Microsoft: Linux is a threat, it may mean prices cuts and less businessfor us

Discussion in 'NZ Computing' started by thing, Sep 5, 2004.

  1. thing

    thing Guest

    September 03 2004
    by Jo Best
    "Filing shows just how much open source is worrying Redmond.

    Microsoft has filed a report with the Securities and Exchange Commission
    (SEC) - and it looks like the Redmond giant could be in for a lean year
    ahead, even going as far as to hint that Linux and other open-source
    rivals might be to blame........"

    I like SEC filings, no matter how much fantasy a company has in a press
    release, lye to the SEC and your in doggy do do past your eye balls.....

    http://software.silicon.com/os/0,39024651,39123685,00.htm

    regards

    Thing
     
    thing, Sep 5, 2004
    #1
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  2. thing

    Divine Guest

    Re: Microsoft: Linux is a threat, it may mean prices cuts and less business for us

    On Sun, 05 Sep 2004 13:31:44 +1200, thing wrote:

    > Microsoft has filed a report with the Securities and Exchange Commission
    > (SEC) - and it looks like the Redmond giant could be in for a lean year
    > ahead, even going as far as to hint that Linux and other open-source
    > rivals might be to blame........"
    >
    > I like SEC filings, no matter how much fantasy a company has in a press
    > release, lye to the SEC and your in doggy do do past your eye balls.....
    >
    > http://software.silicon.com/os/0,39024651,39123685,00.htm


    Interesting article. Thanks for posting it.


    Divine

    --
    "Even the most fanatical Microsoft supporter has to see that Longhorn has
    become Shorthorn."
     
    Divine, Sep 5, 2004
    #2
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  3. thing

    thing Guest

    Re: Microsoft: Linux is a threat, it may mean prices cuts and lessbusiness for us

    Divine wrote:
    > On Sun, 05 Sep 2004 13:31:44 +1200, thing wrote:
    >
    >
    >>Microsoft has filed a report with the Securities and Exchange Commission
    >>(SEC) - and it looks like the Redmond giant could be in for a lean year
    >>ahead, even going as far as to hint that Linux and other open-source
    >>rivals might be to blame........"
    >>
    >>I like SEC filings, no matter how much fantasy a company has in a press
    >>release, lye to the SEC and your in doggy do do past your eye balls.....
    >>
    >>http://software.silicon.com/os/0,39024651,39123685,00.htm

    >
    >
    > Interesting article. Thanks for posting it.
    >
    >
    > Divine
    >


    There have been a few around the same vain. At present the share market
    loves MS for its returns and/or capital gains, however there are
    "intersting" pieces like this coming out, one wonders for how long MS
    will be wall street's darling.

    regards

    Thing
     
    thing, Sep 5, 2004
    #3
  4. thing

    Cheetah Guest

    Re: Microsoft: Linux is a threat, it may mean prices cuts and less business for us

    thing wrote:

    > Microsoft has filed a report with the Securities and Exchange Commission
    > (SEC) - and it looks like the Redmond giant could be in for a lean year
    > ahead, even going as far as to hint that Linux and other open-source
    > rivals might be to blame........"


    How has Linux affected Microsoft? I don't think it has really hit Microsoft
    in terms of Desktop units - since Linux accounts for under four percent -
    probably less in terms of desktop machines. In terms of servers Linux may
    be much more successfull, but is not pushing Windows out of that market.

    However, what is telling is that Microsoft have been lowering the price of
    Windows to ensure that Linux doesn't get traction. Linux has already made
    MS pull up their socks when it comes to stability, and MS is still trying
    to address security. If nothing else Linux is valuable for the positive
    effect it had on Windows.

    Microsoft makes most of its dollars from Windows and Office. The operating
    system is fast becoming a commodity - as is office productivity software.
    They have also recently committed to giving cash to shareholders - so its
    huge cash reserves won't be quite so big.

    However, while it is encouraging to see that true competition is benefitting
    the consumer, I don't think Microsoft will be going anywhere soon. And
    either would I wish it... I think perhaps that in the medium to long term
    we will simply see Microsoft return to providing real value and competing
    on merit rather than lock in. It will also mean a smaller Microsoft - and
    thats gonna hurt.

    I expect we will see something like what IBM went through - staggering
    losses followed by restructuring and a change of direction. It will
    probably be more than five years away, but no more than fifteen. I think
    they will remain a big player, but will have a reduced market of between
    thirty and fifty percent of desktop devices. I'm also betting that they
    will move to Linux - and will "improve" on top of it - competing with KDE
    and Gnome by creating a layer on top of Linux which is compatible with the
    WinAPI. At least thats what I would do if I were them :)

    Of course there is the coming patent fight Microsoft is planning. Perhaps
    they will think better of it, since basically its a lose lose senerio. For
    a company wanting to rebuild trust in the developer community attacking
    open source and Linux would probably be about the worst possible move.

    To begin with they would probably face all out patent warfare from IBM and
    HP. They would probably have some difficulty with the DOJ. And needless to
    say they would destroy any remaining trust the industry may have in them.
    While they might win litigation in the short term - slowing or stalling
    open source, ultimatly the outcome would be worse for them.

    Ideally - if I were Microsoft and wanted to hang in for the long term, I
    would conceed being top dog, and take a hit in order to stabalise at a
    economically sustainable level. Right now I think the problem is that
    Microsoft overheated - that they became bigger than the market can sustain.

    The result was Linux, and no amount of patent litigation will destroy the
    market force that drives companies to become economically sustainable.

    So says I :)
     
    Cheetah, Sep 5, 2004
    #4
  5. thing

    Patrick Bold Guest

    Re: Microsoft: Linux is a threat, it may mean prices cuts and less business for us

    "thing" <> wrote in message
    news:SVv_c.2133$...

    >>

    >
    > There have been a few around the same vain. At present the share
    > market loves MS for its returns and/or capital gains, however there
    > are "intersting" pieces like this coming out, one wonders for how long
    > MS will be wall street's darling.
    >


    It's been a long time since any tech stock was the "darling" of the
    sharemarket. But so long as Microsoft has $US60 billion or so in cash to
    play with, I suspect few investors will be frightened by these kind of
    articles. Would you be?
     
    Patrick Bold, Sep 5, 2004
    #5
  6. thing

    Divine Guest

    Re: Microsoft: Linux is a threat, it may mean prices cuts and less business for us

    On Sun, 05 Sep 2004 15:42:19 +1200, thing wrote:

    > There have been a few around the same vain. At present the share market
    > loves MS for its returns and/or capital gains, however there are
    > "intersting" pieces like this coming out, one wonders for how long MS
    > will be wall street's darling.


    I think that the writing has been on the wall for several years,
    concerning Micro$oft's demise.

    Notably:

    the resentment developed amongst businesses with respect to Micro$oft's
    licencing practises,

    the resentment amongst businesses with respect to dependence on Micro$oft
    software,

    the development, and ongoing development, of alternative high quality,
    free, open source software that will salve both the above resentments.

    Also, Micro$oft has been beligerant in spreading around its fud - and that
    has been seen for what it is,

    and the alternatives are demonstrating the ability to respond quickly,
    openly, and honestly to flaws and bugs - unlike Micro$oft.

    Micro$oft is in the middle stages of its demise.

    1/ alienate clients
    2/ other developers provide alternatives liked by Micro$oft's clients
    3/ clients adopt those alternatives and dump Micro$oft.


    Divine

    --
    "Even the most fanatical Microsoft supporter has to see that Longhorn has
    become Shorthorn."
     
    Divine, Sep 5, 2004
    #6
  7. thing

    thing Guest

    Re: Microsoft: Linux is a threat, it may mean prices cuts and lessbusiness for us

    Divine wrote:
    > On Sun, 05 Sep 2004 15:42:19 +1200, thing wrote:
    >
    >
    >>There have been a few around the same vain. At present the share market
    >>loves MS for its returns and/or capital gains, however there are
    >>"intersting" pieces like this coming out, one wonders for how long MS
    >>will be wall street's darling.

    >
    >
    > I think that the writing has been on the wall for several years,
    > concerning Micro$oft's demise.
    >
    > Notably:
    >
    > the resentment developed amongst businesses with respect to Micro$oft's
    > licencing practises,
    >
    > the resentment amongst businesses with respect to dependence on Micro$oft
    > software,
    >
    > the development, and ongoing development, of alternative high quality,
    > free, open source software that will salve both the above resentments.
    >
    > Also, Micro$oft has been beligerant in spreading around its fud - and that
    > has been seen for what it is,
    >
    > and the alternatives are demonstrating the ability to respond quickly,
    > openly, and honestly to flaws and bugs - unlike Micro$oft.
    >
    > Micro$oft is in the middle stages of its demise.
    >
    > 1/ alienate clients
    > 2/ other developers provide alternatives liked by Micro$oft's clients
    > 3/ clients adopt those alternatives and dump Micro$oft.
    >
    >
    > Divine


    4/ Lets not forget they have chopped up just about every major
    competitor in the business, eg Novell, IBM, Netscape, Caldera. No big
    players like them, thats a lot of enemies all with considerable clout in
    Washington.
    5/ Lots of smaller guys who's addons to MS OSes became "standard" in the
    OS, either with MS developing its own or being forced to sell at MS's
    price knowing MS would evelope its own and thier product would become
    worthless.

    Lately MS has tried to elbow its way into alternative business streams,
    like mobile phones but its got to the stage that no company in its right
    mind will deal / partner with them, too many burnt fingers, all the way
    to the elbow.....

    When your invited to lunch with MS make sure your not the main course.....

    regards

    thing
     
    thing, Sep 5, 2004
    #7
  8. thing

    Divine Guest

    Re: Microsoft: Linux is a threat, it may mean prices cuts and less business for us

    On Sun, 05 Sep 2004 19:05:47 +1200, thing wrote:

    > Lately MS has tried to elbow its way into alternative business streams,
    > like mobile phones but its got to the stage that no company in its right
    > mind will deal / partner with them, too many burnt fingers, all the way
    > to the elbow.....


    Which could explain why Linux is doing so well with embedded appliances.


    Divine

    --
    "Even the most fanatical Microsoft supporter has to see that Longhorn has
    become Shorthorn."
     
    Divine, Sep 5, 2004
    #8
  9. thing

    thing Guest

    Re: Microsoft: Linux is a threat, it may mean prices cuts and lessbusiness for us

    Cheetah wrote:
    > thing wrote:
    >
    >
    >>Microsoft has filed a report with the Securities and Exchange Commission
    >>(SEC) - and it looks like the Redmond giant could be in for a lean year
    >>ahead, even going as far as to hint that Linux and other open-source
    >>rivals might be to blame........"

    >
    >
    > How has Linux affected Microsoft? I don't think it has really hit Microsoft
    > in terms of Desktop units - since Linux accounts for under four percent -
    > probably less in terms of desktop machines. In terms of servers Linux may
    > be much more successfull, but is not pushing Windows out of that market.


    Lots of ways, it has severely dented server sales. The next migration is
    away from Unix and MS was aiming to be the platform because of Intel
    hardware. Its in highly profitable servers sales, that MS say 5 years
    ago could have considered it owned, with that the huge tie in a profits.
    Now however MS's to move into the data center automatically replacing
    Unix has been all but squashed by Linux and open source with commercial
    companies on top (Oracle RAC as an example).

    >
    > However, what is telling is that Microsoft have been lowering the price of
    > Windows to ensure that Linux doesn't get traction. Linux has already made
    > MS pull up their socks when it comes to stability, and MS is still trying
    > to address security. If nothing else Linux is valuable for the positive
    > effect it had on Windows.


    One of MS's own managers has admitted it is going to be 2011 before MS's
    OSes can be considered secure...what ever that means.....Has XP improved
    in stability? yes, was Linux responsible? I would think only in very
    minor terms myself.

    Munich moved to Linux even though MS under cut it heavily, Newham stayed
    MS, probably because it had no real option, but MS blinked and Newham
    got a good deal (well probably, 10 years is a long time in IT).

    > Microsoft makes most of its dollars from Windows and Office. The operating
    > system is fast becoming a commodity - as is office productivity software.
    > They have also recently committed to giving cash to shareholders - so its
    > huge cash reserves won't be quite so big.


    As far as I can tell from reading MS's finances, its only profits are
    Office and the PC version of its OS. Any other endevour has not made it
    money, embedded MS has a small market share and the cost it has to be
    cut to to be competitive with the established players means no fat
    revenue stream. MSN last time I looked was costing them money, every
    year I'm not aware that has changed.

    >
    > However, while it is encouraging to see that true competition is benefitting
    > the consumer,


    I see little sign Linux is helping Joe consumer, XP Pro off the shelf is
    $800 v $10 for Mandrake...What was the cost of 2000 and NT4 before it?
    was less if I recall correctly.

    I don't think Microsoft will be going anywhere soon. And
    > either would I wish it... I think perhaps that in the medium to long term
    > we will simply see Microsoft return to providing real value and competing
    > on merit rather than lock in. It will also mean a smaller Microsoft - and
    > thats gonna hurt.


    I think MS's mind set and business gearing is welded to high profit
    margins and that I dont think it will change easily, that would mean its
    share price would flop, but I think that is coming.

    > I expect we will see something like what IBM went through - staggering
    > losses followed by restructuring and a change of direction.


    I used to work for EDS, IBM's biggest competitor in services, EDS still
    has not re-structured along the lines of IBM, and its in a bad way
    because of it, in fact it seems to be moving closer to MS everyday.

    It will
    > probably be more than five years away, but no more than fifteen. I think
    > they will remain a big player, but will have a reduced market of between
    > thirty and fifty percent of desktop devices. I'm also betting that they
    > will move to Linux - and will "improve" on top of it - competing with KDE
    > and Gnome by creating a layer on top of Linux which is compatible with the
    > WinAPI. At least thats what I would do if I were them :)


    Just like I dont see the point of unix services on the NT kernel, I do
    not see the pint of WinAPI on top of Linux.

    I think within a few years just about everything will be browser based,
    so the OS will be immiterial.

    >
    > Of course there is the coming patent fight Microsoft is planning. Perhaps
    > they will think better of it, since basically its a lose lose senerio. For
    > a company wanting to rebuild trust in the developer community attacking
    > open source and Linux would probably be about the worst possible move.


    The trouble with the patent game is, it only applies in the US and not
    (mostly) the rest of the world. So MS going for a patent war now will
    see any hope of the EU allowing patent games similar to the US dumped.
    Even if the EU follows suit the rest of asia and the 3rd world will not,
    they can see the US trying to screw them over even if the EU is dumb
    enough not to. MS as you say would need to hit big users of Open source
    and that is going to win it no friends, kinda like SCO but on a bigger
    scale. Even if that works it only applies in the US.

    > To begin with they would probably face all out patent warfare from IBM and
    > HP. They would probably have some difficulty with the DOJ.


    Especially if a Democratic President gets in this time, the only reason
    the DOJ was so soft was because of the change last time. IBM has a huge
    portfolio, I wonder who would blink first? I dont think it would be IBM.

    And needless to
    > say they would destroy any remaining trust the industry may have in them.


    From what I can see that went last year.

    > While they might win litigation in the short term - slowing or stalling
    > open source, ultimatly the outcome would be worse for them.


    Only within the US, asia will next year supposedly pass the US in GDP,
    so who cares about the US really?

    > Ideally - if I were Microsoft and wanted to hang in for the long term, I
    > would conceed being top dog, and take a hit in order to stabalise at a
    > economically sustainable level. Right now I think the problem is that
    > Microsoft overheated - that they became bigger than the market can sustain.
    >
    > The result was Linux, and no amount of patent litigation will destroy the
    > market force that drives companies to become economically sustainable.
    >
    > So says I :)


    regards

    Thing
     
    thing, Sep 5, 2004
    #9
  10. thing

    Patrick Bold Guest

    Re: Microsoft: Linux is a threat, it may mean prices cuts and less business for us

    "Divine" <> wrote in message
    news:pan.2004.09.05.05.05.56.716114@TRACKER...

    > Micro$oft is in the middle stages of its demise.


    LOL.
     
    Patrick Bold, Sep 5, 2004
    #10
  11. thing

    Patrick Bold Guest

    Re: Microsoft: Linux is a threat, it may mean prices cuts and less business for us

    "thing" <> wrote in message
    news:Koz_c.2162$...

    <snip>
    >
    > As far as I can tell from reading MS's finances, its only profits are
    > Office and the PC version of its OS. Any other endevour has not made
    > it money, embedded MS has a small market share and the cost it has to
    > be cut to to be competitive with the established players means no fat
    > revenue stream. MSN last time I looked was costing them money, every
    > year I'm not aware that has changed.
    >
    >>


    Yes, if the market for PC operating systems and desktop office tools
    dries up, then Microsoft is just another struggling company with $US60
    billion in the bank. But I wouldn't write them off just yet. No
    competitor is doing any better at this point --everyone is scrapping for
    little pieces of what are still weak, undeveloped markets -- and,
    believe me, they all WISH they had a (somewhat) diminshing revenue
    stream from the most successful software products in history to bankroll
    that effort.
     
    Patrick Bold, Sep 5, 2004
    #11
  12. thing

    steve Guest

    Re: Microsoft: Linux is a threat, it may mean prices cuts and less business for us

    Cheetah wrote:

    > How has Linux affected Microsoft?


    Linux has 25%-30% of the server market......and growing.

    --
    "Terrorism is the war of the poor and war is the terrorism of the rich." -
    Peter Ustinov
     
    steve, Sep 5, 2004
    #12
  13. thing

    Tim Guest

    Re: Microsoft: Linux is a threat, it may mean prices cuts and less business for us

    Where is it getting new deployments from?
    Last time I looked, the growth in Linux was entirely due to the losses in
    Unix.
    - Tim

    "steve" <> wrote in message
    news:413b7ff1_1@127.0.0.1...
    > Cheetah wrote:
    >
    >> How has Linux affected Microsoft?

    >
    > Linux has 25%-30% of the server market......and growing.
    >
    > --
    > "Terrorism is the war of the poor and war is the terrorism of the rich." -
    > Peter Ustinov
     
    Tim, Sep 5, 2004
    #13
  14. thing

    steve Guest

    Re: Microsoft: Linux is a threat, it may mean prices cuts and less business for us

    Tim wrote:

    > Where is it getting new deployments from?
    > Last time I looked, the growth in Linux was entirely due to the losses in
    > Unix.
    > - Tim


    "Entirely" - probably not.

    "Mainly" - probably.

    I guess the point there could be that Microsoft wanted to replace
    Unix....and it hasn't worked out that way.

    --
    "Terrorism is the war of the poor and war is the terrorism of the rich." -
    Peter Ustinov
     
    steve, Sep 6, 2004
    #14
  15. thing

    thing Guest

    Re: Microsoft: Linux is a threat, it may mean prices cuts and lessbusiness for us

    Tim wrote:
    > Where is it getting new deployments from?
    > Last time I looked, the growth in Linux was entirely due to the losses in
    > Unix.
    > - Tim
    >
    > "steve" <> wrote in message
    > news:413b7ff1_1@127.0.0.1...
    >
    >>Cheetah wrote:
    >>
    >>
    >>>How has Linux affected Microsoft?

    >>
    >>Linux has 25%-30% of the server market......and growing.
    >>
    >>--
    >>"Terrorism is the war of the poor and war is the terrorism of the rich." -
    >>Peter Ustinov

    >
    >
    >


    New projects seem to be claiming a high percentage, some estimates are
    at 4 out of 5 new projects. Upgrades of Unix to Linux as the 3~4 year
    upgrade cycle is upon us after Y2K. Intel CPUs now command respect in
    horse power and the likes of Dell can match Sun etc in hardware quality
    build at a significant cost saving (some estimates are 66% of the cost
    up to 90% of the cost).

    Migration to Linux from MS is limited from what I can see and its cost
    effectiveness in a 3~5 year cycle questionable.

    There is a lot of info out there if you wish to go looking.

    regards

    Thing
     
    thing, Sep 6, 2004
    #15
  16. thing

    thing Guest

    Re: Microsoft: Linux is a threat, it may mean prices cuts and lessbusiness for us

    steve wrote:
    > Tim wrote:
    >
    >
    >>Where is it getting new deployments from?
    >>Last time I looked, the growth in Linux was entirely due to the losses in
    >>Unix.
    >>- Tim

    >
    >
    > "Entirely" - probably not.
    >
    > "Mainly" - probably.
    >
    > I guess the point there could be that Microsoft wanted to replace
    > Unix....and it hasn't worked out that way.
    >


    I think MS's "final solution" was to master the datacentre on the backs
    of cheap Intel server hardware, beating Unix to death. All I can say is
    Unix vendors deserved it, people might critise MS for its gouging but
    the likes of HP and Sun are/were just as bad (been there, watched
    wallets being raped), MS just has a grander scale of operation.

    If Linux was say 5 years less developed I think a MS eco~system would
    have been dominant for the next 10 ~ 20 years mainly because of the
    stupidity and greed of Unixes giving it away. Fortunately Linux looks to
    hold a significant part of the data centre pie, anywhere from 40 to 70%
    and the result will be (hopefully) competition, restoring the strength
    of buyers v vendors.

    regards

    Thing
     
    thing, Sep 6, 2004
    #16
  17. thing

    Divine Guest

    Re: Microsoft: Linux is a threat, it may mean prices cuts and less business for us

    On Mon, 06 Sep 2004 17:42:20 +1200, steve wrote:

    > Tim wrote:
    >
    >> Where is it getting new deployments from?
    >> Last time I looked, the growth in Linux was entirely due to the losses in
    >> Unix.
    >> - Tim

    >
    > "Entirely" - probably not.
    >
    > "Mainly" - probably.
    >
    > I guess the point there could be that Microsoft wanted to replace
    > Unix....and it hasn't worked out that way.


    True.

    One of the interesting things is that there are some businesses which are
    only now dropping support for Unix versions of their products in favour of
    Windows only versions, and yet a mood for change in the corporate world is
    developing - away from Windows towards *nix on the desktop.


    Divine

    --
    "Even the most fanatical Microsoft supporter has to see that Longhorn has
    become Shorthorn."
     
    Divine, Sep 6, 2004
    #17
  18. Re: Microsoft: Linux is a threat, it may mean prices cuts and less business for us

    thing <> wrote in message news:<Koz_c.2162$>...

    <snip>

    > > However, what is telling is that Microsoft have been lowering the price of
    > > Windows to ensure that Linux doesn't get traction. Linux has already made
    > > MS pull up their socks when it comes to stability, and MS is still trying
    > > to address security. If nothing else Linux is valuable for the positive
    > > effect it had on Windows.

    >
    > One of MS's own managers has admitted it is going to be 2011 before MS's
    > OSes can be considered secure...what ever that means.....Has XP improved
    > in stability? yes, was Linux responsible? I would think only in very
    > minor terms myself.


    The Microsoft Security Program Manager in question did not say that at
    all

    The original article (if it even deserves to be called that) is at
    http://www.wired.com/wired/archive/12.09/view.html?pg=3

    "it's more of a 10-year timeline" does not equate to "is going to be
    2011 before MS's OSes can be considered secure"

    putting words in ones mouth

    <snip>

    > > Microsoft makes most of its dollars from Windows and Office. The operating
    > > system is fast becoming a commodity - as is office productivity software.
    > > They have also recently committed to giving cash to shareholders - so its
    > > huge cash reserves won't be quite so big.

    >
    > As far as I can tell from reading MS's finances, its only profits are
    > Office and the PC version of its OS. Any other endevour has not made it
    > money, embedded MS has a small market share and the cost it has to be
    > cut to to be competitive with the established players means no fat
    > revenue stream. MSN last time I looked was costing them money, every
    > year I'm not aware that has changed.


    MSN is indeed profitable. It had a profitable year last financial
    year just closed a couple of months back

    http://www.microsoft.com/msft/speech/FY04/MehdiFAM2004.mspx

    Revenue up 13%
    Operating income up US$688 million

    <snip>

    Regards
    Nathan
    [I speak for myself, and no one else...]
     
    Nathan Mercer, Sep 6, 2004
    #18
  19. thing

    Divine Guest

    Re: Microsoft: Linux is a threat, it may mean prices cuts and less business for us

    On Mon, 06 Sep 2004 05:24:18 -0700, Nathan Mercer wrote:

    >> One of MS's own managers has admitted it is going to be 2011 before MS's
    >> OSes can be considered secure...what ever that means.....Has XP improved
    >> in stability? yes, was Linux responsible? I would think only in very
    >> minor terms myself.

    >
    > The Microsoft Security Program Manager in question did not say that at
    > all
    >
    > The original article (if it even deserves to be called that) is at
    > http://www.wired.com/wired/archive/12.09/view.html?pg=3
    >
    > "it's more of a 10-year timeline" does not equate to "is going to be
    > 2011 before MS's OSes can be considered secure"


    Let's see...

    A 10 year timeline from this year is... 2014!


    Divine

    --
    "Even the most fanatical Microsoft supporter has to see that Longhorn has
    become Shorthorn."
     
    Divine, Sep 6, 2004
    #19
  20. Re: Microsoft: Linux is a threat, it may mean prices cuts and lessbusiness for us

    Divine wrote:
    > On Mon, 06 Sep 2004 05:24:18 -0700, Nathan Mercer wrote:
    >
    >
    >>>One of MS's own managers has admitted it is going to be 2011 before MS's
    >>>OSes can be considered secure...what ever that means.....Has XP improved
    >>>in stability? yes, was Linux responsible? I would think only in very
    >>>minor terms myself.

    >>
    >>The Microsoft Security Program Manager in question did not say that at
    >>all
    >>
    >>The original article (if it even deserves to be called that) is at
    >>http://www.wired.com/wired/archive/12.09/view.html?pg=3
    >>
    >>"it's more of a 10-year timeline" does not equate to "is going to be
    >>2011 before MS's OSes can be considered secure"

    >
    >
    > Let's see...
    >
    > A 10 year timeline from this year is... 2014!


    yeah, a 10 year timeline for what though?

    Microsoft realises it has had Security problems and has a comprehensive
    plan for solving those issues.

    Steps have been taken to protect the confidentiality, integrity, and
    availability of data and systems at every phase of the software
    development process—from design, to delivery, to maintenance.

    As well as a solid roadmap for Security enabled features out over the
    next 5-10 years

    IMHO, in general Linux/OSS is still in denial. Microsoft tried that for
    a while. Burying your head into the sand does not make the problem go away.

    You don't even believe there are security problems with OSS, do you?

    Nathan, CISSP
    Wellington
    [I speak for myself, and no one else...]
     
    Nathan Mercer, Sep 6, 2004
    #20
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