Microsoft Product Support Lifecycle

Discussion in 'NZ Computing' started by Rob J, Jun 30, 2005.

  1. Rob J

    Rob J Guest

    http://support.microsoft.com/?LN=en-nz&x=16&y=9&scid=fh;en-us%
    3Blifecycle

    Product Lifecycle Details
    Length of Support:

    Microsoft will offer a minimum of 10 years support (5 years of Mainstream
    support and 5 years of Extended) for Business and Developer products.

    Microsoft will offer a minimum of 5 years of Mainstream support for
    Consumer, Hardware, Multimedia products, and the Microsoft Business
    Solutions products.

    Microsoft will offer a minimum of 3 years of Mainstream support for
    products that are released annually, for example, Money, Encarta, Picture
    It!, and Streets & Trips.

    Mainstream support includes:

    * Incident support (no-charge incident support, paid incident
    support, support charged on an hourly basis, support for warranty claims)
    * Security update support
    * The ability to request non-security hotfixes

    Extended support includes:

    * Paid support
    * Security update support at no additional cost
    * Non-security related hotfix support requires a separate Extended
    Hotfix Support contract to be purchased. Per-fix fees also apply.
    * Microsoft will not accept requests for warranty support, design
    changes, or new features during the Extended support phase.
    * Extended support is not available for Consumer, Hardware,
    Multimedia, and Business Solutions.

    Self-help online support is available for a minimum of 10 years after the
    product is released. By using Microsoft=3Fs online Knowledge Base articles,
    FAQs, troubleshooting tools, and other resources, many customers can
    quickly resolve their issues without contacting Microsoft directly.

    Visit the Select A Product page to find the support timelines for your
    particular product.
    Service Pack Policy Details

    As part of the effort to continually improve Microsoft software, updates
    and fixes are created and released for recognized issues. Regularly, many
    of these fixes are combined into a single package (called a service pack)
    which is made available for installation. Service packs are cumulative,
    meaning that each new service pack contains all the fixes that are
    included with previous service packs and any new fixes. This is done so
    that you do not have to install an earlier version of a service pack
    before you install the latest version. A Security Rollup Package (SRP)
    provides a cumulative rollup of security updates that have been offered
    since the last SRP.

    Visit the Supported Service Pack page to find the support timelines for
    your particular product=3Fs service pack.

    Service Pack Support Policy

    * When a service pack is released, Microsoft will provide 12 months
    of support for the previous service pack.
    * Support may be extended to 24 months for those service packs where
    Microsoft believes customers will need additional time for testing and
    deployment.
    * Microsoft will announce that support for a previous service pack is
    extended when the new service pack is released.
    * When support for a product ends, support of the service packs for
    that product will also end. The product=3Fs support lifecycle supersedes
    the service pack support policy.

    This support policy permits customers to receive existing hotfixes or
    request new hotfixes for the supported service packs during the
    mainstream phase.

    Service packs are not automatically modified to include hotfixes
    developed after the service pack=3Fs initial release date. If you want an
    older service pack to be modified to include hotfixes developed after the
    service pack has released, then contact Microsoft and request the
    modification.

    Security updates released with bulletins from the Microsoft Security
    Response Center will be reviewed and built for the immediately preceding
    service pack whenever commercially possible.

    Microsoft strongly recommends that customers evaluate and install current
    service packs in a timely manner to make sure systems are up-to-date with
    the most recent security software. Service packs are available on the
    Service Packs for Microsoft Products Web site.
    Security Update Details
    At Microsoft, we are committed to providing secure products. Our long-
    term goal is to remove security vulnerabilities from all our products
    before they are released. This is a key element of our vision =3F to
    realize the dream of Trustworthy Computing. While we strive to remove
    vulnerabilities during development, software vulnerabilities remain a
    fact of life today and we must be prepared to respond when they are
    discovered.

    Security Update Policy
    Microsoft will provide security update support for a minimum of 10 years
    (through the Extended support phase) for Business and Developer products.

    Microsoft will provide security update support through the Mainstream
    support phase for Consumer, Hardware, Multimedia, and Business Solution
    products.

    * Security updates will be available from Windows Update during the
    mainstream support phase, and the first 2 years of Extended support (if
    available).
    * Security updates will be available from the Microsoft Download
    Center during the final three years of the extended support period (if
    available). If Microsoft suspects that a security update may help prevent
    a significant threat, the update may be available fromWindows Update.
    * Microsoft advises customers to install the latest product releases,
    security updates, and service packs to remain as secure as possible.
    Older products, such as Windows NT 4.0, may not meet today=3Fs more
    demanding security requirements. It may not be possible for Microsoft to
    provide security updates for older products.

    Visit the Microsoft Security and Privacy Web site for information about
    Microsoft privacy policies and the latest security bulletins, virus
    alerts, and security downloads.
     
    Rob J, Jun 30, 2005
    #1
    1. Advertising

  2. Rob J

    Peter Guest

    Rob J wrote:
    <snip>

    Microsoft must be getting desperate, they're resorting to spam, now.
     
    Peter, Jun 30, 2005
    #2
    1. Advertising

  3. Rob J

    Rob J Guest

    In article <> in nz.comp on Thu, 30 Jun 2005
    19:28:30 +1200, Peter <> says...
    > Rob J wrote:
    > <snip>
    >
    > Microsoft must be getting desperate, they're resorting to spam, now.


    No, you're desperate, to label an obvious quotation from a Microsoft web
    page as spam.
     
    Rob J, Jun 30, 2005
    #3
  4. In article <>,
    Rob J <> wrote:

    >In article <> in nz.comp on Thu, 30 Jun 2005
    >19:28:30 +1200, Peter <> says...
    >> Rob J wrote:
    >> <snip>
    >>
    >> Microsoft must be getting desperate, they're resorting to spam, now.

    >
    >No, you're desperate, to label an obvious quotation from a Microsoft web
    >page as spam.


    Unsolicited commercial promotion => spam.
     
    Lawrence D¹Oliveiro, Jul 15, 2005
    #4
  5. Rob J

    Rob J Guest

    On Fri, 15 Jul 2005 23:47:06 +1200, Lawrence D¹Oliveiro
    <_zealand> wrote:

    >In article <>,
    > Rob J <> wrote:
    >
    >>In article <> in nz.comp on Thu, 30 Jun 2005
    >>19:28:30 +1200, Peter <> says...
    >>> Rob J wrote:
    >>> <snip>
    >>>
    >>> Microsoft must be getting desperate, they're resorting to spam, now.

    >>
    >>No, you're desperate, to label an obvious quotation from a Microsoft web
    >>page as spam.

    >
    >Unsolicited commercial promotion => spam.


    Only when posted by the commercial entity in question.

    Quoting from a commercial website is not spam.
     
    Rob J, Jul 16, 2005
    #5
  6. Lawrence D¹Oliveiro wrote:
    >>>Microsoft must be getting desperate, they're resorting to spam, now.


    >>No, you're desperate, to label an obvious quotation from a Microsoft web
    >>page as spam.


    > Unsolicited commercial promotion => spam.


    so if I quote something from a commercial site, then I am spamming...
    ahh, ok then.

    --
    http://dave.net.nz <- My personal site.
    http://synaptic.net.nz <- Dunedin Based IT and ISP services
     
    Dave - Dave.net.nz, Jul 17, 2005
    #6
    1. Advertising

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