Migration to BSD/Open source from Windows

Discussion in 'NZ Computing' started by thing2, Oct 25, 2005.

  1. thing2

    thing2 Guest

    thing2, Oct 25, 2005
    #1
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  2. thing2

    Shane Guest

    On Wed, 26 Oct 2005 09:22:43 +1300, thing2 wrote:

    > Pricewaterhouse....not a small company either.....
    >
    > http://www.computerworld.com.au/index.php/id;1375194866;fp;2;fpid;1
    >
    > regards
    >
    > Thing


    OpenBSD 3.8 is due for release in 7 days as well (1st november wherever
    his servers are)
    *drools*
    Heres some of the upcoming changes
    http://openbsd.org/38.html
    and ospfd is looking like its made a few steps forward (the sooner it
    catches up to cisco the betterer)

    heres hoping a trend has been started..
    http://openbsd.org/errata.html

    count em.. 5 patches TOTAL for OpenBSD 3.7 (to date)




    --
    Hardware, n.: The parts of a computer system that can be kicked

    The best way to get the right answer on usenet is to post the wrong one.
     
    Shane, Oct 25, 2005
    #2
    1. Advertising

  3. T'was the Wed, 26 Oct 2005 10:40:46 +1300 when I remembered Shane
    <-a-geek.net> saying something like this:

    >heres hoping a trend has been started..
    >http://openbsd.org/errata.html
    >
    >count em.. 5 patches TOTAL for OpenBSD 3.7 (to date)


    This is impressive! I guess it's time for me to start learning a bit
    of OpenBSD:)
    --
    Cheers,

    Waylon Kenning.
     
    Waylon Kenning, Oct 26, 2005
    #3
  4. thing2

    randomiser Guest

    "Shane" <-a-geek.net> wrote in message
    news:p-a-geek.net...
    > On Wed, 26 Oct 2005 09:22:43 +1300, thing2 wrote:
    >
    >> Pricewaterhouse....not a small company either.....
    >>
    >> http://www.computerworld.com.au/index.php/id;1375194866;fp;2;fpid;1
    >>
    >> regards
    >>
    >> Thing

    >
    > OpenBSD 3.8 is due for release in 7 days as well (1st november wherever
    > his servers are)
    > *drools*
    > Heres some of the upcoming changes
    > http://openbsd.org/38.html
    > and ospfd is looking like its made a few steps forward (the sooner it
    > catches up to cisco the betterer)
    >
    > heres hoping a trend has been started..
    > http://openbsd.org/errata.html
    >
    > count em.. 5 patches TOTAL for OpenBSD 3.7 (to date)
    >
    >
    >
    >
    > --
    > Hardware, n.: The parts of a computer system that can be kicked
    >
    > The best way to get the right answer on usenet is to post the wrong one.
    >


    I can't see that patch count is a very good measure of anything. The
    developer can wait and bundle a whole bunch of fixes into one patch or even
    issue no patches at all. Surely the number of issue advisories and the
    severity of them is a better yardstick

    http://secunia.com/product/100/
    http://secunia.com/product/1174/
    http://secunia.com/product/2535/

    I realise that there's no good apples with apples comparison when it comes
    to security but patch count is definitely one of the silliest I can think
    of.
     
    randomiser, Oct 26, 2005
    #4
  5. thing2

    Shane Guest

    On Thu, 27 Oct 2005 08:54:06 +1300, randomiser wrote:

    > "Shane" <-a-geek.net> wrote in message
    > news:p-a-geek.net...
    >> On Wed, 26 Oct 2005 09:22:43 +1300, thing2 wrote:
    >>
    >>> Pricewaterhouse....not a small company either.....
    >>>
    >>> http://www.computerworld.com.au/index.php/id;1375194866;fp;2;fpid;1
    >>>
    >>> regards
    >>>
    >>> Thing

    >>
    >> OpenBSD 3.8 is due for release in 7 days as well (1st november wherever
    >> his servers are)
    >> *drools*
    >> Heres some of the upcoming changes
    >> http://openbsd.org/38.html
    >> and ospfd is looking like its made a few steps forward (the sooner it
    >> catches up to cisco the betterer)
    >>
    >> heres hoping a trend has been started..
    >> http://openbsd.org/errata.html
    >>
    >> count em.. 5 patches TOTAL for OpenBSD 3.7 (to date)
    >>
    >>
    >>
    >>
    >> --
    >> Hardware, n.: The parts of a computer system that can be kicked
    >>
    >> The best way to get the right answer on usenet is to post the wrong one.
    >>

    >
    > I can't see that patch count is a very good measure of anything. The
    > developer can wait and bundle a whole bunch of fixes into one patch or even
    > issue no patches at all. Surely the number of issue advisories and the
    > severity of them is a better yardstick
    >
    > http://secunia.com/product/100/
    > http://secunia.com/product/1174/
    > http://secunia.com/product/2535/
    >
    > I realise that there's no good apples with apples comparison when it comes
    > to security but patch count is definitely one of the silliest I can think
    > of.


    hmm food for thought, although the vulnerability count for 2005 for
    OpenBSD was.. 10 Vulnerabilitys 'found'
    http://secunia.com/product/100/#advisories_2005
    of that _ALL_ were patched,
    taking that and the fact only 5 patches were released for OpenBSD 3.7,
    we can safely say in this case patch count did equate to something
    In fact
    http://secunia.com/graph/?type=sol&period=all&prod=100
    there are _no_ unpatched vulnerabilities in secunias database for OpenBSD

    Definitely though patch count can be misleading when companies have
    vulnerabilities reported to them, and take up to a year(or more) to patch
    them But given OpenBSD's track record, its a fair bet that the patch count
    reflects the number of vulnerabilities found

    http://www.eeye.com/html/research/upcoming/
    this only shows current 'discoveries' that are waiting to be patched
    I cant be assed finding Oracle or Cisco type stats, but they are up there
    with Microsoft



    --
    Hardware, n.: The parts of a computer system that can be kicked

    The best way to get the right answer on usenet is to post the wrong one.
     
    Shane, Oct 26, 2005
    #5
  6. thing2

    thingy Guest

    randomiser wrote:
    > "Shane" <-a-geek.net> wrote in message
    > news:p-a-geek.net...
    >
    >>On Wed, 26 Oct 2005 09:22:43 +1300, thing2 wrote:
    >>
    >>
    >>>Pricewaterhouse....not a small company either.....
    >>>
    >>>http://www.computerworld.com.au/index.php/id;1375194866;fp;2;fpid;1
    >>>
    >>>regards
    >>>
    >>>Thing

    >>
    >>OpenBSD 3.8 is due for release in 7 days as well (1st november wherever
    >>his servers are)
    >>*drools*
    >>Heres some of the upcoming changes
    >>http://openbsd.org/38.html
    >>and ospfd is looking like its made a few steps forward (the sooner it
    >>catches up to cisco the betterer)
    >>
    >>heres hoping a trend has been started..
    >>http://openbsd.org/errata.html
    >>
    >>count em.. 5 patches TOTAL for OpenBSD 3.7 (to date)
    >>
    >>
    >>
    >>
    >>--
    >>Hardware, n.: The parts of a computer system that can be kicked
    >>
    >>The best way to get the right answer on usenet is to post the wrong one.
    >>

    >
    >
    > I can't see that patch count is a very good measure of anything. The
    > developer can wait and bundle a whole bunch of fixes into one patch or even
    > issue no patches at all. Surely the number of issue advisories and the
    > severity of them is a better yardstick
    >
    > http://secunia.com/product/100/
    > http://secunia.com/product/1174/
    > http://secunia.com/product/2535/
    >
    > I realise that there's no good apples with apples comparison when it comes
    > to security but patch count is definitely one of the silliest I can think
    > of.
    >
    >



    I tend to agree, if I have my own OS and never patch it, it would be
    even better that *BSD....not.....

    This is why many security sites try and attach a risk and impact to an
    issue.

    regards

    Thing
     
    thingy, Oct 27, 2005
    #6
  7. thing2

    Judges1318 Guest

    Waylon Kenning wrote:

    >
    > This is impressive! I guess it's time for me to start learning a bit
    > of OpenBSD:)



    Horses for courses, as they say.

    The code for OpenBSD is heavily re/super/vised and cross-checked
    and verified. Their keyword is - security! So OpenBSD is for
    the safety of data, reliability of the servers, defense against
    hacking of all sorts. SSH (secure shell), the command shell
    with built-in en/de/cription is their product.

    FreeBSD is another BSD derivative, but their keyword is: performance!
    Mail server for 50000000 users, no sweat! 4 TB (that is terabytes)
    file system, easy peasy! Not many platforms supported (maybe 4-5,
    Intel based PC and Alpha stations definitely). The well kept
    secret is the FreeBSD porting system: almost anything open-source
    will have an acompanying script that will download the source
    code, compile it, and install it. Stunning! Some Linux
    distributions also have a similar feature.

    Linux is the b/leading edge of the personal computing. Wide user base,
    and the users (well, mostly) are far from being dunces. Drivers for
    most obscure hardware appear almost as soon as the hardware, and since
    open source, there is immense debugging power supporting them. The
    open source sofware for anything imaginable is appearing so fast
    that it is scary. And it is not so that it is free to download. It
    is more that, it is that it is free to inspect and modify. If it
    does not fit your purpose, you lift the bonnet, you screw on the bit
    you want, and on you go. If you do not know how to fix it, chances
    are you can find someone within a (country) mile distance that will
    do it for you - well, for a fee, Linux people are not exactly
    against capitalism.

    Also, NetBSD, another BSD derivative, and Linux too, will perhaps
    not run on your tea-kettle, but will on almost anything else on
    the electric grid. Though, your kettle may have a microcontroller
    built in, in which case you could perhaps find at least a working
    loader, a task swapper, a file-system and a sort of tetris you can
    download and install.

    However, one thing you have nailed down - start learning!
     
    Judges1318, Oct 27, 2005
    #7
  8. thing2

    Chris Hope Guest

    Judges1318 wrote:

    > Waylon Kenning wrote:
    >
    >>
    >> This is impressive! I guess it's time for me to start learning a bit
    >> of OpenBSD:)

    >
    >
    > Horses for courses, as they say.
    >
    > The code for OpenBSD is heavily re/super/vised and cross-checked
    > and verified. Their keyword is - security! So OpenBSD is for
    > the safety of data, reliability of the servers, defense against
    > hacking of all sorts. SSH (secure shell), the command shell
    > with built-in en/de/cription is their product.
    >
    > FreeBSD is another BSD derivative, but their keyword is: performance!
    > Mail server for 50000000 users, no sweat! 4 TB (that is terabytes)
    > file system, easy peasy! Not many platforms supported (maybe 4-5,
    > Intel based PC and Alpha stations definitely). The well kept
    > secret is the FreeBSD porting system: almost anything open-source
    > will have an acompanying script that will download the source
    > code, compile it, and install it. Stunning! Some Linux
    > distributions also have a similar feature.
    >
    > Linux is the b/leading edge of the personal computing. Wide user
    > base,
    > and the users (well, mostly) are far from being dunces. Drivers for
    > most obscure hardware appear almost as soon as the hardware, and since
    > open source, there is immense debugging power supporting them. The
    > open source sofware for anything imaginable is appearing so fast
    > that it is scary. And it is not so that it is free to download. It
    > is more that, it is that it is free to inspect and modify. If it
    > does not fit your purpose, you lift the bonnet, you screw on the bit
    > you want, and on you go. If you do not know how to fix it, chances
    > are you can find someone within a (country) mile distance that will
    > do it for you - well, for a fee, Linux people are not exactly
    > against capitalism.
    >
    > Also, NetBSD, another BSD derivative, and Linux too, will perhaps
    > not run on your tea-kettle, but will on almost anything else on
    > the electric grid. Though, your kettle may have a microcontroller
    > built in, in which case you could perhaps find at least a working
    > loader, a task swapper, a file-system and a sort of tetris you can
    > download and install.
    >
    > However, one thing you have nailed down - start learning!


    I think I saw on /. that someone had ported NetBSD to a toaster...

    --
    Chris Hope | www.electrictoolbox.com | www.linuxcdmall.co.nz
     
    Chris Hope, Oct 27, 2005
    #8
  9. thing2

    Shane Guest

    On Thu, 27 Oct 2005 16:51:33 +1300, Chris Hope wrote:

    > Judges1318 wrote:
    >
    >> Waylon Kenning wrote:
    >>
    >>>
    >>> This is impressive! I guess it's time for me to start learning a bit
    >>> of OpenBSD:)

    >>
    >>
    >> Horses for courses, as they say.
    >>
    >> The code for OpenBSD is heavily re/super/vised and cross-checked
    >> and verified. Their keyword is - security! So OpenBSD is for
    >> the safety of data, reliability of the servers, defense against
    >> hacking of all sorts. SSH (secure shell), the command shell
    >> with built-in en/de/cription is their product.
    >>
    >> FreeBSD is another BSD derivative, but their keyword is: performance!
    >> Mail server for 50000000 users, no sweat! 4 TB (that is terabytes)
    >> file system, easy peasy! Not many platforms supported (maybe 4-5,
    >> Intel based PC and Alpha stations definitely). The well kept
    >> secret is the FreeBSD porting system: almost anything open-source
    >> will have an acompanying script that will download the source
    >> code, compile it, and install it. Stunning! Some Linux
    >> distributions also have a similar feature.
    >>
    >> Linux is the b/leading edge of the personal computing. Wide user
    >> base,
    >> and the users (well, mostly) are far from being dunces. Drivers for
    >> most obscure hardware appear almost as soon as the hardware, and since
    >> open source, there is immense debugging power supporting them. The
    >> open source sofware for anything imaginable is appearing so fast
    >> that it is scary. And it is not so that it is free to download. It
    >> is more that, it is that it is free to inspect and modify. If it
    >> does not fit your purpose, you lift the bonnet, you screw on the bit
    >> you want, and on you go. If you do not know how to fix it, chances
    >> are you can find someone within a (country) mile distance that will
    >> do it for you - well, for a fee, Linux people are not exactly
    >> against capitalism.
    >>
    >> Also, NetBSD, another BSD derivative, and Linux too, will perhaps
    >> not run on your tea-kettle, but will on almost anything else on
    >> the electric grid. Though, your kettle may have a microcontroller
    >> built in, in which case you could perhaps find at least a working
    >> loader, a task swapper, a file-system and a sort of tetris you can
    >> download and install.
    >>


    Heh.. nicely put

    >> However, one thing you have nailed down - start learning!

    >
    > I think I saw on /. that someone had ported NetBSD to a toaster...


    http://hardware.slashdot.org/article.pl?sid=05/08/11/1754253&from=rss
    http://www.embeddedarm.com/~joff/
    The interesting thing (to me) is its using ARM processors,
    There are ARM processors in some PDA's
    and a Debian port for said proc's
    http://www.debian.org/ports/arm/

    to cut a long ramble short.. way cool :)

    --
    Hardware, n.: The parts of a computer system that can be kicked

    The best way to get the right answer on usenet is to post the wrong one.
     
    Shane, Oct 27, 2005
    #9
  10. thing2

    Chris Hope Guest

    Shane wrote:

    [snip]

    >> I think I saw on /. that someone had ported NetBSD to a toaster...

    >
    > http://hardware.slashdot.org/article.pl?sid=05/08/11/1754253&from=rss
    > http://www.embeddedarm.com/~joff/
    > The interesting thing (to me) is its using ARM processors,
    > There are ARM processors in some PDA's
    > and a Debian port for said proc's
    > http://www.debian.org/ports/arm/
    >
    > to cut a long ramble short.. way cool :)


    Shame there's no photo of it.


    --
    Chris Hope | www.electrictoolbox.com | www.linuxcdmall.co.nz
     
    Chris Hope, Oct 27, 2005
    #10
  11. thing2

    Gordon Guest

    On Thu, 27 Oct 2005 16:48:57 +1300, Judges1318 wrote:

    > If you do not know how to fix it, chances
    > are you can find someone within a (country) mile distance that will
    > do it for you - well, for a fee, Linux people are not exactly
    > against capitalism.


    Free as in speech, not as in beer.

    The Penguin will buy fish if she catches none but does not fish for money.
     
    Gordon, Oct 27, 2005
    #11
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