Microsoft Gets Tough(er) on Windows Piracy...

Discussion in 'NZ Computing' started by steve, Jul 27, 2005.

  1. steve

    steve Guest

    *******************************************************************************

    http://www.globetechnology.com/servlet/story/RTGAM.20050726.wxmicrosoft0726/BNStory/International/

    Bill Gates will be frisking you with a simple point and click

    By SIMON AVERY
    Tuesday, July 26, 2005 Updated at 5:17 AM EDT
    From Tuesday's Globe and Mail

    The next time you visit the website of Microsoft Corp. to download some
    software, be prepared to let the world's biggest software company have a
    look inside your computer.

    In a determined strike to quell the proliferation of counterfeit
    software, beginning today, Microsoft will require that all customers
    coming to its website for upgrades and other downloads submit their
    computers to an electronic frisking.

    If you use one of the estimated hundred million PCs running pirated
    software, don't expect your upgrade. For Microsoft, the new policy is a
    stepped-up effort to combat the loss of billions of dollars worth of
    software sales every year to counterfeiters around the world. But in
    ramping up efforts to fight piracy, the Redmond, Wash.-based behemoth
    already finds itself fending off critics over privacy.

    ......

    The company will scan machines for a variety of information, including
    product keys or software authorization codes, operating-system version
    and details on the flow of data between the operating system and other
    hardware, such as printers.

    It is access to this information that particularly upsets the privacy
    advocates. Ms. Dixon says the only information Microsoft needs to fight
    piracy is the product key and the operating-system version, and she says
    that Microsoft will be able to identify users uniquely based on some of
    the information the company collects.

    "They are grabbing more information than they need to deter piracy," she
    said.

    If Microsoft deems a PC to be carrying contraband code, it won't allow a
    user to download Microsoft programs, with the exception of security
    patches. But the software company — which says that more than one in
    five U.S. computers runs a counterfeit version of its Windows product —
    is not just waving a stick. It is also offering a big carrot.

    Microsoft said it will give a free copy of its Windows XP to customers
    who unknowingly bought a counterfeit version of the operating system and
    who fill out a piracy report, provide proof of purchase and send
    Microsoft the counterfeit CDs.

    Customers who cannot provide proof of purchase but file a piracy report
    will receive a substantial discount on a legitimate version of the
    operating system, said Tim Prime, a product manager in the Windows
    client group at Microsoft Canada Co., a subsidiary of the U.S. company.

    Executives at Microsoft reject any suggestions that the move will
    antagonize customers with privacy concerns.

    "Customers want to know whether retailers have sold them genuine
    software," Mr. Prime said.

    More than 40 million users agreed to have their systems scanned in a
    10-month trial that began last September in several countries. The
    participation rate amounted to 58 per cent of all visitors to the pilot
    website, far exceeding Microsoft's expectations of just 10 per cent, Mr.
    Prime said.

    Microsoft said no personal data will be collected during the validation
    process, and information will remain completely anonymous. The company
    said it commissioned TÜV-ITÖ, an independent German security auditor, to
    test how well its Windows Genuine Advantage program protects customers'
    data, and the firm concluded that Microsoft does not collect any
    personal information that would allow it to identify or contact a user.

    Seth Schoen, a staff technologist at the Electronic Frontier Foundation,
    a civil liberties group in San Francisco specializing in technology
    issues, agreed that Microsoft would not be able to identify customers
    personally through the program. But the data collected are unique to
    every customer, just as human fingerprints are unique, and the issue
    becomes how long the company holds onto the details and whether they
    could become personally identifying later on, he said.

    Technology companies have walked a fine line for years on the issue of
    collecting information from consumers' computers. Six years ago,
    RealNetworks Inc., whose software plays audio and video content on the
    Internet, released a patch for its RealJukebox program after the public
    learned the software was relaying personal information about users to
    the company.

    More recently, Google Inc. created a privacy backlash when it said its
    free e-mail service, Gmail, would include special software that inserts
    ads into personal e-mails based on their content.

    Clearly, Microsoft believes any risk of public-privacy concerns are
    worth incurring to fight a problem that has turned into an epidemic in
    some parts of the world.

    Microsoft has been fighting counterfeit efforts for years with limited
    success. It says that 35 per cent of the world's computers run
    counterfeit software and that piracy cost the global software industry
    $41-billion in 2004.
    steve, Jul 27, 2005
    #1
    1. Advertising

  2. steve

    thingy Guest

    steve wrote:
    >
    > *******************************************************************************
    >
    >
    > http://www.globetechnology.com/servlet/story/RTGAM.20050726.wxmicrosoft0726/BNStory/International/
    >
    >
    > Bill Gates will be frisking you with a simple point and click
    >
    > By SIMON AVERY
    > Tuesday, July 26, 2005 Updated at 5:17 AM EDT
    > From Tuesday's Globe and Mail
    >
    > The next time you visit the website of Microsoft Corp. to download some
    > software, be prepared to let the world's biggest software company have a
    > look inside your computer.
    >
    > In a determined strike to quell the proliferation of counterfeit
    > software, beginning today, Microsoft will require that all customers
    > coming to its website for upgrades and other downloads submit their
    > computers to an electronic frisking.
    >
    > If you use one of the estimated hundred million PCs running pirated
    > software, don't expect your upgrade. For Microsoft, the new policy is a
    > stepped-up effort to combat the loss of billions of dollars worth of
    > software sales every year to counterfeiters around the world. But in
    > ramping up efforts to fight piracy, the Redmond, Wash.-based behemoth
    > already finds itself fending off critics over privacy.
    >
    > .....
    >
    > The company will scan machines for a variety of information, including
    > product keys or software authorization codes, operating-system version
    > and details on the flow of data between the operating system and other
    > hardware, such as printers.
    >
    > It is access to this information that particularly upsets the privacy
    > advocates. Ms. Dixon says the only information Microsoft needs to fight
    > piracy is the product key and the operating-system version, and she says
    > that Microsoft will be able to identify users uniquely based on some of
    > the information the company collects.
    >
    > "They are grabbing more information than they need to deter piracy," she
    > said.
    >
    > If Microsoft deems a PC to be carrying contraband code, it won't allow a
    > user to download Microsoft programs, with the exception of security
    > patches. But the software company — which says that more than one in
    > five U.S. computers runs a counterfeit version of its Windows product —
    > is not just waving a stick. It is also offering a big carrot.
    >
    > Microsoft said it will give a free copy of its Windows XP to customers
    > who unknowingly bought a counterfeit version of the operating system and
    > who fill out a piracy report, provide proof of purchase and send
    > Microsoft the counterfeit CDs.
    >
    > Customers who cannot provide proof of purchase but file a piracy report
    > will receive a substantial discount on a legitimate version of the
    > operating system, said Tim Prime, a product manager in the Windows
    > client group at Microsoft Canada Co., a subsidiary of the U.S. company.
    >
    > Executives at Microsoft reject any suggestions that the move will
    > antagonize customers with privacy concerns.
    >
    > "Customers want to know whether retailers have sold them genuine
    > software," Mr. Prime said.
    >
    > More than 40 million users agreed to have their systems scanned in a
    > 10-month trial that began last September in several countries. The
    > participation rate amounted to 58 per cent of all visitors to the pilot
    > website, far exceeding Microsoft's expectations of just 10 per cent, Mr.
    > Prime said.
    >
    > Microsoft said no personal data will be collected during the validation
    > process, and information will remain completely anonymous. The company
    > said it commissioned TÜV-ITÖ, an independent German security auditor, to
    > test how well its Windows Genuine Advantage program protects customers'
    > data, and the firm concluded that Microsoft does not collect any
    > personal information that would allow it to identify or contact a user.
    >
    > Seth Schoen, a staff technologist at the Electronic Frontier Foundation,
    > a civil liberties group in San Francisco specializing in technology
    > issues, agreed that Microsoft would not be able to identify customers
    > personally through the program. But the data collected are unique to
    > every customer, just as human fingerprints are unique, and the issue
    > becomes how long the company holds onto the details and whether they
    > could become personally identifying later on, he said.
    >
    > Technology companies have walked a fine line for years on the issue of
    > collecting information from consumers' computers. Six years ago,
    > RealNetworks Inc., whose software plays audio and video content on the
    > Internet, released a patch for its RealJukebox program after the public
    > learned the software was relaying personal information about users to
    > the company.
    >
    > More recently, Google Inc. created a privacy backlash when it said its
    > free e-mail service, Gmail, would include special software that inserts
    > ads into personal e-mails based on their content.
    >
    > Clearly, Microsoft believes any risk of public-privacy concerns are
    > worth incurring to fight a problem that has turned into an epidemic in
    > some parts of the world.
    >
    > Microsoft has been fighting counterfeit efforts for years with limited
    > success. It says that 35 per cent of the world's computers run
    > counterfeit software and that piracy cost the global software industry
    > $41-billion in 2004.


    I don think it includes security updates.

    If its figures are anything like the BSA me putting my finger up in the
    air is more accurate.

    While I believe in privacy I also think piracy is wrong. If the
    bit-torrent stuff is anything to go by, it is a huge issue and unfair.

    Myself I see this as a win for linux. As they clamp down people who
    before had "free" stuff will now be forced to pay, do without, move to
    OSS or other cheaper commercial software.

    regards

    Thing
    thingy, Jul 27, 2005
    #2
    1. Advertising

  3. steve

    steve Guest

    thingy wrote:

    > Myself I see this as a win for linux. As they clamp down people who
    > before had "free" stuff will now be forced to pay, do without, move to
    > OSS or other cheaper commercial software.


    Agreed.

    I went to linux becasue I couldn't afford to put Windows on 9 home-built
    PCs. It would have cost thousands to install full copies and then pay
    for upgrades and anti-virus software subscriptions and spyware / adware
    subscriptions......just to USE the damn thing.

    Linux allows me all the function I want / need and I avoid all that
    Windows-targeted hassle.
    steve, Jul 27, 2005
    #3
  4. steve

    PAM. Guest

    "steve" <> wrote in message
    news:42e716ab$...
    >
    >

    ****************************************************************************
    ***
    >
    >

    http://www.globetechnology.com/servlet/story/RTGAM.20050726.wxmicrosoft0726/BNStory/International/
    >
    > Bill Gates will be frisking you with a simple point and click
    >
    > By SIMON AVERY
    > Tuesday, July 26, 2005 Updated at 5:17 AM EDT
    > From Tuesday's Globe and Mail
    >
    > The next time you visit the website of Microsoft Corp. to download some
    > software, be prepared to let the world's biggest software company have a
    > look inside your computer.
    >
    > In a determined strike to quell the proliferation of counterfeit
    > software, beginning today, Microsoft will require that all customers
    > coming to its website for upgrades and other downloads submit their
    > computers to an electronic frisking.


    Phew. Thank Linux for Linspire.

    The piss easiest Linux in the world
    :)

    PAM.
    PAM., Jul 27, 2005
    #4
  5. In article <>, Rob J <> wrote:
    >On Wed, 27 Jul 2005 22:46:10 +1200, steve
    ><> wrote:
    >
    >>thingy wrote:
    >>
    >>> Myself I see this as a win for linux. As they clamp down people who
    >>> before had "free" stuff will now be forced to pay, do without, move to
    >>> OSS or other cheaper commercial software.

    >>
    >>Agreed.
    >>
    >>I went to linux becasue I couldn't afford to put Windows on 9 home-built
    >>PCs. It would have cost thousands to install full copies and then pay
    >>for upgrades and anti-virus software subscriptions and spyware / adware
    >>subscriptions......just to USE the damn thing.

    >
    >You are badly informed. You could buy OEM licenses for each PC for
    >about $100 each.


    And given linux is $0, why would you ?

    Bruce

    ----------------------------------------
    I believe you find life such a problem because you think there are the good
    people and the bad people. You're wrong, of course. There are, always and
    only, the bad people, but some of them are on opposite sides.

    Lord Vetinari in Guards ! Guards ! - Terry Pratchett

    Caution ===== followups may have been changed to relevant groups
    (if there were any)
    Bruce Sinclair, Jul 27, 2005
    #5
  6. steve

    Rob J Guest

    On Wed, 27 Jul 2005 22:46:10 +1200, steve
    <> wrote:

    >thingy wrote:
    >
    >> Myself I see this as a win for linux. As they clamp down people who
    >> before had "free" stuff will now be forced to pay, do without, move to
    >> OSS or other cheaper commercial software.

    >
    >Agreed.
    >
    >I went to linux becasue I couldn't afford to put Windows on 9 home-built
    >PCs. It would have cost thousands to install full copies and then pay
    >for upgrades and anti-virus software subscriptions and spyware / adware
    >subscriptions......just to USE the damn thing.


    You are badly informed. You could buy OEM licenses for each PC for
    about $100 each.
    Rob J, Jul 27, 2005
    #6
  7. steve

    steve Guest

    Rob J wrote:
    > On Wed, 27 Jul 2005 22:46:10 +1200, steve
    > <> wrote:
    >
    >
    >>thingy wrote:
    >>
    >>
    >>>Myself I see this as a win for linux. As they clamp down people who
    >>>before had "free" stuff will now be forced to pay, do without, move to
    >>>OSS or other cheaper commercial software.

    >>
    >>Agreed.
    >>
    >>I went to linux becasue I couldn't afford to put Windows on 9 home-built
    >>PCs. It would have cost thousands to install full copies and then pay
    >>for upgrades and anti-virus software subscriptions and spyware / adware
    >>subscriptions......just to USE the damn thing.

    >
    > You are badly informed. You could buy OEM licenses for each PC for
    > about $100 each.


    ....and then add the annual anti-virus software subs.

    9 x US$15 or more.

    ....and then do I pay for adware / spyware software, too?

    ....and then add the incessant use of my system by the vendors as an
    in-your-face advertising hoarding to sell me software and services.

    Still far more hassle and expense than I have to endure using Linux.

    $900 for Windows is still many times the $130 I paid to put Xandros
    Linux 3.0 on my systems (but one).
    steve, Jul 28, 2005
    #7
  8. steve

    steve Guest

    PAM. wrote:
    > "steve" <> wrote in message
    > news:42e716ab$...
    >
    >>

    > ****************************************************************************
    > ***
    >
    >>

    > http://www.globetechnology.com/servlet/story/RTGAM.20050726.wxmicrosoft0726/BNStory/International/
    >
    >>Bill Gates will be frisking you with a simple point and click
    >>
    >>By SIMON AVERY
    >>Tuesday, July 26, 2005 Updated at 5:17 AM EDT
    >> From Tuesday's Globe and Mail
    >>
    >>The next time you visit the website of Microsoft Corp. to download some
    >>software, be prepared to let the world's biggest software company have a
    >>look inside your computer.
    >>
    >>In a determined strike to quell the proliferation of counterfeit
    >>software, beginning today, Microsoft will require that all customers
    >>coming to its website for upgrades and other downloads submit their
    >>computers to an electronic frisking.

    >
    >
    > Phew. Thank Linux for Linspire.
    >
    > The piss easiest Linux in the world
    > :)
    >
    > PAM.


    I have to try it. It's getting good reviews....though the update policy
    is a bit more restrictive than Xandros'.....of so I have read (I do not
    know first hand).
    steve, Jul 28, 2005
    #8
  9. steve

    PAM. Guest

    "steve" <> wrote in message

    > I have to try it. It's getting good reviews....though the update policy
    > is a bit more restrictive than Xandros'.....of so I have read (I do not
    > know first hand).


    UPDATE POLICY? (Bloody caps lock)

    IIRC, you have to be a member of Click 'n' Run (CNR) Warehouse (US$50 per
    annum) in order to get easy 1-click download an install on your PC and
    updates to/new versions of the OS.
    This US$50 is for support and ease of use/install and not for the software
    you can get for free anywhere else....which you have to know how to install,
    first.
    Try the Live-CD to make sure it works with your current hardware
    www.lfriendly.com for Linspire-friendly hardware (unsure if still updated)
    www.lraiser.com for a graphic to see where and how many people are using
    Linspire around the world.

    I only promote it because I like it. I recieve no money from Linspire
    Inc....unfortunately
    :)

    PAM.
    PAM., Jul 28, 2005
    #9
  10. "steve" <> wrote in message
    news:42e716ab$...
    >
    > *******************************************************************************
    >
    > http://www.globetechnology.com/servlet/story/RTGAM.20050726.wxmicrosoft0726/BNStory/International/
    >
    > Bill Gates will be frisking you with a simple point and click
    >
    > By SIMON AVERY
    > Tuesday, July 26, 2005 Updated at 5:17 AM EDT
    > From Tuesday's Globe and Mail
    >
    > The next time you visit the website of Microsoft Corp. to download some
    > software, be prepared to let the world's biggest software company have a
    > look inside your computer.
    >
    > In a determined strike to quell the proliferation of counterfeit software,
    > beginning today, Microsoft will require that all customers coming to its
    > website for upgrades and other downloads submit their computers to an
    > electronic frisking.
    >
    > If you use one of the estimated hundred million PCs running pirated
    > software, don't expect your upgrade. For Microsoft, the new policy is a
    > stepped-up effort to combat the loss of billions of dollars worth of
    > software sales every year to counterfeiters around the world. But in
    > ramping up efforts to fight piracy, the Redmond, Wash.-based behemoth
    > already finds itself fending off critics over privacy.
    >
    > .....
    >
    > The company will scan machines for a variety of information, including
    > product keys or software authorization codes, operating-system version and
    > details on the flow of data between the operating system and other
    > hardware, such as printers.
    >
    > It is access to this information that particularly upsets the privacy
    > advocates. Ms. Dixon says the only information Microsoft needs to fight
    > piracy is the product key and the operating-system version, and she says
    > that Microsoft will be able to identify users uniquely based on some of
    > the information the company collects.
    >
    > "They are grabbing more information than they need to deter piracy," she
    > said.
    >
    > If Microsoft deems a PC to be carrying contraband code, it won't allow a
    > user to download Microsoft programs, with the exception of security
    > patches. But the software company — which says that more than one in five
    > U.S. computers runs a counterfeit version of its Windows product — is not
    > just waving a stick. It is also offering a big carrot.
    >
    > Microsoft said it will give a free copy of its Windows XP to customers who
    > unknowingly bought a counterfeit version of the operating system and who
    > fill out a piracy report, provide proof of purchase and send Microsoft the
    > counterfeit CDs.
    >
    > Customers who cannot provide proof of purchase but file a piracy report
    > will receive a substantial discount on a legitimate version of the
    > operating system, said Tim Prime, a product manager in the Windows client
    > group at Microsoft Canada Co., a subsidiary of the U.S. company.
    >
    > Executives at Microsoft reject any suggestions that the move will
    > antagonize customers with privacy concerns.
    >
    > "Customers want to know whether retailers have sold them genuine
    > software," Mr. Prime said.
    >
    > More than 40 million users agreed to have their systems scanned in a
    > 10-month trial that began last September in several countries. The
    > participation rate amounted to 58 per cent of all visitors to the pilot
    > website, far exceeding Microsoft's expectations of just 10 per cent, Mr.
    > Prime said.
    >
    > Microsoft said no personal data will be collected during the validation
    > process, and information will remain completely anonymous. The company
    > said it commissioned TÜV-ITÖ, an independent German security auditor, to
    > test how well its Windows Genuine Advantage program protects customers'
    > data, and the firm concluded that Microsoft does not collect any personal
    > information that would allow it to identify or contact a user.
    >
    > Seth Schoen, a staff technologist at the Electronic Frontier Foundation, a
    > civil liberties group in San Francisco specializing in technology issues,
    > agreed that Microsoft would not be able to identify customers personally
    > through the program. But the data collected are unique to every customer,
    > just as human fingerprints are unique, and the issue becomes how long the
    > company holds onto the details and whether they could become personally
    > identifying later on, he said.
    >
    > Technology companies have walked a fine line for years on the issue of
    > collecting information from consumers' computers. Six years ago,
    > RealNetworks Inc., whose software plays audio and video content on the
    > Internet, released a patch for its RealJukebox program after the public
    > learned the software was relaying personal information about users to the
    > company.
    >
    > More recently, Google Inc. created a privacy backlash when it said its
    > free e-mail service, Gmail, would include special software that inserts
    > ads into personal e-mails based on their content.
    >
    > Clearly, Microsoft believes any risk of public-privacy concerns are worth
    > incurring to fight a problem that has turned into an epidemic in some
    > parts of the world.
    >
    > Microsoft has been fighting counterfeit efforts for years with limited
    > success. It says that 35 per cent of the world's computers run counterfeit
    > software and that piracy cost the global software industry $41-billion in
    > 2004.


    As usual, the few ruin it for the rest.

    eg, why do we all have to buy locks and/or alarms for our houses - the lock
    industry probably has made billions in profits over the years. Because, a
    few people burgle houses so house owners take action to protect themselves
    from financial loss. Microsoft are just protecting themselves from
    financial loss too.
    news.xtra.co.nz, Jul 28, 2005
    #10
  11. steve

    thing2 Guest

    Rob J wrote:
    > On Wed, 27 Jul 2005 22:46:10 +1200, steve
    > <> wrote:
    >
    >
    >>thingy wrote:
    >>
    >>
    >>>Myself I see this as a win for linux. As they clamp down people who
    >>>before had "free" stuff will now be forced to pay, do without, move to
    >>>OSS or other cheaper commercial software.

    >>
    >>Agreed.
    >>
    >>I went to linux becasue I couldn't afford to put Windows on 9 home-built
    >>PCs. It would have cost thousands to install full copies and then pay
    >>for upgrades and anti-virus software subscriptions and spyware / adware
    >>subscriptions......just to USE the damn thing.

    >
    >
    > You are badly informed. You could buy OEM licenses for each PC for
    > about $100 each.
    >
    >


    So just blown $900, plus a 10 user anti-virus package at $25 each (US?)

    So Ive just spent $1000 ish, then of course there is an Office package,
    $300 each?

    The best part of $4000 for MS malware v $0.....for Linux.

    regards

    Thing
    thing2, Jul 28, 2005
    #11
  12. steve

    PAM. Guest

    "thing2" <> wrote in message

    > So just blown $900, plus a 10 user anti-virus package at $25 each (US?)
    >
    > So Ive just spent $1000 ish, then of course there is an Office package,
    > $300 each?
    >
    > The best part of $4000 for MS malware v $0.....for Linux.


    Even if you did spend $$$ on Linux, you would own it and be able to put it
    on whatever machines you like. So even if you bought a copy for $100, it's
    only $100

    PAM.
    PAM., Jul 28, 2005
    #12
  13. steve

    steve Guest

    PAM. wrote:
    > "thing2" <> wrote in message
    >
    >
    >>So just blown $900, plus a 10 user anti-virus package at $25 each (US?)
    >>
    >>So Ive just spent $1000 ish, then of course there is an Office package,
    >>$300 each?
    >>
    >>The best part of $4000 for MS malware v $0.....for Linux.

    >
    >
    > Even if you did spend $$$ on Linux, you would own it and be able to put it
    > on whatever machines you like. So even if you bought a copy for $100, it's
    > only $100
    >
    > PAM.


    True.

    Even Xandros - who aren't free - allow you to install one copy on every
    PC in the house.
    steve, Jul 28, 2005
    #13
  14. In article <2aSFe.3958$>,
    "PAM." <> wrote:

    >Thank Linux for Linspire.
    >
    >The piss easiest Linux in the world
    >:)


    A bit too worryingly Dimdows-like, I suspect. That's the one where the
    user is always running as root, right? So in principle it's just as
    prone to 0wning attacks as Dimdows is.
    Lawrence D¹Oliveiro, Jul 28, 2005
    #14
  15. In article <>,
    Rob J <> wrote:

    >On Wed, 27 Jul 2005 22:46:10 +1200, steve
    ><> wrote:
    >
    >>thingy wrote:
    >>
    >>> Myself I see this as a win for linux. As they clamp down people who
    >>> before had "free" stuff will now be forced to pay, do without, move to
    >>> OSS or other cheaper commercial software.

    >>
    >>Agreed.
    >>
    >>I went to linux becasue I couldn't afford to put Windows on 9 home-built
    >>PCs. It would have cost thousands to install full copies and then pay
    >>for upgrades and anti-virus software subscriptions and spyware / adware
    >>subscriptions......just to USE the damn thing.

    >
    >You are badly informed. You could buy OEM licenses for each PC for
    >about $100 each.


    For XP Pro?
    Lawrence D'Oliveiro, Jul 28, 2005
    #15
  16. steve wrote:
    > ....and then add the annual anti-virus software subs.
    >
    > 9 x US$15 or more.


    $0. AVG or AntiVir, both excellent.

    >
    > ....and then do I pay for adware / spyware software, too?


    Adaware, Spybot search & destroy, both free and excellent.

    Cheers,
    Nicholas Sherlock
    Nicholas Sherlock, Jul 28, 2005
    #16
  17. steve

    Robert Cooze Guest

    steve wrote:
    > thingy wrote:
    >
    >> Myself I see this as a win for linux. As they clamp down people who
    >> before had "free" stuff will now be forced to pay, do without, move to
    >> OSS or other cheaper commercial software.

    >
    >
    > Agreed.
    >
    > I went to linux becasue I couldn't afford to put Windows on 9 home-built
    > PCs. It would have cost thousands to install full copies and then pay
    > for upgrades and anti-virus software subscriptions and spyware / adware
    > subscriptions......just to USE the damn thing.
    >
    > Linux allows me all the function I want / need and I avoid all that
    > Windows-targeted hassle.


    I have Seen this comming I am using Wine on linux. Using wine tools I
    down loaded a lot of proggies like DCOM98 and stuff like that. Now wine
    aint a version of windows at all so next time i try that I can't
    download :) But i have most of the stuff on disk and a licence key too
    for win 98SE I think I still have a old win98 registry backedup some
    where now if i put than in my wine install would it be legit? :p


    --
    http://cooze.co.nz home of the RecyclerMan aka Robert Cooze

    / __/ / / / / /__ / / ___/ / __/ / / / |/ / /__ /
    / / / /_/ / / /_/ / _-' / __/ / / / /_/ / / /| / _-'
    ___\ ____/ ____/ /___/ /____/ /_/ ___\ ____/ /_/ /_/ |_/ /___/
    Robert Cooze, Jul 28, 2005
    #17
  18. steve

    Peter Guest

    steve wrote:
    *******************************************************************************
    >

    http://www.globetechnology.com/servlet/story/RTGAM.20050726.wxmicrosoft0726/BNStory/International/
    >
    > Bill Gates will be frisking you with a simple point and click
    >
    > The next time you visit the website of Microsoft Corp. to download some
    > software, be prepared to let the world's biggest software company have a
    > look inside your computer.


    I was helping someone with their Windos PC, installing updates and cleaning
    up spyware, etc. The MS site wanted us to run a checker tool
    (GenuineCheck.exe) to ensure we weren't running a pirated OS. This ran ok,
    but reported that the OS was not kosher. I know this is the original OS
    that was on the PC when it was bought, and certainly not pirated or altered
    at all.
    Since then I have tried the MS checker tool on a few different PCs, all
    original installs of Win XP as supplied with the PC when purchased, and all
    failed the checker test.

    If this type of checker is used to prevent updates, then there are going to
    be a lot of genuine users missing out on updates. Of course, this is bad
    for everyone, as home PCs risk being vectors for worms or being taken over
    by a trojan.
    (I expect that the guys with pirated OSs will be ok, they seem to have
    cracks for everything.)


    Peter
    Peter, Jul 28, 2005
    #18
  19. steve

    PAM. Guest

    "Lawrence D¹Oliveiro" <_zealand> wrote in message
    > A bit too worryingly Dimdows-like, I suspect. That's the one where the
    > user is always running as root, right? So in principle it's just as
    > prone to 0wning attacks as Dimdows is.


    Correct. You can set up users if you like so the ability is there, however
    when installing you have to go back to root so it causes hassle for the
    Windows to Linux converts and that's not what you would want, IMO.

    But you are correct. It is just as prone to attacks....if there were any and
    you had your firewall turned off (on as default). And you downloaded
    something from an email or mp3, mpeg. As for downloading software,, in
    theory, you'd be getting it from the CNR wareouse so there would be no
    viruses there.

    PAM.
    PAM., Jul 28, 2005
    #19
  20. steve

    steve Guest

    Nicholas Sherlock wrote:
    > steve wrote:
    >
    >> ....and then add the annual anti-virus software subs.
    >>
    >> 9 x US$15 or more.

    >
    >
    > $0. AVG or AntiVir, both excellent.
    >
    >>
    >> ....and then do I pay for adware / spyware software, too?

    >
    >
    > Adaware, Spybot search & destroy, both free and excellent.


    Thanks. :)

    I have both on the one WinXP system here.

    Other options - and extra function - require some money....and the
    pricing model is per machine.
    steve, Jul 28, 2005
    #20
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