Microsoft Word Question

Discussion in 'A+ Certification' started by Tom Conlon, Feb 21, 2006.

  1. Tom Conlon

    Tom Conlon Guest

    I have a question for all you Microsoft Word gurus out there.

    I'm in the process of writing up a new Lab Manual for a Microprocessor
    course that I teach.

    Some of the signals that are used in the labs are negated (i.e., WR NOT).
    The Signal names have the NOT bar over them.

    How do I put the bar over the signal names? I could habd draw the bae, but
    that's a pain in the butt. I'd like to be able to do it from within Word.

    Anyone have any ideas? I'll appreciate all responses.

    Thanks,
    Tom
    Tom Conlon, Feb 21, 2006
    #1
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  2. Tom Conlon

    J. Clarke Guest

    Tom Conlon wrote:

    > I have a question for all you Microsoft Word gurus out there.
    >
    > I'm in the process of writing up a new Lab Manual for a Microprocessor
    > course that I teach.
    >
    > Some of the signals that are used in the labs are negated (i.e., WR NOT).
    > The Signal names have the NOT bar over them.
    >
    > How do I put the bar over the signal names? I could habd draw the bae,
    > but
    > that's a pain in the butt. I'd like to be able to do it from within Word.
    >
    > Anyone have any ideas? I'll appreciate all responses.
    >
    > Thanks,
    > Tom


    Quick and dirty way to do it is to Insert/Object/Microsoft Equation and in
    the equation editor toolbar, on the second row a little right of center you
    should see bar-over.

    If you don't have Equation in some form in the list of objects to insert,
    you need to install the equation editor off of the Word CD--I don't recall
    if it's part of the default installation.

    If you've never used the equation editor before you may have to play with it
    a little until you get the hang of it--it's not all that intuitive. Play
    with "style" and with "format spacing"--something non-obvious is that the
    thickness of the bar is controlled by the "fraction bar thickness" setting
    in "Format/Spacing"

    --
    --John
    to email, dial "usenet" and validate
    (was jclarke at eye bee em dot net)
    J. Clarke, Feb 22, 2006
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  3. Tom Conlon

    JohnO Guest

    Second what John C says...equation editor is the only way. Custom fonts
    will come back to bite you in the butt some day when you lose the hdd
    but have the docs. BTDT. Be aware that if you ever have to send these
    docs to some other DTP program, the EE equations aren't likely to make
    the trip.

    If you were using a real layout program <g> such as InDesign, you can
    setup a character style with custom underlines and strikethroughs,
    which lets you even do double overbars without fooling around. Or
    MathType, EE's big brother.

    Can you tell I ran into the same issue once?

    -John O
    JohnO, Feb 22, 2006
    #3
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