Microsoft's Open Sores

Discussion in 'NZ Computing' started by Lawrence D'Oliveiro, Jul 29, 2007.

  1. Microsoft is having real trouble deciding what to do about this Open-Source
    thing.

    During the annual financial analysis conference on Friday, CEO Steve Ballmer
    identified four key areas where Microsoft is facing competition
    <http://www.microsoft-watch.com/content/corporate/ballmer_1_billion_windows_served.html>.
    Trouble is, it's only going to expand agressively into three of them: for
    the fourth one--Open-Source software--it's simply going to pretend that
    doing what it's already doing, only more so, will somehow prevail against
    the threat.

    Or is that really the case? Does Microsoft's left hand really know what its
    right hand is doing? At the same time as Ballmer is saying the above, other
    parts of Microsoft are making new "Open-Source-friendly" moves
    <http://www.microsoft-watch.com/content/corporate/microsofts_open_source_contradiction.html>.

    Oh, and just to add to the general hilarity, Microsoft is planning to submit
    its "shared-source" licences for certification as "Open-Source" licences by
    the Open Source Initiative
    <http://computerworld.com/action/article.do?command=viewArticleBasic&articleId=9028242&intsrc=hm_list>.
    Now, how far do you think they'll get with a licence that doesn't actually
    permit you to do anything with the source code?

    And in other news, Microsoft's ongoing attempts to try to make OOXML a
    respectable, official standard keep hitting new roadblocks
    <http://arstechnica.com/news.ars/post/20070726-office-open-xml-iso-certification-process-grows-even-murkier-for-microsoft.html>.
     
    Lawrence D'Oliveiro, Jul 29, 2007
    #1
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  2. Lawrence D'Oliveiro

    Rob S Guest

    Lawrence D'Oliveiro wrote:

    > And in other news, Microsoft's ongoing attempts to try to make OOXML a
    > respectable, official standard keep hitting new roadblocks
    > <http://arstechnica.com/news.ars/post/20070726-office-open-xml-iso-certification-process-grows-even-murkier-for-microsoft.html>.


    Unfortunately, the last sentence just about sums it up and explains why
    Microsoft gets away with various dubious actions while the OSS groups
    and individuals remain at war within themselves.

    "Some European governments are already working on forking ODF to come up
    with yet another standard, ODEF, that is more suitable for their
    archiving needs."

    then some Asian developers will fork it again because it contains too
    many unlucky numbers, and on we go. </facetious mode>
    --

    Rob
    - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -
    http://www.aspir8or.com
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    Linux means productivity and fun. NT means 'Not Today'.
    - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -
     
    Rob S, Jul 29, 2007
    #2
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  3. Lawrence D'Oliveiro

    peterwn Guest

    Rob S wrote:

    > Unfortunately, the last sentence just about sums it up and explains why
    > Microsoft gets away with various dubious actions while the OSS groups
    > and individuals remain at war within themselves.


    "at war" is too harsh a term - this is the FUD like impression that some
    like to give. More like a bazaar.

    >
    > "Some European governments are already working on forking ODF to come up
    > with yet another standard, ODEF, that is more suitable for their
    > archiving needs."
    >


    Standards evolve and are replaced over the years. No one for example
    has objected that standards for (say) high voltage circuit breakers used
    by power companies have changed enormously from the 1920's to the
    present day (in fact a 1920's standard circuit breaker would be regarded
    as a hazard today).

    Assuming that the ODEF standard gains traction and fully but concisely
    describes the formats used, there would be no fundamental problems.
    Adapting software and writing converters to accommodate it would be
    almost trivial compared with dealing with some current formats and a
    certain proposed 'standard' format. In any case for economy of effort,
    the proponents will probably 'recycle' as much ODF material as possible
    (they are quite free to do this), and this will make adaptations and
    conversions even easier to produce.

    More likely, this work is likely to 'collapse' into an enhanced ODF.
     
    peterwn, Jul 29, 2007
    #3
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