > Oh, well :)


    I think that may be because it is used for someone of high ranking who fell
    in battle. Just guessing. But I've only seen it a few times and the guards
    all seemed to be in full dress uniform.
     
    richard, Nov 12, 2009
    #9
  10. Aardvark

    richard Guest

    On Thu, 12 Nov 2009 14:55:24 GMT, Aardvark wrote:

    > Do any of the readers of this group know the name for the following
    > position sometimes assumed by a guard of honour at a military funeral?:
    >
    > Head bowed, rifle butt upwards with hands resting on butt, barrel resting
    > on toe of boot.
    >
    > I was told its name (once) many years ago, but had forgotten minutes later.
    >
    > I'm searching for a specific photograph of a soldier in this position. The
    > soldier must be in XIV army (WWII SEAC) jungle fatigues, complete with
    > slouch hat and Enfield No.4 rifle and preferably facing three-quarters
    > away from the camera ie the view of the observer being over one shoulder
    > or the other but with the face in profile.


    http://www.lancastermuseum.ca/cenotaph.html
     
    richard, Nov 12, 2009
    #10
  11. Aardvark

    richard Guest

    On Thu, 12 Nov 2009 13:19:22 -0800, Evan Platt wrote:

    > On Thu, 12 Nov 2009 14:15:49 -0700, richard <>
    > wrote:
    >
    >>No I was not. I have never claimed to be one.
    >>At least I enlisted during time of war and did wear the uniform proudly.

    >
    > For all of your, what, 86 days?
    >
    >>Unlike you. I have never served in combat and am not technically a veteran.

    >
    > Huh? Neither have I.
    >


    Because you need 91 days of active service to become a true vet.

    That's so the bootcamp "90 day wonders" can't get it.
     
    richard, Nov 12, 2009
    #11
  12. Aardvark

    Aardvark Guest

    On Thu, 12 Nov 2009 20:40:44 +0000, Scraggy wrote:

    > Aardvark wrote:
    >> On Thu, 12 Nov 2009 23:37:24 +0800, Oldus Fartus wrote:
    >>
    >>> Aardvark wrote:
    >>>> Do any of the readers of this group know the name for the following
    >>>> position sometimes assumed by a guard of honour at a military
    >>>> funeral?:
    >>>>
    >>>> Head bowed, rifle butt upwards with hands resting on butt, barrel
    >>>> resting on toe of boot.
    >>>>
    >>>> I was told its name (once) many years ago, but had forgotten minutes
    >>>> later.
    >>>>
    >>>> I'm searching for a specific photograph of a soldier in this
    >>>> position. The soldier must be in XIV army (WWII SEAC) jungle
    >>>> fatigues, complete with slouch hat and Enfield No.4 rifle and
    >>>> preferably facing three-quarters away from the camera ie the view of
    >>>> the observer being over one shoulder or the other but with the face
    >>>> in profile.
    >>>>
    >>>>
    >>>>
    >>>>
    >>> Yes, it is called "Rest on Arms Reversed"

    >>
    >> Thanks for that, mate. I'll work on that assumption, although it
    >> doesn't ring any bells.
    >>
    >> I've got a feeling the name of the position would be similar in both
    >> British and ANZAC forces, possibly Canadian too. There's no guessing
    >> what US forces would call it.
    >>
    >> Am I correct in assuming you're an Aussie? If so do you have any family
    >> connections with anyone who served in Burma under General Slim?

    >
    > The modern version.
    > http://www.qohldrs.co.uk/assets/images/west_kilbride_reverse_arms_1.jpg
    > Known as "Reverse Arms"


    Cheers, mate. I wondered how it could be done with the SA80. Now I know



    --
    Elmo McElroy: If I wanted cuisine, I'd have gone to Paris
    Felix DeSouza: You can still go to France. It's full of pricks. They hate
    Yanks too. Do you fancy a bite, or what?
    Elmo Mc Elroy: Yeah, all right.
     
    Aardvark, Nov 12, 2009
    #12
  13. Aardvark

    Aardvark Guest

    On Thu, 12 Nov 2009 13:55:11 -0800, Evan Platt wrote:

    > On Thu, 12 Nov 2009 14:49:32 -0700, richard <> wrote:
    >
    >>Because you need 91 days of active service to become a true vet.
    >>
    >>That's so the bootcamp "90 day wonders" can't get it.

    >
    > Or the people who get kicked out because they're certifiably nuts can't
    > claim it either.


    Obviously you've never read Joseph Heller's 'Catch-22' :)



    --
    Elmo McElroy: If I wanted cuisine, I'd have gone to Paris
    Felix DeSouza: You can still go to France. It's full of pricks. They hate
    Yanks too. Do you fancy a bite, or what?
    Elmo Mc Elroy: Yeah, all right.
     
    Aardvark, Nov 12, 2009
    #13
  14. Aardvark

    Aardvark Guest

    On Thu, 12 Nov 2009 14:08:22 -0600, Lookout wrote:

    > On Thu, 12 Nov 2009 18:28:08 GMT, Aardvark <>
    > wrote:
    >
    >>On Thu, 12 Nov 2009 11:18:22 -0600, Lookout wrote:
    >>
    >>> On Thu, 12 Nov 2009 23:37:24 +0800, Oldus Fartus
    >>> <> wrote:
    >>>
    >>>>Aardvark wrote:
    >>>>> Do any of the readers of this group know the name for the following
    >>>>> position sometimes assumed by a guard of honour at a military
    >>>>> funeral?:
    >>>>>
    >>>>> Head bowed, rifle butt upwards with hands resting on butt, barrel
    >>>>> resting on toe of boot.
    >>>>>
    >>>>> I was told its name (once) many years ago, but had forgotten minutes
    >>>>> later.
    >>>>>
    >>>>> I'm searching for a specific photograph of a soldier in this
    >>>>> position. The soldier must be in XIV army (WWII SEAC) jungle
    >>>>> fatigues, complete with slouch hat and Enfield No.4 rifle and
    >>>>> preferably facing three-quarters away from the camera ie the view of
    >>>>> the observer being over one shoulder or the other but with the face
    >>>>> in profile.
    >>>>>
    >>>>>
    >>>>>
    >>>>>
    >>>>Yes, it is called "Rest on Arms Reversed"
    >>>
    >>> I was on funeral detail for several months at 2 posts and I never saw
    >>> that. It must be foreign.

    >>
    >>If you see any pics of Reagan or JFK lying in State I think you might
    >>find the servicemen around the coffin in the drill position I described.

    >
    > Show me.


    I refer you to my post of 19.07 GMT.



    --
    Elmo McElroy: If I wanted cuisine, I'd have gone to Paris
    Felix DeSouza: You can still go to France. It's full of pricks. They hate
    Yanks too. Do you fancy a bite, or what?
    Elmo Mc Elroy: Yeah, all right.
     
    Aardvark, Nov 12, 2009
    #14
  15. Aardvark

    Mike Yetto Guest

    Bada bing richard <> bada bang:
    > On Thu, 12 Nov 2009 13:19:22 -0800, Evan Platt wrote:
    >
    >> On Thu, 12 Nov 2009 14:15:49 -0700, richard <>
    >> wrote:
    >>
    >>>No I was not. I have never claimed to be one.
    >>>At least I enlisted during time of war and did wear the uniform proudly.

    >>
    >> For all of your, what, 86 days?
    >>
    >>>Unlike you. I have never served in combat and am not technically a veteran.

    >>
    >> Huh? Neither have I.
    >>

    >
    > Because you need 91 days of active service to become a true vet.
    >
    > That's so the bootcamp "90 day wonders" can't get it.


    And I was sure they told me it was six months to be considered a
    veteran. If you left, or were removed, before then you were
    never in and could still be eligible for the draft. This was
    usually done to get rid of problems without incurring any
    obligations.

    Mike "but that was in 1970" Yetto
    --
    In theory, theory and practice are the same.
    In practice they are not.
     
    Mike Yetto, Nov 12, 2009
    #15
  16. Aardvark

    Aardvark Guest

    On Thu, 12 Nov 2009 14:29:21 -0700, richard wrote:

    > On Thu, 12 Nov 2009 14:55:24 GMT, Aardvark wrote:
    >
    >> Do any of the readers of this group know the name for the following
    >> position sometimes assumed by a guard of honour at a military funeral?:
    >>
    >> Head bowed, rifle butt upwards with hands resting on butt, barrel
    >> resting on toe of boot.
    >>
    >> I was told its name (once) many years ago, but had forgotten minutes
    >> later.
    >>
    >> I'm searching for a specific photograph of a soldier in this position.
    >> The soldier must be in XIV army (WWII SEAC) jungle fatigues, complete
    >> with slouch hat and Enfield No.4 rifle and preferably facing
    >> three-quarters away from the camera ie the view of the observer being
    >> over one shoulder or the other but with the face in profile.

    >
    > http://www.lancastermuseum.ca/cenotaph.html


    That's the position, yes. There's even a Mountie assuming it in the last
    picture, demonstrating that the memorial is in Canada.

    The cap and puttees on the statue show that the memorial is WWI, even
    before reading the plaques.

    But thanks anyway.



    --
    Elmo McElroy: If I wanted cuisine, I'd have gone to Paris
    Felix DeSouza: You can still go to France. It's full of pricks. They hate
    Yanks too. Do you fancy a bite, or what?
    Elmo Mc Elroy: Yeah, all right.
     
    Aardvark, Nov 13, 2009
    #16
  17. Aardvark

    Oldus Fartus Guest

    Aardvark wrote:
    > On Thu, 12 Nov 2009 23:37:24 +0800, Oldus Fartus wrote:
    >
    >> Aardvark wrote:
    >>> Do any of the readers of this group know the name for the following
    >>> position sometimes assumed by a guard of honour at a military funeral?:
    >>>
    >>> Head bowed, rifle butt upwards with hands resting on butt, barrel
    >>> resting on toe of boot.
    >>>
    >>> I was told its name (once) many years ago, but had forgotten minutes
    >>> later.
    >>>
    >>> I'm searching for a specific photograph of a soldier in this position.
    >>> The soldier must be in XIV army (WWII SEAC) jungle fatigues, complete
    >>> with slouch hat and Enfield No.4 rifle and preferably facing
    >>> three-quarters away from the camera ie the view of the observer being
    >>> over one shoulder or the other but with the face in profile.
    >>>
    >>>
    >>>
    >>>

    >> Yes, it is called "Rest on Arms Reversed"

    >
    > Thanks for that, mate. I'll work on that assumption, although it doesn't
    > ring any bells.
    >
    > I've got a feeling the name of the position would be similar in both
    > British and ANZAC forces, possibly Canadian too. There's no guessing what
    > US forces would call it.
    >


    http://www.diggerhistory.info/pages-tributes/mil-funerals.htm#Reversed Arms

    I am not sure about Canada, but I would be fairly confident that the
    term is the same in the British Forces as in the Anzac ones.

    (The reason I say that is that I have known the "drill" since I served
    in the Army Cadets in the 50s and the RAN from the 60s, when both
    Australian Navy and Army were very much still organised on British lines
    and traditions.)

    > Am I correct in assuming you're an Aussie? If so do you have any family
    > connections with anyone who served in Burma under General Slim?
    >


    Yes, very much an Aussie :)

    The only family connection to Burma, as far as I know, was an uncle, who
    was apparently a POW on the infamous Burma Railway. He died in the
    late 50s without having any children, and unfortunately, his experiences
    were never talked about.

    --
    Cheers
    Oldus Fartus
     
    Oldus Fartus, Nov 13, 2009
    #17
  18. Aardvark

    Syrius Guest

    "Aardvark" <> a écrit dans le message de news:
    XpYKm.34883$2...
    > On Thu, 12 Nov 2009 17:31:25 +0000, ~BD~ wrote:
    >
    >> Aardvark wrote:
    >>
    >>>> Yes, it is called "Rest on Arms Reversed"
    >>>
    >>> Thanks for that, mate. I'll work on that assumption, although it
    >>> doesn't ring any bells.
    >>>
    >>> I've got a feeling the name of the position would be similar in both
    >>> British and ANZAC forces, possibly Canadian too. There's no guessing
    >>> what US forces would call it.
    >>>
    >>> Am I correct in assuming you're an Aussie? If so do you have any family
    >>> connections with anyone who served in Burma under General Slim?
    >>>
    >>>

    >> You should *never* assume - CHECK!
    >>

    >
    > I did. I used his headers.
    >
    >> The Aussies never did do what we told them! ;)
    >>

    >
    > The poor buggers did at Suvla Bay and Gallipoli.
    >
    >> You might have noticed that that Old Fart took part in a RIMPAC exercise
    >> and lived in Canberra IIRC so there is a fair chance that he *is* from
    >> 'down under'!
    >>

    >
    > I remember someone saying that, but don't expect me to remember who. I've
    > slept since then.
    >
    >> What you might be looking to 'remember' is what is stated here:
    >>
    >> "A few feet from the marker, the Kings Own halted and then performed
    >> Mourn Arms. The musket is brought to Present Arms and then Mourn Arms is
    >> called. The musket is raised high and the muzzle is lowered slowly to
    >> point straight down. Hands are wrapped on the butt with elbows held
    >> high. Next, the elbows are lowered to the side, and then the head is
    >> lowered to the musket butt."
    >>
    >> Ref: http://www.kingsown.net/gall_horne.htm
    >>
    >> HTH

    >
    >
    > Thanks, it does. There's also a Mourn Arms on the march (slow march at
    > funerals) where one's weapon is tucked under the left arm with the butt
    > facing forward and up, muzzle rearward and down, with the barrel supported
    > by the right hand behind the back. I wonder how that's done with the SA80.
    >
    > Now if only I can get a SEAC photo like the one I described I'd be happy.
    >


    Go to this site :
    http://www.diggerhistory.info/pages-tributes/mil-funerals.htm
     
    Syrius, Nov 13, 2009
    #18
  19. Aardvark

    Oldus Fartus Guest

    Aardvark wrote:
    > On Thu, 12 Nov 2009 14:29:21 -0700, richard wrote:
    >
    >> On Thu, 12 Nov 2009 14:55:24 GMT, Aardvark wrote:
    >>
    >>> Do any of the readers of this group know the name for the following
    >>> position sometimes assumed by a guard of honour at a military funeral?:
    >>>
    >>> Head bowed, rifle butt upwards with hands resting on butt, barrel
    >>> resting on toe of boot.
    >>>
    >>> I was told its name (once) many years ago, but had forgotten minutes
    >>> later.
    >>>
    >>> I'm searching for a specific photograph of a soldier in this position.
    >>> The soldier must be in XIV army (WWII SEAC) jungle fatigues, complete
    >>> with slouch hat and Enfield No.4 rifle and preferably facing
    >>> three-quarters away from the camera ie the view of the observer being
    >>> over one shoulder or the other but with the face in profile.

    >>


    ..lancastermuseum.ca/cenotaph.html
    >
    > That's the position, yes. There's even a Mountie assuming it in the last
    > picture, demonstrating that the memorial is in Canada.
    >
    > The cap and puttees on the statue show that the memorial is WWI, even
    > before reading the plaques.
    >
    > But thanks anyway.
    >
    >
    >


    Yet another
    http://www.flickr.com/photos/fairynuff/503255721/in/set-72157600227518525/

    --
    Cheers
    Oldus Fartus
     
    Oldus Fartus, Nov 13, 2009
    #19
  20. Aardvark

    Aardvark Guest

    On Thu, 12 Nov 2009 18:49:29 -0600, Lookout wrote:

    > On Thu, 12 Nov 2009 23:06:54 GMT, Aardvark <>
    > wrote:
    >
    >>On Thu, 12 Nov 2009 14:08:22 -0600, Lookout wrote:
    >>
    >>> On Thu, 12 Nov 2009 18:28:08 GMT, Aardvark <>
    >>> wrote:
    >>>
    >>>>On Thu, 12 Nov 2009 11:18:22 -0600, Lookout wrote:
    >>>>
    >>>>> On Thu, 12 Nov 2009 23:37:24 +0800, Oldus Fartus
    >>>>> <> wrote:
    >>>>>
    >>>>>>Aardvark wrote:
    >>>>>>> Do any of the readers of this group know the name for the
    >>>>>>> following position sometimes assumed by a guard of honour at a
    >>>>>>> military funeral?:
    >>>>>>>
    >>>>>>> Head bowed, rifle butt upwards with hands resting on butt, barrel
    >>>>>>> resting on toe of boot.
    >>>>>>>
    >>>>>>> I was told its name (once) many years ago, but had forgotten
    >>>>>>> minutes later.
    >>>>>>>
    >>>>>>> I'm searching for a specific photograph of a soldier in this
    >>>>>>> position. The soldier must be in XIV army (WWII SEAC) jungle
    >>>>>>> fatigues, complete with slouch hat and Enfield No.4 rifle and
    >>>>>>> preferably facing three-quarters away from the camera ie the view
    >>>>>>> of the observer being over one shoulder or the other but with the
    >>>>>>> face in profile.
    >>>>>>>
    >>>>>>>
    >>>>>>>
    >>>>>>>
    >>>>>>Yes, it is called "Rest on Arms Reversed"
    >>>>>
    >>>>> I was on funeral detail for several months at 2 posts and I never
    >>>>> saw that. It must be foreign.
    >>>>
    >>>>If you see any pics of Reagan or JFK lying in State I think you might
    >>>>find the servicemen around the coffin in the drill position I
    >>>>described.
    >>>
    >>> Show me.

    >>
    >>I refer you to my post of 19.07 GMT.

    >
    > I saw it.


    Then you'll know that I was incorrect in what I said.

    > Try again.


    No. As you have a great deal with logic and reading comprehension, I'll
    retype what I wrote in the previous post, only this time I'll stress the
    important words.

    "If you see any pics of Reagan or JFK lying in State I *think* you *might*
    find the servicemen around the coffin in the drill position I
    described."

    The two words I have stressed indicate my uncertainty of the statement I
    was making. My uncertainty later transpired to be warranted, as on a later
    search of pictures of the events I mentioned, the posture of the
    servicemen was not as I had somewhat thought it might be.

    I hope you can understand that when it's broken down into simple language
    for you.

    Although I doubt it.



    --
    Elmo McElroy: If I wanted cuisine, I'd have gone to Paris
    Felix DeSouza: You can still go to France. It's full of pricks. They hate
    Yanks too. Do you fancy a bite, or what?
    Elmo Mc Elroy: Yeah, all right.
     
    Aardvark, Nov 13, 2009
    #20
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