Microsoft Document Imaging Format

Discussion in 'Computer Support' started by don, Mar 24, 2010.

  1. don

    don Guest

    I wanted to start sending my excel invoices via email attachments rather
    than faxes.
    I noticed that the Print command gave me the option of printing to an .mdi
    format and opened the Microsoft Imaging program. Was wondering if this is a
    popular enough format that most of my clients would have it and be able to
    read my invoices. I"m trying to avoid having to buy the expensive .pdf Adobe
    program.
     
    don, Mar 24, 2010
    #1
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  2. don

    LD55ZRA Guest

    No the best way to send invoices is by creating a pdf version and then
    sending it. There are many free pdf creators. The one I use is here:

    <http://www.bullzip.com/products/pdf/info.php>

    Just download it from here and install it on your system. you are done.

    hth

    "don" <> wrote in message
    news:hoc1ju$a8c$...
    >I wanted to start sending my excel invoices via email attachments rather
    >than faxes.
    > I noticed that the Print command gave me the option of printing to an .mdi
    > format and opened the Microsoft Imaging program. Was wondering if this is
    > a popular enough format that most of my clients would have it and be able
    > to read my invoices. I"m trying to avoid having to buy the expensive .pdf
    > Adobe program.
    >
    >
    >
     
    LD55ZRA, Mar 24, 2010
    #2
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  3. don

    don Guest

    "LD55ZRA" <> wrote in message
    news:hoc7al$9sb$...
    > No the best way to send invoices is by creating a pdf version and then
    > sending it. There are many free pdf creators. The one I use is here:
    >
    > <http://www.bullzip.com/products/pdf/info.php>


    Thank-you very much..........
     
    don, Mar 24, 2010
    #3
  4. don wrote:

    > I wanted to start sending my excel invoices via email attachments
    > rather than faxes.
    > I noticed that the Print command gave me the option of printing to an
    > .mdi format and opened the Microsoft Imaging program. Was wondering
    > if this is a popular enough format that most of my clients would have
    > it and be able to read my invoices. I"m trying to avoid having to buy
    > the expensive .pdf Adobe program.


    Don't send things in any kind of proprietary format.

    Go get yourself OpenOffice. It has the option to "Save As..." PDF.

    http://www.openoffice.org/

    --
    -bts
    -Four wheels carry the body; two wheels move the soul
     
    Beauregard T. Shagnasty, Mar 24, 2010
    #4
  5. don

    Tim Conway Guest

    "Beauregard T. Shagnasty" <> wrote in message
    news:hocjes$ecb$-september.org...
    > don wrote:
    >
    >> I wanted to start sending my excel invoices via email attachments
    >> rather than faxes.
    >> I noticed that the Print command gave me the option of printing to an
    >> .mdi format and opened the Microsoft Imaging program. Was wondering
    >> if this is a popular enough format that most of my clients would have
    >> it and be able to read my invoices. I"m trying to avoid having to buy
    >> the expensive .pdf Adobe program.

    >
    > Don't send things in any kind of proprietary format.
    >
    > Go get yourself OpenOffice. It has the option to "Save As..." PDF.
    >
    > http://www.openoffice.org/


    Second the Open Office. Very good program and it's free. Actually it's
    "Export as...PDF" (same difference).
     
    Tim Conway, Mar 24, 2010
    #5
  6. don

    Aardvark Guest

    On Tue, 23 Mar 2010 23:42:08 -0500, don wrote:

    > I"m trying to avoid having to buy the expensive .pdf Adobe program.


    Why would you have to buy that?



    --
    Top posting because your cursor happens to be there is like shitting in
    your pants because that's where your asshole happens to be.
     
    Aardvark, Mar 24, 2010
    #6
  7. Aardvark wrote:

    > don wrote:
    >> I"m trying to avoid having to buy the expensive .pdf Adobe program.

    >
    > Why would you have to buy that?


    If you want to do more than read them, you need the full package.

    Or ... lots of people think that Adobe is the only product that will
    read (write) PDF.

    --
    -bts
    -Four wheels carry the body; two wheels move the soul
     
    Beauregard T. Shagnasty, Mar 24, 2010
    #7
  8. don

    Aardvark Guest

    On Wed, 24 Mar 2010 11:23:25 -0400, Beauregard T. Shagnasty wrote:

    > Aardvark wrote:
    >
    >> don wrote:
    >>> I"m trying to avoid having to buy the expensive .pdf Adobe program.

    >>
    >> Why would you have to buy that?

    >
    > If you want to do more than read them, you need the full package.
    >


    Funny, I don't have Adobe anything on my system and I don't have any
    trouble doing anything with PDF files.

    :)

    > Or ... lots of people think that Adobe is the only product that will
    > read (write) PDF.


    LOL I know. Poor deluded idiots.



    --
    Top posting because your cursor happens to be there is like shitting in
    your pants because that's where your asshole happens to be.
     
    Aardvark, Mar 24, 2010
    #8
  9. don

    chuckcar Guest

    "don" <> wrote in news:hoc1ju$a8c$:

    > I wanted to start sending my excel invoices via email attachments
    > rather than faxes.
    > I noticed that the Print command gave me the option of printing to an
    > .mdi format and opened the Microsoft Imaging program. Was wondering if
    > this is a popular enough format that most of my clients would have it
    > and be able to read my invoices. I"m trying to avoid having to buy the
    > expensive .pdf Adobe program.
    >

    Isn't a fax just a picture?

    You will also find that jpg is a valid image format. And more compressed
    than PDF. Don't try to convert a jpeg to anything else though, you'll
    lose image quality.


    --
    (setq (chuck nil) car(chuck) )
     
    chuckcar, Mar 24, 2010
    #9
  10. don

    Jordon Guest

    chuckcar wrote:
    > "don"<> wrote in news:hoc1ju$a8c$:
    >
    >> I wanted to start sending my excel invoices via email attachments
    >> rather than faxes.
    >> I noticed that the Print command gave me the option of printing to an
    >> .mdi format and opened the Microsoft Imaging program. Was wondering if
    >> this is a popular enough format that most of my clients would have it
    >> and be able to read my invoices. I"m trying to avoid having to buy the
    >> expensive .pdf Adobe program.


    > Isn't a fax just a picture?


    Duh, yup. What's your point?

    > You will also find that jpg is a valid image format. And more compressed
    > than PDF. Don't try to convert a jpeg to anything else though, you'll
    > lose image quality.


    Sending a jpeg to a customer as a business document is a sure
    fire way to look about as unprofessional as you can get. You're
    concerned over size, for an invoice which is probably black and
    white with a 15% (or less) black coverage? In a PDF, even at 400
    dpi that would make a 220k document.

    To the OP... find a free PDF printer driver. A few have been
    suggested. Oh, and ignore chucktard.

    --
    Jordon
     
    Jordon, Mar 24, 2010
    #10
  11. don

    Peter Foldes Guest

    To create an Adobe PDF is not free. To read it is free

    --
    Peter

    Please Reply to Newsgroup for the benefit of others
    Requests for assistance by email can not and will not be acknowledged.

    "Aardvark" <> wrote in message
    news:hod903$qes$-september.org...
    > On Tue, 23 Mar 2010 23:42:08 -0500, don wrote:
    >
    >> I"m trying to avoid having to buy the expensive .pdf Adobe program.

    >
    > Why would you have to buy that?
    >
    >
    >
    > --
    > Top posting because your cursor happens to be there is like shitting in
    > your pants because that's where your asshole happens to be.
     
    Peter Foldes, Mar 24, 2010
    #11
  12. don

    Jordon Guest

    Peter Foldes wrote:
    > To create an Adobe PDF is not free. To read it is free


    Not correct. I have several freeware programs that will
    create PDF files, by way of a printer driver. Editing a
    PDF in its native format is another matter.

    --
    Jordon
     
    Jordon, Mar 24, 2010
    #12
  13. don

    chuckcar Guest

    Jordon <jordon@REMOVE~THISmyrealbox.com> wrote in
    news:hodv0g$v3a$-september.org:

    > chuckcar wrote:
    >> "don"<> wrote in news:hoc1ju$a8c$:
    >>
    >>> I wanted to start sending my excel invoices via email attachments
    >>> rather than faxes.
    >>> I noticed that the Print command gave me the option of printing to
    >>> an .mdi format and opened the Microsoft Imaging program. Was
    >>> wondering if this is a popular enough format that most of my clients
    >>> would have it and be able to read my invoices. I"m trying to avoid
    >>> having to buy the expensive .pdf Adobe program.

    >
    >> Isn't a fax just a picture?

    >
    > Duh, yup. What's your point?
    >
    >> You will also find that jpg is a valid image format. And more
    >> compressed than PDF. Don't try to convert a jpeg to anything else
    >> though, you'll lose image quality.

    >
    > Sending a jpeg to a customer as a business document is a sure
    > fire way to look about as unprofessional as you can get. You're
    > concerned over size, for an invoice which is probably black and
    > white with a 15% (or less) black coverage? In a PDF, even at 400
    > dpi that would make a 220k document.
    >


    Not necessarily. PDF files are completely unnecessary bloat and way
    larger than any image format has a right to be. Reducing the amount of
    bandwidth and time used to get such files through email is only common
    internet courtesy. You can even set the quality level to 100% if you're
    worried about loss of data when the image is converted to another format
    so you don't lose quality. This could be explained in the text of the
    email and would only raise your credibility.

    PDF files *would* have a use if they were more like Postscript in their
    design. Namely an actual formatting language as opposed to a compressed
    format that anyone would be capable of using without special software.

    --
    (setq (chuck nil) car(chuck) )
     
    chuckcar, Mar 26, 2010
    #13
  14. don

    Whiskers Guest

    On 2010-03-24, Jordon <jordon@REMOVE~THISmyrealbox.com> wrote:
    > chuckcar wrote:
    >> "don"<> wrote in news:hoc1ju$a8c$:
    >>
    >>> I wanted to start sending my excel invoices via email attachments
    >>> rather than faxes.
    >>> I noticed that the Print command gave me the option of printing to an
    >>> .mdi format and opened the Microsoft Imaging program. Was wondering if
    >>> this is a popular enough format that most of my clients would have it
    >>> and be able to read my invoices. I"m trying to avoid having to buy the
    >>> expensive .pdf Adobe program.

    >
    >> Isn't a fax just a picture?

    >
    > Duh, yup. What's your point?
    >
    >> You will also find that jpg is a valid image format. And more compressed
    >> than PDF. Don't try to convert a jpeg to anything else though, you'll
    >> lose image quality.


    More compressed?

    > Sending a jpeg to a customer as a business document is a sure
    > fire way to look about as unprofessional as you can get.


    Agreed!

    > You're
    > concerned over size, for an invoice which is probably black and
    > white with a 15% (or less) black coverage? In a PDF, even at 400
    > dpi that would make a 220k document.
    >
    > To the OP... find a free PDF printer driver. A few have been
    > suggested. Oh, and ignore chucktard.


    An alternative to PDF, is DjVu. There are free and commercial programs
    for creating and reading such files, and they tend to be smaller than an
    equivalent PDF file.

    --
    -- ^^^^^^^^^^
    -- Whiskers
    -- ~~~~~~~~~~
     
    Whiskers, Mar 26, 2010
    #14
  15. don

    Jordon Guest

    chuckcar wrote:
    > Jordon wrote in


    >> Sending a jpeg to a customer as a business document is a sure
    >> fire way to look about as unprofessional as you can get. You're
    >> concerned over size, for an invoice which is probably black and
    >> white with a 15% (or less) black coverage? In a PDF, even at 400
    >> dpi that would make a 220k document.


    > Not necessarily. PDF files are completely unnecessary bloat and way
    > larger than any image format has a right to be. Reducing the amount of
    > bandwidth and time used to get such files through email is only common
    > internet courtesy. You can even set the quality level to 100% if you're
    > worried about loss of data when the image is converted to another format
    > so you don't lose quality. This could be explained in the text of the
    > email and would only raise your credibility.
    >
    > PDF files *would* have a use if they were more like Postscript in their
    > design. Namely an actual formatting language as opposed to a compressed
    > format that anyone would be capable of using without special software.


    When, as a course of business, you have to send documents
    to countless unknown systems, what better format could you
    use to ensure your document is going to be read by the most
    people, than PDF? Who doesn't have a PDF reader? By sending
    PDF's you'll never have a problem. Any other format and
    you'll soon hear: "I can't open this".

    Sending a jpeg will undoubtedly be received by someone that
    will open it in their browser, it'll be the size that will
    be too big to fit four monitors and when printed won't fit
    a letter sized piece of paper.

    We're not talking color brochures here. The OP is sending
    invoices. Size isn't an issue.
     
    Jordon, Mar 26, 2010
    #15
  16. don

    chuckcar Guest

    Jordon <jordon@REMOVE~THISmyrealbox.com> wrote in
    news:hoiife$dfl$-september.org:

    > chuckcar wrote:
    >> Jordon wrote in

    >


    >> PDF files *would* have a use if they were more like Postscript in
    >> their design. Namely an actual formatting language as opposed to a
    >> compressed format that anyone would be capable of using without
    >> special software.

    >
    > When, as a course of business, you have to send documents
    > to countless unknown systems, what better format could you
    > use to ensure your document is going to be read by the most
    > people, than PDF? Who doesn't have a PDF reader? By sending
    > PDF's you'll never have a problem. Any other format and
    > you'll soon hear: "I can't open this".
    >

    Can't open a file format used with MS Paint? go on pull the other one.

    > Sending a jpeg will undoubtedly be received by someone that
    > will open it in their browser, it'll be the size that will
    > be too big to fit four monitors and when printed won't fit
    > a letter sized piece of paper.
    >

    Now you're assuming that there's no other image handling software on the
    computer at all. Quite a logical leap.

    > We're not talking color brochures here. The OP is sending
    > invoices. Size isn't an issue.
    >

    No, but wasting it in emails is certainly not good netiquette.

    This sounds more like coputer noobs that just aren't competent using
    computers than anything else. Don't know how to open a jpeg file? Come
    on!

    --
    (setq (chuck nil) car(chuck) )
     
    chuckcar, Mar 26, 2010
    #16
  17. don

    Jordon Guest

    chuckcar wrote:
    > Jordon<jordon@REMOVE~THISmyrealbox.com> wrote in
    > news:hoiife$dfl$-september.org:
    >
    >> chuckcar wrote:
    >>> Jordon wrote in

    >>

    >
    >>> PDF files *would* have a use if they were more like Postscript in
    >>> their design. Namely an actual formatting language as opposed to a
    >>> compressed format that anyone would be capable of using without
    >>> special software.

    >>
    >> When, as a course of business, you have to send documents
    >> to countless unknown systems, what better format could you
    >> use to ensure your document is going to be read by the most
    >> people, than PDF? Who doesn't have a PDF reader? By sending
    >> PDF's you'll never have a problem. Any other format and
    >> you'll soon hear: "I can't open this".
    >>

    > Can't open a file format used with MS Paint? go on pull the other one.


    Pull what other one? How many Macs have MS Paint? How many
    Linux systems have MS Paint?

    >> Sending a jpeg will undoubtedly be received by someone that
    >> will open it in their browser, it'll be the size that will
    >> be too big to fit four monitors and when printed won't fit
    >> a letter sized piece of paper.


    > Now you're assuming that there's no other image handling software on the
    > computer at all. Quite a logical leap.


    No I am not. Sending a PDF assures it'll get opened and
    printed.

    >> We're not talking color brochures here. The OP is sending
    >> invoices. Size isn't an issue.


    > No, but wasting it in emails is certainly not good netiquette.


    You agree that size isn't an issue but then say "but wasting
    it in emails is certainly not good netiquette"? If size isn't
    an issue, what are you wasting? Arguing for the sake of arguing?

    > This sounds more like coputer noobs that just aren't competent using
    > computers than anything else. Don't know how to open a jpeg file? Come
    > on!


    Everyone will get it open. Getting it printed on a letter
    sized piece of paper is another matter. You have to expect
    that a portion of your customers *are* computer noobs. Why
    make life difficult for them?
     
    Jordon, Mar 29, 2010
    #17
  18. don

    chuckcar Guest

    Jordon <jordon@REMOVE~THISmyrealbox.com> wrote in
    news:hoqe9t$2rd$-september.org:

    > chuckcar wrote:
    >> Jordon<jordon@REMOVE~THISmyrealbox.com> wrote in
    >> news:hoiife$dfl$-september.org:
    >>
    >>> chuckcar wrote:
    >>>> Jordon wrote in
    >>>

    >>
    >>>> PDF files *would* have a use if they were more like Postscript in
    >>>> their design. Namely an actual formatting language as opposed to a
    >>>> compressed format that anyone would be capable of using without
    >>>> special software.
    >>>
    >>> When, as a course of business, you have to send documents
    >>> to countless unknown systems, what better format could you
    >>> use to ensure your document is going to be read by the most
    >>> people, than PDF? Who doesn't have a PDF reader? By sending
    >>> PDF's you'll never have a problem. Any other format and
    >>> you'll soon hear: "I can't open this".
    >>>

    >> Can't open a file format used with MS Paint? go on pull the other
    >> one.

    >
    > Pull what other one? How many Macs have MS Paint? How many
    > Linux systems have MS Paint?
    >

    Wrong questions. And for your information, any linux system with Wine
    set up can run MSpaint. The question *is* which don't have software
    included that can open jpegs.


    >>> Sending a jpeg will undoubtedly be received by someone that
    >>> will open it in their browser, it'll be the size that will
    >>> be too big to fit four monitors and when printed won't fit
    >>> a letter sized piece of paper.

    >
    >> Now you're assuming that there's no other image handling software on
    >> the computer at all. Quite a logical leap.

    >
    > No I am not. Sending a PDF assures it'll get opened and
    > printed.
    >
    >>> We're not talking color brochures here. The OP is sending
    >>> invoices. Size isn't an issue.

    >
    >> No, but wasting it in emails is certainly not good netiquette.

    >
    > You agree that size isn't an issue but then say "but wasting
    > it in emails is certainly not good netiquette"? If size isn't
    > an issue, what are you wasting? Arguing for the sake of arguing?
    >

    *You* said size wasn't an issue. Not me. Count the indenting >'s.
    There's three in those lines. Odd is you, even is me.

    >> This sounds more like coputer noobs that just aren't competent using
    >> computers than anything else. Don't know how to open a jpeg file?
    >> Come on!

    >
    > Everyone will get it open. Getting it printed on a letter
    > sized piece of paper is another matter. You have to expect
    > that a portion of your customers *are* computer noobs. Why
    > make life difficult for them?
    >

    If they are computer noobs, why are they handling the companies incoming
    emails? That's extremely dangerous I'd say. Anyways, you like PDF files,
    I don't. You see a reason for them, I don't. Leave it at that.

    --
    (setq (chuck nil) car(chuck) )
     
    chuckcar, Mar 29, 2010
    #18
  19. don

    Aardvark Guest

    On Mon, 29 Mar 2010 15:26:30 +0000, chuckcar wrote:

    > the companies incoming
    > emails


    WTF?????



    --
    Top posting because your cursor happens to be there is like shitting in
    your pants because that's where your asshole happens to be.
     
    Aardvark, Mar 29, 2010
    #19
  20. don

    Jordon Guest

    chuckcar wrote:
    > Jordon<jordon@REMOVE~THISmyrealbox.com> wrote in
    > news:hoqe9t$2rd$-september.org:
    >
    >> chuckcar wrote:
    >>> Jordon<jordon@REMOVE~THISmyrealbox.com> wrote in
    >>> news:hoiife$dfl$-september.org:
    >>>
    >>>> chuckcar wrote:
    >>>>> Jordon wrote in
    >>>>
    >>>
    >>>>> PDF files *would* have a use if they were more like Postscript in
    >>>>> their design. Namely an actual formatting language as opposed to a
    >>>>> compressed format that anyone would be capable of using without
    >>>>> special software.
    >>>>
    >>>> When, as a course of business, you have to send documents
    >>>> to countless unknown systems, what better format could you
    >>>> use to ensure your document is going to be read by the most
    >>>> people, than PDF? Who doesn't have a PDF reader? By sending
    >>>> PDF's you'll never have a problem. Any other format and
    >>>> you'll soon hear: "I can't open this".
    >>>>
    >>> Can't open a file format used with MS Paint? go on pull the other
    >>> one.

    >>
    >> Pull what other one? How many Macs have MS Paint? How many
    >> Linux systems have MS Paint?
    >>

    > Wrong questions. And for your information, any linux system with Wine
    > set up can run MSpaint. The question *is* which don't have software
    > included that can open jpegs.


    Would you agree that most people that use Windows will
    have IE associated with the .jpg extension? The kind of
    people that would be receiving the OP's invoices, like
    bookkeeping kind of people? And what happens when you
    try to print a jpeg from IE that doesn't fit the page?

    >>>> Sending a jpeg will undoubtedly be received by someone that
    >>>> will open it in their browser, it'll be the size that will
    >>>> be too big to fit four monitors and when printed won't fit
    >>>> a letter sized piece of paper.

    >>
    >>> Now you're assuming that there's no other image handling software on
    >>> the computer at all. Quite a logical leap.

    >>
    >> No I am not. Sending a PDF assures it'll get opened and
    >> printed.
    >>
    >>>> We're not talking color brochures here. The OP is sending
    >>>> invoices. Size isn't an issue.

    >>
    >>> No, but wasting it in emails is certainly not good netiquette.

    >>
    >> You agree that size isn't an issue but then say "but wasting
    >> it in emails is certainly not good netiquette"? If size isn't
    >> an issue, what are you wasting? Arguing for the sake of arguing?
    >>

    > *You* said size wasn't an issue. Not me. Count the indenting>'s.
    > There's three in those lines. Odd is you, even is me.


    I believe this is how it went...

    I said: "Size isn't an issue"
    You said: "No, but wasting it in email is..."

    That leads me to believe that you agree, size isn't an issue.

    >>> This sounds more like coputer noobs that just aren't competent using
    >>> computers than anything else. Don't know how to open a jpeg file?
    >>> Come on!

    >>
    >> Everyone will get it open. Getting it printed on a letter
    >> sized piece of paper is another matter. You have to expect
    >> that a portion of your customers *are* computer noobs. Why
    >> make life difficult for them?


    > If they are computer noobs, why are they handling the companies incoming
    > emails? That's extremely dangerous I'd say.


    THEY'RE RECEIVING THE OP'S INVOICES! THEY'RE NOT IN THE IT
    DEPARTMENT!
     
    Jordon, Mar 29, 2010
    #20
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